Andrew lewis golf

andrew lewis golf

Andrew Lewis Golf. Lady of the Lake Blvd, Lewisville (TX), , United States. Get Directions · () · casinoextra.fr Player Profiles from the WORLD AMATEUR GOLF RANKING® with their ranking on the basis of their average performance in Counting Events over the previous Andrew Lewis Andrew Lewis joins the Old American Golf Club team as facility direct Dec 11, casinoextra.fr

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Feature Interview with Andrew Lewis
August,

Andrew Lewis lives in Chicago, IL with his wife and six-year-old twins.  During the week, he leads a team of corporate strategy, operational improvement and communications professionals for a global pharmaceutical company, and on the weekends he struggles to shoot anywhere near his handicap index at his clubs in Chicago and/or Traverse City, MI.  Andrew’s interest in golf course architecture was sparked by his time playing The Course at Yale, thanks to which he stumbled upon casinoextra.fr Andrew is the present Grounds Chair as well as Vice President of the Board of Governors at Beverly Country Club.

1. Let’s talk about Beverly’s history during the 20th century. When was the club founded and what events has it held?

Beverly Country Club has a long and proud history that extends back to its formation in   Originally laid out by former club professional George O’Neil, the course hosted its first tournament of note in when the Western Open was contested and won by Chick Evans.

As a brief aside, I would note that the connection between Beverly CC and Mr. Evans extends beyond that tournament win.  Many would know that in addition to his accomplishments on the course, Mr. Evans also established the Evans Scholars Foundation through the Western Golf Association, which awards full tuition and housing scholarships to deserving caddies with limited financial means.  This scholarship has special meaning at Beverly CC thanks to deep involvement of many at the Club; more than a dozen current members have served as Directors of the Western Golf Association, including luminaries like Mike Keiser, Bill Shean and Bill Kingore, who is a long-serving WGA executive.  To date, the Club has produced Evans Scholars Alumni from the program’s total of 11, – the most of any club in the country and a fact of which we are especially proud.

Now, back to the tournament history.

Following Mr. Evans’ win on the original O’Neil layout, noted golf course architect Donald Ross developed a master plan that was implemented over the coming years and effectively serves as the backbone of the course as presented today.

Notable championships and champions on the “Ross course” at Beverly CC include:

  • Western Amateur – John Lehman
  • U.S. Amateur – Francis Ouimet
  • Women’s Western Open – Helen Hicks
  • Women’s Western Open – Joyce Ziske
  • Western Open – Arnold Palmer
  • Women’s Western Open – Susie Maxwell
  • Western Open – Jack Nicklaus
  • Western Open – Hugh Royer, Jr.
  • Chicago Open – Luke Donald (won as amateur)
  • U.S. Senior Amateur – Vinny Giles
  • Western Junior – Connor Black
  • Western Amateur – Beau Hossler

Looking ahead, the course at Beverly CC unfortunately is too short to host professional men’s tour events.  But we certainly hope to remain relevant in the world of events and tournaments for accomplished amateurs of any age and perhaps professional seniors.

2. Describe the course as it existed on opening day in

The “O’Neil course” that constituted the original layout was considered a strong test of golf that made great use of natural landforms throughout the property, most notably a ridge that cuts across what was then (and is now) the front nine.  The course measured 6, yards with a bogey of 80, as the concept of par had not yet been widely introduced.  With hickory shafted clubs and Haskell balls – not to mention holes that measured ! and !! yards – this was a very long course indeed!

The original O&#;Neil course.

Even between and – prior to involvement from Donald Ross – the original O’Neil design at Beverly CC underwent changes.

The “Ross course” largely followed the original routing, with a few notable changes, detailed as follows.  The master plan – the location of which is regrettably not known – was implemented over a series of years due to other priorities for the Club’s financial resources.

Thanks to the acquisition of additional land on the northern edge, Ross was able adjust the O’Neil routing of the front nine as follows, which allowed him to lengthen and toughen the holes and make more dramatic use of the ridge:

  • Move the location of the first green further west along the ridge
  • Eliminate the former second hole, a short par 3 that played back away from the ridge toward the first tee – interestingly, the mounds that surrounded the old O’Neil second green are still visible
  • Shorten the former third hole (which played yards!) but toughen it through bunkering and a new green
  • Create new third and fourth holes – a long par 3 and a dogleg-left par 4
  • Combine the former fifth and sixth holes into a single long hole (now the seventh)
  • Create a new par 3 sixth hole
  • Combine the former eighth and ninth holes into a single, longer hole

On the back nine, Ross left the O’Neil routing mostly intact, but did make one important change that gives Beverly CC its reputation as having a fearsome closing four holes.

The fifteenth and sixteenth holes always played as longer par 4’s, but were originally followed by another long-ish par 4 and a short-ish par 3.  Ross changed that by creating the diabolical seventeenth hole – a longer par 3 that is sometimes best played by laying up short of the green – and the challenging eighteenth hole – a stout par 5 with a severely canted back-to-front green.

Newspapers that covered Mr. Ross’s visit ran headlines that read:  “Ross Promises Beverly Boys a Fine Course” and “Donald Ross Gives Beverly Fine Getaway.”  We couldn’t agree more.

Interestingly, this topographical plan of the Ross routing was drawn up by the architectural firm of none other than Chick Evans!

3. Describe the course as it existed in   What was the club’s ethos in ? What was its reputation regionally?

Beverly was widely respected as a difficult and attractive parkland course, probably in most Chicago golfers’ top ten in town, but there didn&#;t seem to be any buzz about Beverly outside of the locals.

By , the course played as a boxed-in, over-treed bowling alley thanks to well-intentioned but questionably executed tree planting, especially in response to issues posed by Dutch elm disease.  This made the course very hard because one could not advance the ball out of the rough toward the green on many holes, relying instead on the “Beverly Punch” – a sideways blast with a low iron just to get back into the fairway.  This left players with a lot of added strokes, not that the Membership much cared about it, because it was the &#;toughness&#; of Beverly that appealed.

In terms of ethos, Beverly was a club filled with traders, lawyers, contractors, politicians and businessmen.  More than half of the members lived in the Beverly neighborhood or nearby southwest suburbs.  Beverly was a lively, socially active place, whether on the course, in the pool, in the dining areas or the bar.  Very few had difficulty in making their F&B minimum.

4. A small cadre of members recognized something was amiss.  How did they gain permission from the board to contact Ron Prichard in the late ’s?

There were a few members who became interested in golf course architecture, the study of which was starting to &#;catch on&#; across America at that time, and clubs that had sort of forgotten about their architectural roots to consider how they might recapture their place in that history.

In addition, “good” and “difficult” were becoming less synonymous and width, angles and the sense of defending par at the green – original principles that date back to Ross and his contemporaries – were coming back.

At Beverly CC, a small group of members led by Rick Holland, Paul Richards, Mike Floodstrand and Terry Lavin embarked upon a gradual education process, which culminated in the creation of a Restoration Committee which was composed of various factions in the club and tasked with working with Ron Prichard to consider what to do.

Not surprisingly, the Committee had great difficulty in gaining consensus.  This led Mr. Prichard to suggest that he redo the &#;most vanilla hole,&#; the fourteenth, to bring his proposed plan to life.  He argued that if the Club liked his work there, it would like the rest.  This was a great sales job because at that time, computer renderings of bunker reconfiguration, tree removal and fairway alignment were not the type of thing one could simply whip up on an iPhone.  It gave the Membership the tangible expression of potential that it needed.

But despite the overwhelming appreciation for the new 14th hole, club politics remain club politics, and continued battles over various details of the proposed restoration led to a fair amount of compromise that effectively allowed only around 70% of the recommended changes to be realized.  Individual trees became sacred cows, and very few had any affection for ANY changes to hole fifteen, widely held as the best hole on the course.

In the end, the compromised restoration represented progress.  Members were pleased, and the Club began receiving national attention amongst the architecture through commentary from critics like Brad Klein and Ron Whitten, and chatter on casinoextra.fr and within the Donald Ross Society.  But work remained.

5. What were Prichard’s first impressions?  

I’m reluctant to put words in the mouth of such an accomplished craftsman and artisan – not to mention skilled player! – so I had an email conversation with Mr. Prichard to solicit his recollection.

He began by noting that Beverly is an early Ross course, and early Ross courses have certain visual and playing characteristics, many of which were absent at the time his relationship with the Club began.

He commented that the course had tree-crowded fairways but also, as a result, minimally effective fairway bunkering. There were no optional methods of play – the golfer had only to hope to hit the center of the fairway.

The bunkering at the time was in disrepair and didn’t reach close enough to the putting surfaces, although at many greens he could see that space for meaningful putting surface expansion was still available.  Sand was not flashed at all in the bunkers, hence one easily could end up with a ball in the sand, &#;frozen&#; right up against the green side face.

The fairways didn’t reach the leading edge of any bunkers – in fact most fairway bunkers were outside the perimeter edges of the fairway.

Mr. Prichard closed by stating that at Beverly CC, the greatest challenge and obstacle throughout his work was resistance to proper tree removal. It took years to finally recognize that, and the truth is, that push came from a small number of committed Members. Brad Klein also deserves recognition for his effort, but it really came down to the Membership embracing the concept of removing trees.

6. Walk us through the steps required to allow Prichard to commence work. What period did Phase 1 cover? What was accomplished in Phase 1?

The major accomplishment during the work in the late ’s and early ’s was the restoration of the original Ross design intent of playing corridors that offer angles into the green.

This was guided by a thorough review of historic artifacts and photos, as well as Mr. Prichard’s extensive knowledge and scholarship on Ross courses.

Key aspects of the work included:

  • Removal of many, many trees;
  • Widening playing corridors;
  • Reclaiming green surface;
  • Shaping features (e.g., bunkers) with era-appropriate look and feel; and
  • Generally regaining the scale of the property as it existed during Ross’s time.

7. What was the membership&#;s reaction?  

Upon reopening in , the Club intended to execute against the Master Plan that Mr. Prichard had developed with further ongoing tree removal, further widening of playing corridors, and restoration and/or enhancement of other features.

However, that didn’t happen.  The first phase of work was viewed by some as such a success that more was not necessary, and certainly the advocates of the first phase were understandably fatigued from that effort and perhaps just wanted to enjoy the course for a while.

It all became a moot point, though, when the financial market collapse of took hold.  Like clubs across the country, Beverly saw its membership roster shrink and cash reserves dissipate.  The Club’s Board prudently prioritized membership and financial stability and put further course restoration work on hold.

8. What period did Phase 2 cover? What was accomplished in Phase 2?

By , the Club’s membership had stabilized and, what’s more, the Club’s “architectural IQ” had continued to increase.  More members took an interest in what had happened before and what could happen next.

The Club invited Mr. Prichard to return and make recommendations on a staged approach to updating the Master Plan, this time supported by Tyler Rae and once again with the involvement of Brad Klein.  I’d also note that our Superintendent, Kirk Spieth, has been an integral part of the team.

This led to a series of smaller projects that were executed over a few years, and which started, of course, with trees.

It was immediately clear that not only was further tree removal necessary in order to consider plans for Phase 3, but that tree removal was necessary to recapture gains made during Phase 1.  Not to sound trite, but people forget that trees grow and, when left unchecked for a decade, can begin to suffocate playing corridors once again.

That is not to say that the course had re-grassed into its pre state.  The work done during that time had held up nicely, and the added availability of light and air circulation had led to incremental gains in turf health every year.  But more could be done.

As such, the Club embarked upon a tree management exercise the following winter and felled around trees that were sick/diseased, inhibiting turf growth and health or prohibiting the appropriate expansion of playing corridors.

The Club also extended irrigation lines to stretch into the former tree line – now that the grass had access to light and air circulation, water was the missing ingredient in growing uniformly thick rough.

And finally, green surface expansion that had begun in the early ’s was concluded, adding some % of surface area throughout the course.

This work – which one would rightly consider catch-up work to compensate for neglect on pruning that should have been done annually over the past decade – set the stage for a full proposal to update the Master Plan.

9. That is the course that I played last fall and that is currently profiled on GolfClubAtlas. I thought it was extremely good then, one of Ross’s top dozen or so designs. How did you gain support from the members to launch into Phase 3 in ?

As noted above, the Membership’s architectural IQ had increased substantially since   More members had seen more great courses on their own and thus realized how special Beverly CC really is, and people like Paul Richards, Rick Holland and Terry Lavin had continued to beat the drum of enlightenment for the rest.

The Club could now see the scale of the land and corridors and sightlines it afforded, and acknowledged that we needed to update the scale of our hazards and features accordingly.  Also, the Club realized that equipment technology gains had made the placement of certain bunkers obsolete.

The process this time followed the general template from before.  We assembled a Committee to serve as a sounding board, conducted an aggressive campaign of Membership engagement and education, dispelled misconceptions and card-room rumors as quickly as possible, heavily leveraged the expertise of the Architects and our Superintendent to sell the case, and took a prudent approach to financing.

In the end, the vote came through with overwhelming support to proceed.

continued>>>

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Staff

Robert O. Brown, PGA

CEO
Waveland, Mississippi

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Morgan Williamson, PGA

Tournament & Player Development Director
Marrero, Louisiana

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Andrew Lewis

Tournament & Operations Manager
Hammond, Louisiana

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Kori Lukachick

Media & Program Manager
Gonzales, LA

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Kevin Walls, PGA

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Pontotoc, Mississippi

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Kristi Egnot

PGA Junior League Regional Manager
Nashville, Tennessee

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Ethos

The Latin meaning of ‘Altus’ is to raise or to elevate higher
This is the driving philosophy behind everything that we do.

Altus Performance was created to bring together coaches and athletes who are bound by this shared quest for continuous development and improvement – to constantly raise and elevate performance.

Within our interdisciplinary team of coaches – we value creativity, initiative, and a disruptive spirit that is compelled to innovate and drive the industry forward. We are a group of individuals creating ripples on the terrain of athletic performance. With the collective effort, we turn ripples into mountains, altering the landscape of sport and serving as an agent of change for the better.

In our athletes – we value desire, purpose, tenacity, and an unwavering willingness to contribute to a tribe where all involved build the culture of GREAT.

This is the common purpose that bonds our efforts with the athletes that we are so fortunate to serve. If this should align with your identity and beliefs, we’d love for you to join the Altus team.

Founder

Cameron McCormick began coaching golf in his home country of Australia in Moving to the United States in , he brought with him the coaching principles honed under the tutelage of the Victorian Institute of Sport coaches.

With a background in competitive golf, both collegiate, amateur and professional; in addition to knowledge in the biomechanics, motor learning and psychology domains, Cameron has developed an international reputation as a sought after coach to players at, or aspiring to, high levels of competitive mastery.

McCormick’s client list covers the gamut from beginner to elite players. He is most well known for coaching the #1 ranked player in the world; PGA Tour winner and Masters and U.S. Open Champion, Jordan Spieth since the age of His clients, past and present, include over 20 combined PGA, Champions, casinoextra.fr and LPGA Tour players & 4 of the last 7 USGA Junior Amateur champions.

He is a Class A PGA Member, the founder of Altus Performance and serves at the Director of Instruction at the Trinity Forest Golf Club in Dallas, Texas.

He is a Golf Magazine Top teacher and in was named the PGA of America Teacher of the Year. 

COO & High Performance Coach

Corey Lundberg is COO and High Performance Coach at Altus Performance.  He has been recognized as a Best Young Teacher in America by Golf Digest (), selected as one of Golf Digest’s Best Teachers in Texas and was named a Top 50 Kids Teachers in the United States.  Originally from Dallas and a PGA Member since , Corey graduated with a Golf Management degree from Arizona State University before landing at the Club at Carlton Woods in Houston, TX.  After serving as Director of Instruction for 6 years, building nationally recognized coaching programs for the men, ladies, and juniors there-- he returned home to Dallas to launch Altus Performance with long-time mentor and friend, Cameron McCormick.

Corey has worked with players of all ability levels from the PGA Tour, collegiate players, competitive youth golfers, elite amateurs, and recreational players alike.  As a passionate learner, he continues to pursue educational opportunities with a focus on Motor Learning, Skill Acquisition, and Competitive Player Development.  He has presented seminars on these topics at various education platforms including Golf Magazine’s Top Coach’s Summit and the World Scientific Congress of Golf in St. Andrews, Scotland.  Corey continues to share many of his insights on these topics at his website, casinoextra.fr, and has been a contributor for Golf Digest Magazine and casinoextra.fr

Lundberg has a passion for developing golfers via comprehensive player development relationships.  Short Game Performance and Competitive Player Development are areas in which he specializes.  Combined with his focus on key motor learning principles, he is able to create innovative learning environments and personalized training plans to facilitate deeper learning and retention for each of his students.

Facility Director

Andrew Lewis joins the Old American Golf Club team as facility director for Altus Performance Institute.

Originally from the Houston area, Andrew grew up playing a variety of sports eventually specializing in baseball. He first picked up a golf club at age 11 while playing with his dad and immediately developed a passion for the game. Golf served only as a recreational activity since baseball was his main focus through middle school and high school. After two shoulder surgeries and the dream of playing collegiate baseball ending, Andrew decided to give his full attention to golf his senior year of high school and the rest is history. Andrew went on to graduate from the University of Texas at Dallas where earned a bachelor’s degree in Business Administration and played on the golf team for 2 years. Since becoming a Class A PGA Professional in , Andrew has served as director of instruction at two facilities in the Dallas area, most recently at The Lakes at Castle Hills.

Andrew enjoys coaching players of varying skill – from competitive juniors, nationally ranked amateurs, touring professionals, and club golfers alike. Andrew tailors his coaching style to fit the needs of the player in front of him, not a one size fits all approach. Through the use of skill assessments, statistical analysis, on-course training, and necessary technology, Andrew can help bring lower scores to golfers of all skills levels and make this great game even more enjoyable.

High Performance Coach

Born and raised outside of Philadelphia, Nick played competitive golf in the summer and was a competitive snowboarder in the winter. Nick graduated from California University of Pennsylvania in , receiving a bachelor's degree in golf management and a minor in business.


Following graduation, Nick was an club professional at Longue Vue Club in Verona, PA for 5 years. While at Longue Vue, Nick oversaw and revitalized the junior golf program, along with providing golf instruction to players of all ages and skill levels. In , Nick became the head coach of the men's golf team at Carnegie Mellon University. After just two seasons, Nick led the 71st ranked program to 6 tournament victories and climbed 51 spots in the rankings to the decade high ranking of 20th.

In , Nick became a lead instructor at Saddlebrook Golf Academy in Tampa, FL. While at Saddlebrook, Nick was coaching a team of elite youth athletes, running adult programs, teaching collegiate and professional players, and overseeing all college recruiting for the academy. Nick has been teaching and coaching since and is a Class A PGA Professional. During that time, he has developed expertise in course management, short game coaching, and elite player development.

High Performance Coach

Before moving to the US to join Altus Performance, Mark was one of the UK’s most in-demand golf coaches. He has an outstanding record of success in developing the games of golfers of all skill levels, with his particular speciality being in coaching high performance players. 

He has taught elite players from County,  International and Professional levels,  including those playing in the Mens European Tour, the Ladies European Tour, and players from the Seniors Tour.

Marks philosophy remains unchanged – he believes passionately in coaching to the individual, and that everyone has different goals and ability, time scales, commitment levels and physical abilities. It is through this approach that he has had such incredible success with his pupils. Mark’s friendly yet enthusiastic approach has seen him become one of the most in demand coaches with all golfers, but with particular demand from elite players.

Over the years he has worked alongside some of the best experts in their field, giving Mark the opportunity to further develop, learn and improve his coaching skills. As a part of Altus Performance, he will continue to grow this knowledge and skill set, to help his clients achieve their goals . 

In Mark was awarded ‘Fellow of the PGA’ status in recognition of his achievements in coaching, and in particular the coaching and developing juniors players through to elite performers.

In the UK, Mark had successfully implemented his philosophies of coaching in running his own coaching academy in Machynys GC, a Nicklaus Design golf course, as well as National Centre of Excellence. 

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Obituary of Andrew L. Lewis, IV

Andrew L. Lewis, IV, 64, a Haverford Township Commissioner, passed away on Saturday, April 17, , at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, after a sudden and brief battle with Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease, a neurodegenerative disorder.

 

Andy lived a full life of public service and was known for his generosity and availability, and yet he was much more to his many friends and family. His wit and humor helped put people at ease in any situation. He had “an infectious giggle that began in his belly and spread all the way up to his shiny eyes,” said his daughter Annabel.

 

Born June 1, , in Bryn Mawr, PA, he was a son of the late Andrew “Drew’ L. Lewis, Jr., former U.S. Secretary of Transportation, who passed away February 10, , and the late Marilyn (Stoughton) Lewis, former Pennsylvania State Representative, who passed away December 7, He was a graduate of Souderton Area High School. He earned his B.A. in Government and Law from Lafayette College and an MBA from the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School.

 

During his early business career, Andy worked for the Xerox Corporation in sales, and for Peat, Marwick and Mitchell in accounting and business consulting. He then was a consultant for Lewis, Eckert, Robb, work that included assisting with the Reagan Bush campaign. Over the past thirty years, he was an investor and consultant in a number of business and entrepreneurial ventures including waste management, retirement community development, franchised restaurant operations, and several software and technology companies. Andy also served on the board of directors of a number of both publicly listed and private companies and was currently serving as a director of Philadelphia area-based companies, including Independence Blue Cross, The Philadelphia Contributionship Mutual Holding Company, and Vector Security Holdings, Inc.

 

Andy was active in community affairs throughout his life and volunteered for Special Olympics, Habitat for Humanity, as a Jaycee, and as a youth league head soccer coach for many years. An Eagle Scout, he served as a member of the executive board of the Valley Forge Cradle of Liberty Council of the Boy Scouts of America.

 

A strong proponent of public service, Andy was elected in and served as township supervisor in Skippack Township. Moving to Haverford Township in , Andy again became involved in politics and was elected in as the fifth ward commissioner for Haverford Township and served in that capacity for four years. He was then elected in to Delaware County Council where he completed a four-year term as council man but chose not to seek re-election. In , Andy decided to again run for Haverford Township fifth ward commissioner. He won the election in November of and took office in January of Having worked very hard to earn the voter's trust during a highly contentious political divide, he also won his reelection in

 

Andy was a member of Bryn Mawr Presbyterian Church but also took his mother to the Central Schwenkfelder Church of Worcester, PA most Sundays. He had a private pilot’s license and enjoyed golf, tennis, skiing, vacationing in the Poconos, and playing games, like Rummikub and Sudoku.

 

Above all, Andy was a devoted father and cherished time spent with his family. He went above and beyond to make his four girls happy, nurturing their own interests. “He took Gracie twice to witness the Triple Crown winning at the Belmont Stakes, woke up at 4 am to bring Ellie to the Lilly Pulitzer Warehouse sale, helped Maya train for her 24 Challenge Tournaments, and took me to around fifteen Justin Bieber concerts. These are just some of the special memories we will forever hold close,” said Annabel.

 

He is survived by his wife Wendy (Etnyre) Lewis and their daughter Maya B. Lewis; his first wife Joanna McNeil Lewis and their daughters, Grace M. Lewis, Eleanor L. and her husband, Thomas M. Kane, and Annabel P. Lewis; a brother, Russell S. Lewis and his wife, Jane; and many nieces and nephews.

 

In addition to his parents, he was preceded in death by an infant brother, Andrew L. Lewis, III; and by his sister, Karen Carrier.

 

In light of COVID restrictions on public gatherings, a private graveside service will take place for the immediate family at Garden of Memories at Central Schwenkfelder Church. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made in his memory to the Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Foundation. Please go to the Andy Lewis fundraising page at casinoextra.fr, or visit casinoextra.fr Arrangements are by the R. L. Williams, Jr. Funeral Home, Inc. of Skippack, PA. Online condolences may be made to the family at casinoextra.fr 

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2 comments

  1. affair, the first time we spoke, we had a very long phone consultation in which he gave me all my options that he could think of to resolve my case, and he

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