High jump approach radius

high jump approach radius

Once you move the approach to the apron you can play with curve radius. ▷. Do approaches running through the take off and out the other side of the pit. Once. This is a figure 8 circle drill, a drill used in the high jump. This drill is important in developing an athletes approach. To set up this drill. IN MY OPINION ONE OF THE MOST IMPORTANT ASPECTS OF THE HIGH JUMP APPROACH WHICH THE METHOD I USE INVOLVES FITTING A RADIUS MEASUREMENT TO EACH ATHLETE.

High jump approach radius - brilliant

High jump

Track and field event

The high jump is a track and field event in which competitors must jump unaided over a horizontal bar placed at measured heights without dislodging it. In its modern, most-practiced format, a bar is placed between two standards with a crash mat for landing. Since ancient times, competitors have introduced increasingly effective techniques to arrive at the current form, and the current universally preferred method is the Fosbury Flop, in which athletes run towards the bar and leap head first with their back to the bar.

The discipline is, alongside the pole vault, one of two vertical clearance events in the Olympic athletics program. It is contested at the World Championships in Athletics and the IAAF World Indoor Championships, and is a common occurrence at track and field meets. The high jump was among the first events deemed acceptable for women, having been held at the Olympic Games.

Javier Sotomayor (Cuba) is the current men's record holder with a jump of &#;m (8&#;ft 1&#;4&#;in) set in &#;– the longest-standing record in the history of the men's high jump. Stefka Kostadinova (Bulgaria) has held the women's world record at &#;m (6&#;ft 10+1&#;4&#;in) since , also the longest-held record in the event.

Rules[edit]

The rules set for the high jump by World Athletics (previously named the IAAF[1]) are Technical Rules TR26 and TR27[2] (previously Rules and [1]). Jumpers must take off from one foot. A jump is considered a failure if the jumper dislodges the bar, touches the ground, or breaks the plane of the near edge of the bar before clearance.

Competitors may begin jumping at any height announced by the chief judge, or may pass at their own discretion. Most competitions state that three consecutive missed jumps, at any height or combination of heights, will eliminate the jumper from contention. The victory goes to the jumper who clears the greatest height during the final.

Tie breaking[edit]

If two or more jumpers tie for any place, the tie-breakers are: 1) the fewest misses at the height at which the tie occurred; and 2) the fewest misses throughout the competition. If the event remains tied for first place (or a limited-advancement position to a subsequent meet), the jumpers have a jump-off, beginning at the next height above their highest success. Jumpers have one attempt at each height. If only one succeeds, he or she wins; if more than one does, these try with the bar raised; if none does, all try with the bar lowered. This process was followed at the World Championship men's event.

CompetitorMain competitionJump-offPlace
mmmmmmmmmm
Aoxooxoxxxxox2
Bxoxo-xxxxoo1
Coxoxoxxxxx3
Dxoxoxoxxx4

In the example jump-off above, the final cleared height is m, at which A B C and D each have one failure. D has two failures at lower heights compared to one each for the other three, who proceed to a jump-off at the next height above the final cleared height. C is eliminated in the second round of the jump-off m, then B wins in the third round.

A rule-change makes the jump-off optional, so that first place can be shared by agreement among tied athletes.[1] This rule led to shared gold in the Olympic men's event held in

History[edit]

The first recorded high jump event took place in Scotland in the 19th century. Early jumpers used either an elaborate straight-on approach or a scissors technique. In later years, the bar was approached diagonally, and the jumper threw first the inside leg and then the other over the bar in a scissoring motion.

Around the turn of the 20th century, techniques began to change, beginning with the Irish-American Michael Sweeney'sEastern cut-off as a variation of the scissors technique. By taking off as in the scissors method, extending his spine and flattening out over the bar, Sweeney raised the world record to &#;m (6&#;ft 5+1&#;2&#;in) in Even in , John Winter of Australia won the gold medal of the London Olympics with this style. Besides, one of the most successful female high jumper, Iolanda Balaș of Romania, used this style to dominate women's high jump for about 10 years until her retirement at

Another American, George Horine, developed an even more efficient technique, the Western roll. In this style, the bar again is approached on a diagonal, but the inner leg is used for the take-off, while the outer leg is thrust up to lead the body sideways over the bar. Horine increased the world standard to &#;m (6&#;ft 7&#;in) in His technique was predominant through the Berlin Olympics, in which the event was won by Cornelius Johnson at &#;m (6&#;ft 7+3&#;4&#;in).

American and Soviet jumpers were the most successful for the next four decades, and they pioneered the straddle technique. Straddle jumpers took off as in the Western roll but rotated their torso, belly-down, around the bar, obtaining the most efficient and highest clearance up to that time. Straddle jumper Charles Dumas was the first to clear 7ft (m), in American John Thomas pushed the world mark to &#;m (7&#;ft 3+3&#;4&#;in) in Valeriy Brumel of the Soviet Union took over the event for the next four years, radically speeding up his approach run. He took the record up to &#;m (7&#;ft 5+3&#;4&#;in) and won the gold medal of the Tokyo Olympics, before a motorcycle accident ended his career in

Platt Adams during the standing high jump competition at the Summer Olympics

American coaches, including two-time NCAA champion Frank Costello of the University of Maryland, flocked to Russia to learn from Brumel and his coaches as Vladimir Dyachkov. However, it would be a solitary innovator at Oregon State University, Dick Fosbury, who would bring the high jump into the next century.

Taking advantage of the raised, softer, artificially-cushioned landing areas that were in use by then, Fosbury added a new twist to the outmoded Eastern cut-off. He directed himself over the bar head and shoulders first, going over on his back and landing in a fashion that would likely have resulted in serious injury in the old ground-level landing pits, which were usually filled with sawdust or sand mixtures.

Since Fosbury used his new style, called the Fosbury Flop, to win the gold medal of the Mexico Olympics, it has spread quickly, and soon "floppers" were dominating international high jump competitions. The first flopper setting a world record was the American Dwight Stones, who cleared &#;m (7&#;ft 6+1&#;2&#;in) in In the female side, the year-old flopper Ulrike Meyfarth from West Germany won the gold medal of the Munich Olympics at &#;m (6&#;ft 3+1&#;2&#;in), which tied the women's world record at that time (held by the Austrian straddler Ilona Gusenbauer a year before). However, it was not until when a flopper, Sara Simeoni of Italy, broke the women's world record.

Successful high jumpers following Fosbury's lead also included the rival of Dwight Stones, metres (5&#;ft 8&#;in)-tall Franklin Jacobs of Paterson, New Jersey, who cleared &#;m (7&#;ft 7+1&#;4&#;in), metres (1&#;ft 11&#;in) over his head (a feat equalled 27 years later by Stefan Holm of Sweden); Chinese record-setters Ni-chi Chin and Zhu Jianhua; Germans Gerd Wessig and Dietmar Mögenburg; Swedish Olympic medalist and former world record holder Patrik Sjöberg; female jumpers Ulrike Meyfarth of West Germany and Sara Simeoni of Italy.

In spite of this, the straddle technique did not disappear at once. In , the year-old Soviet straddler Vladimir Yashchenko set a new world record &#;m (7&#;ft 7+1&#;2&#;in). In , he raised the record to &#;m (7&#;ft 8&#;in), and &#;m (7&#;ft 8+1&#;2&#;in) indoor, just before a knee injury ended his career effectively when he was only 20 years old. In the female side, the straddler Rosemarie Ackermann of East Germany, who was the first female jumper ever to clear 2&#;m (6&#;ft 6+1&#;2&#;in), raised the world record from &#;m (6&#;ft 4+3&#;4&#;in) to &#;m (6&#;ft 6+1&#;2&#;in) during to In fact, from 2 June to 3 August , almost 10 years after Fosbury's success, the men's and women's world records were still held by straddle jumpers Yashchenko and Ackermann respectively. However, they were the last world record holders using the straddle technique. Ackermann also won the gold medal of the Montréal Olympics, which was the last time for a straddle jumper (male or female) to win an Olympic medal.

In , the Polish flopper, Olympic gold medalist Jacek Wszoła, broke Yashchenko's world record at &#;m (7&#;ft 8+1&#;2&#;in). Two years before, the female Italian flopper Sara Simeoni, the long-term rival of Ackermann, broke Ackermann's world record at &#;m (6&#;ft 7&#;in) and became the first female flopper to break the women's world record. She also won the gold medal of the Moscow Olympics, where Ackermann placed fourth. Since then, the flop style has been completely dominant. All other techniques were almost extinct in serious high jump competitions after late s.

Technical aspects[edit]

Technique and form have evolved greatly over the history of high jump. The Fosbury Flop is currently considered the most efficient way for competitors to propel themselves over the bar.

Approach[edit]

Spanish jumper Ruth Beitiaapproaching the bar from an angle

For a Fosbury Flop, depending on the athlete's jump foot, they start on the right or left of the high jump mat, placing their jump foot farthest away from the mat. They take an eight- to ten-step approach, with the first three to five steps being in a straight line and the last five being on a curve. Athletes generally mark their approach in order to find as much consistency as possible.

The approach run can be more important than the takeoff. If a high jumper runs with bad timing or without enough aggression, clearing the bar becomes more of a challenge. The approach requires a certain shape or curve, the right amount of speed, and the correct number of strides. The approach angle is also critical for optimal height.

The straight run builds the momentum and sets the tone for a jump. The athlete starts by pushing off their takeoff foot with slow, powerful steps, then begins to accelerate. They should be running upright by the end of the straight portion.

The athlete's takeoff foot will be landing on the first step of the curve, and they will continue to accelerate, focusing their body towards the opposite back corner of the high jump mat. While staying erect and leaning away from the mat, the athlete takes their final two steps flat-footed, rolling from the heel to the toe.

Most great straddle jumpers run at angles of about 30 to 40 degrees. The length of the run is determined by the speed of the approach. A slower run requires about eight strides, but a faster high jumper might need about 13 strides. Greater speed allows a greater part of the body's forward momentum to be converted upward.[3]

The J approach favored by Fosbury floppers allows for speed, the ability to turn in the air (centripetal force), and a good takeoff position, which helps turn horizontal momentum into vertical momentum. The approach should be a hard, controlled stride so that the athlete does not fall from running at an angle. Athletes should lean into the curve from their ankles, not their hips. This allows their hips to rotate during takeoff, which in turn allows their center of gravity to pass under the bar.[4]

Takeoff[edit]

The takeoff can be double-arm or single-arm. In both cases, the plant foot should be the foot farthest from the bar, angled towards the opposite back corner of the mat, as they drive up the knee on their non-takeoff leg. This is accompanied by a one- or two-arm swing while driving the knee.

Unlike the straddle technique, where the takeoff foot is "planted" in the same spot regardless of the height of the bar, flop-style jumpers must adjust their approach run as the bar is raised so that their takeoff spot is slightly farther out from the bar. Jumpers attempting to reach record heights commonly fail when most of their energy is directed into the vertical effort and they knock the bar off the standards with the backs of their legs as they stall.

An effective approach shape can be derived from physics. For example, the rate of backward spin required as the jumper crosses the bar in order to facilitate shoulder clearance on the way up and foot clearance on the way down can be determined by computer simulation. This rotation rate can be back-calculated to determine the required angle of lean away from the bar at the moment of planting, based on how long the jumper is on the takeoff foot. This information, together with the jumper's speed, can be used to calculate the radius of the curved part of the approach. One can also work in the opposite direction by assuming a certain approach radius and determining the resulting backward rotation.

Drills can be practiced to solidify the approach. One drill is to run in a straight line and then run two to three circles spiraling into one another. Another is to run or skip a circle of any size two to three times in a row.[5] It is important to leap upwards without first leaning into the bar, allowing the momentum of the J approach to carry the body across the bar.

Flight[edit]

The knee on the athlete's non-takeoff leg naturally turns their body, placing them in the air with their back to the bar. The athlete then drives their shoulders towards the back of their feet, arching their body over the bar. They can look over their shoulder to judge when to kick both feet over their head, causing their body to clear the bar and land on the mat.[6]

All-time top 25[edit]

See also: Men's high jump world record progression, Women's high jump world record progression, and Men's high jump indoor world record progression

Key

&#;&#;set prior to IAAF acceptance of indoor events as equivalent with outdoor events (in )

Men (absolute)[edit]

Notes[edit]

Below is a list of all other performances (excluding ancillary jumps) equal or superior to m:

  • Javier Sotomayor also jumped (), ( & i), (), (i & ) and (, , , 2 × i, & ).
  • Mutaz Essa Barshim also jumped ( & i), (, i & ) and (i, , & ).
  • Patrik Sjöberg also jumped (i) and (i).
  • Bohdan Bondarenko also jumped () and ().
  • Ivan Ukhov also jumped (i & ) and (i & i).
  • Carlo Thränhardt also jumped (i).

Women (absolute)[edit]

Notes[edit]

Below is a list of all other performances (excluding ancillary jumps) equal or superior to m:

  • Stefka Kostadinova also jumped (), (, & ), (, , & i) and (, i, , , i, , & ).
  • Blanka Vlašić also jumped (), (, & i) and (, i, , i, & ).
  • Kajsa Bergqvist also jumped () and ( & ).
  • Anna Chicherova also jumped (i) and ( & ).
  • Heike Henkel also jumped ().
  • Hestrie Cloete also jumped ().
  • Ariane Friedrich also jumped (i).
  • Mariya Lasitskene also jumped (, i & ).

Olympic medalists[edit]

Men[edit]

Women[edit]

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  Apr      By Travis Geopfert

Developing An Athletes High Jump Approach: Figure 8 Circle Drill



This is a figure 8 circle drill, a drill used in the high jump. This drill is important in developing an athletes approach. To set up this drill, place two circles side by side with a 12 foot radius (24 foot diameter) of each with the circles roughly 5 feet apart. The athlete should run around the circles in a figure 8 position. This drill teaches an athlete how to transition into the curve properly. When executing this drill, the athlete is forced into proper body lean from the straight segment of their approach, into the curve.

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CONSEQUENCES OF DEVIATION FROM THE CURVE RADIUS IN THE HIGH JUMP APPROACH

  • James Becker
  • Dave Kerin
  • Li-Shan Chou
Keywords: high jump, elite athletes, athletic performance

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to examine how well elite high jump athletes run the curved portion of the approach and how deviation from the curve affects parameters related to jump performance. The participants were elite men and women high jumpers competing in the USA Track & Field Olympic Trials. Based on reconstructed coordinates, constant radius curves were fitted to the approach of the jumpers and deviation from the curve on each step was analysed. All athletes demonstrated some degree of deviation from the curve, with the 8th and penultimate steps being the most common sites of maximum deviation. There were significant beneficial relationships between maximum deviation from the curve and the height of the center of mass at plant and vertical velocity at takeoff. However, there were significant detrimental relationships between maximum curve deviation and change in inward lean during the takeoff and distance travelled down the bar. Overall, the results of this study suggest deviation from the curve radius may be mechanisms to help jumpers produce increased vertical velocity at takeoff but it comes at the price of negatively affecting bar clearance.
Authors can retain copyright, while granting the International Society of Biomechanics in Sports (ISBS) the right of first publication.
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High Jump: Technical Aspects

By Steve Patrick, Track & Field Coach, SUNY Cobelskill

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     The high jump is a technical event. While most jumpers feel that the bar clearance is the most important aspect of high jumping, it is not. Just as with the other three jumping events (LJ, TJ, and PV), the runup or approach is probably the most important aspect of the event. In fact, when you look at good junior high jumpers, they often have perfect (or near-perfect) bar clearance technique. What they lack, however, is a perfect approach run.
     Using the flop high jump technique (which is really the only technique used these days), the athlete will run a curved approach towards the bar. The foot on the inside of the turn will be the takeoff foot, and the athlete will actually clear the bar with his/her back facing the bar.

 

      This is really not as difficult as many individuals make it out to be. The main concept with an approach run is to develop a lot of horizontal velocity, directly towards the pit. A sharp, curving turn at the end of the approach run creates rotation, allowing the athlete to jump with his back to the bar. Horizontal velocity pro- vides for two things:

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  1. Translation of increased horizontal velocity into vertical velocity results in greater jump heights.

  2. The greater the horizontal velocity, the farther away an individual can take off, allowing for a more gradual takeoff angle. This is also advantageous because it provides the athlete with more time to reach peak height.

      The approach run shares many characteristics with the approach runs of the other jumping events. It is developed by consistent practice. Ideally, the athlete is at his fastest at the end of the run. The athlete should enter each competition with the ability to "measure off' the starting point of the approach run. The high jump approach is unique, however, in that it curves!
 

      There are a variety of ways to coach athletes to develop the shape of the approach run. They usually fall into one of two categories:

  1. All athletes are required to use the same curve. This is very beneficial when you are working with a large number of athletes, since they will all be following the same curve. They should all begin to turn at the same time, and you as the coach can even trace down an arc for all of your athletes to practice with.

  2. Each athlete uses a curve that is matched "exactly" to his or her abilities. From a biomechanics standpoint, this makes the most sense, as athletes have different stride lengths, speeds, heights, etc. When coaching a great number of high jumpers, this approach is more difficult to manage, though, as each athlete will have his own curve.

      In may respects, this is the easy part of the jump. If the athlete has performed the approach run and the takeoff correctly, there will be little problem with bar clearance. When jumping at higher heights, the athlete needs to be sure to have patience and wait to begin bar clearance when he is high enough for it to be a factor. In essence, he must "wait" for the jump to bring him high enough to have to go over the bar.
     Bar clearance involves trying to "wrap" the body over the bar. Never-the-less, the athlete needs to try to keep as much of the body below the level of the bar at all times. Once the head and shoulders clear the bar, the athlete must arch the back, thrusting the hips towards the sky. The legs should be kept relaxed.
     As the hips clear the bar, the athlete must be sure to maintain his arch, although he can relax slightly. Few things are more frustrating than clearing the bar only to "sit" on it halfway through the jump.
     However, the legs must also clear the bar. Many athletes try to kick the legs out of the way, which sometimes works well. Raising the head, so that the chin is on the chest, is another effective way to move the legs out of the way.

 

      Please keep in mind that to fix a symptom, it is best to fix an underlying cause. Remember that this is by no means a comprehensive list!
     The athlete should be leaning into the turn as he runs the curve. For example, if the turn is to the left, the athlete should be leaning to the left. This is a crucial component to the approach run for the high jump, since overcoming this lean during takeoff creates rotation that allows the athlete to clear the bar.
     The turn should always be started with the jumping foot, which will be the foot on the inside of the turn. Otherwise, a "post pattern" is likely to result. This means that the athlete takes a wider step out with the non- jumping leg, which reduces speed and drastically increases the radius of the turn. This prevents the athlete from leaning into the turn, which reduces rotation at the takeoff.

 

Symptoms and Probable Underlying Cause

 

Jumping leg "collapses"

  • Final step is too long (power jumper)

  • Leg weakness

  • Excessive speed into the jump

Slowing down into the jump

  • The approach start is too fast

  • Lack of confidence

  • Turning with too tight a radius

  • Not leaning into the turn

Knocking off the bar on the way up

  • Takeoff is too close to the bar

  • Jumping at the bar, not straight up

  • Not arching soon enough

Knocking the bar off in the middle of the jump

  • Not arching enough

  • Taking off too far away

Knocking off the bar on the way down

  • Not kicking out soon enough

  • Not enough approach velocity (comes down on bar)

  • Taking off too far away

Not arching enough

  • Weakness of the gluteal and lower back muscles

  • Not dropping head (looking over the shoulder)

Not leaning into the turn

  • Not running fast enough

  • Too wide an approach turn

  • Unstable/uncoordinated

  • Starts turn with non-jumping foot (post pattern)

     The takeoff is obviously crucial in the high jump. You could consider the takeoff to begin as far as three steps away from the actual last point of contact with the ground. Three steps away from the takeoff, both arms should be in front of the body, with the arms nearly fully extended and the hands approximately mid-chest in height.
    The penultimate, or next-to-last, step is a preparatory step. It should be a slightly longer step, and the athlete should slightly lower the hips. He should also bring both hands back at this time, so that both hands are behind the hips, with the arms nearly extended.
     The final step should be a little shorter and quicker than the rest. The athlete should be taking off approximately a full arm's length away from the bar, more if he is extremely fast and skilled. Some athletes (and coaches) feel that power jumpers should have a long last step, so that they have time and the necessary body angles in order to generate a lot of power. Usually, this is incorrect. A shorter, faster step will almost al- ways be more effective once the athlete is proficient at it.
     To watch for so-called power jumpers, look for a drastic decrease in speed (this is bad), a very long last step, and a dragging of the non-jumping leg (because they are slowing down and not raising the center of gravity). Additionally, watch for knee and/or ankle injuries in the jumping leg as the athlete's body responds to all those decelerating forces.
     The takeoff should be short and quick. The lead leg should be raised very quickly and should "block" once the thigh is parallel to the ground. It is important that the lead leg block while the jumping leg is still in contact with the ground. The arms should swing forward and upward and should also block while the jumping leg is still in contact with the ground. For most athletes, this occurs at shoulder level.
     Since every action causes an equal but opposite reaction, this blocking will increase the "push" of the jumping leg off the ground. The athlete should attempt to jump straight up, and not towards the bar--his horizontal velocity and the rotation started by the lean into the turn will cause him to head over the bar. Watch from the side to see if your athletes are hitting the bar on the way up, which is usually a sign that they are jumping toward the bar rather than straight up.
     In order to position the back to the bar, the athlete should look at the far corner of the pit over the shoulder on the same side as the jumping leg.

 

 



Bowerman, W.J. & Freeman. W.H. (). High- Performance Training For Track And Field. Human Kinetics.
Dapena, J. (). "Biomechanical Analysis of the Fosbury Flop." Track Technique, ,
Humphrey, S. & Nordquist, D. (). "High Jump." In USA Track & Field Coaching Manual (Joseph Rogers, Editor). Human Kinetics.
Jacoby, E. & Fraley, B. (). The Complete Book of Jumps. Human Kinetics.

 

FROM: TRACK COACH

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Recommended Resources USA

Related Articles:

High Jump: The Straddle and the Flop

High Jump: Technical Aspects

ROTATION OVER THE BAR IN THE FOSBURY-FLOP

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Finding the Intercept Point

Number of Steps on the Curve

Most senior athlete will use five strides on the curve as this has been found by biomechanists to be the most effective for elite athletes. Junior athletes who are just starting the Fosbury Flop technique might use three or four steps as they develop the strength and technique to effectively run a curve.

Mean Stride Length

This one is a little more difficult to calculate but can be done with a soft measuring tape and a phone or video camera. The best way to do it is to set up the U-Bend drill with the measuring tape close to the runner’s path. The drill should be performed at the same pace and aggression as they would perform a full jump.

Ideally, you will be able to play back the footage and get a good estimate of the mean stride length of your athlete as they run the curve. It can help if you put some bright markers every 50cm on the tape to help make a more accurate estimate.

It’s also important to remember that this will vary considerably as the athlete physically develops and improves their curve running ability.

Foot Angle at Takeoff

This is another one where you’ll need a video recording to make an accurate estimate. Record your athlete performing a full jump and make a note of the angle of their planted foot at take-off in relation to the high jump mat.

The angle should be somewhere between 15 and 30 degrees for most athletes.

Takeoff Point

According to Gary Bourne, the position of the planted foot at takeoff should be approximately cm along the bar and cm out from the bar.

Developing athletes with a slower approach may jump from cm along the bar and cm out from the bar. The desired takeoff position can be marked with a chalk marker to help athletes find their ideal position. The coach should observe clearance of the bar occurring at the highest point of their jump and over the middle of the bar (where the bar is lowest). If this is consistently not occurring, the coach should consider adjusting the takeoff point.

When entering your athlete’s takeoff point into the calculator, ‘X-Distance of Takeoff Foot from Upright‘ refers to how far along the bar the athlete’s planted foot is at takeoff and ‘Y'-Distance of Takeoff Foot from Upright’ refers to the distance of the planted foot out from the upright.

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Finding the Intercept Point

Number of Steps on the Curve

Most senior athlete will use five strides on the curve as this has been found by biomechanists to be the high jump approach radius effective for elite athletes. Junior athletes who are just starting the Fosbury Flop technique might use three or four steps as they develop the strength and technique to effectively run a curve.

Mean Stride Length

This one is a little more difficult to calculate but can be done with a soft measuring tape and a phone or video camera. The best way to do it is to set up the U-Bend drill with the measuring tape close to the runner’s path. The drill should be performed at the same pace and aggression as they would perform a full jump.

Ideally, you will be able to play back the footage and get a good estimate of the mean stride length of your athlete as they run the curve, high jump approach radius. It can help if you put some bright markers every 50cm on the tape to help make a more accurate estimate.

It’s also important to remember that this will vary considerably as the athlete physically develops and improves their curve running ability.

Foot Angle at Takeoff

This is another one where you’ll need a video recording to make an accurate estimate. Record your athlete performing a full jump and make a note of the angle of their planted foot at take-off in relation to the high jump mat.

The angle should be somewhere between 15 and 30 degrees for most athletes.

Takeoff Point

According to Gary Bourne, the position of the planted foot at takeoff should be approximately cm along the bar and cm out from the bar.

Developing athletes with a slower approach may jump from cm along the bar and cm out from the bar. The desired takeoff position can be marked with a chalk marker to help athletes find their ideal position. The coach should observe clearance of the bar occurring at the highest point of their jump and over the middle of the bar (where the bar is lowest). If this is consistently not occurring, the coach should consider adjusting the takeoff point.

When entering your athlete’s takeoff point into the calculator, ‘X-Distance of Takeoff Foot from Upright‘ refers to how far along the bar the athlete’s planted foot is at takeoff and ‘Y'-Distance of Takeoff Foot from Upright’ refers to the distance of the planted foot out from the upright.

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Add 2 Inches high jump approach radius your High Jump with the Intercept Point

This article was written by Todd Acheson, a two-time NCAA DIV II All-American in the High Jump.  If you have any questions about this article, you can email him at tacheson@casinoextra.fr

I firmly believe that this article will add two or more inches to your high jump next season. The calculations are very straight forward and easy to use.

I could go on and on about how well these methods worked for myself and countless others I&#;ve heard from. If I only would have had this while I was in school, I could have been a more successful jumper.

My objective is to give you some valuable information regarding High Jump approach techniques that I believe will benefit you high jump approach radius your athletes.

Mutaz Essa Barshim High Jump overlay

Assumptions

As a high jumper, it is assumed you will be using the flop method of jumping.

The curve portion of the approach that the jumper runs is CIRCULAR.

The high jump standards are fixed points of reference. Once measurements are obtained, these two objects should never be moved during the course of competition or during practice.

The concepts presented here can be considered a common sense approach to high jumping. Like most challenges in sports, you may not be able to teach your body to do what your mind wants it to do, overnight. Practice is the only way to develop high jump approach radius principals. It may take months or years for an athlete to really feel comfortable with their approach. In order for you to see success with this program, you must practice with determination and diligence.

Approach Characteristics

Everything you do up to the point of take-off is very important. Why? Because it is the main factor that will determine how successful your bar clearance will be. 90% of the jump is in the approach! The high jump is difficult to perform, due to the high jump approach radius that a high jumper must run a curve. This curve makes the high jump much more complex, when compared to the long jump and triple jump approaches. You need to be consistent when you run your curve. It is of my firm belief that you must run the proper approach, so that your body will be in the correct position at the point of take-off, high jump approach radius. If you can put yourself in the correct position at take-off consistently, you&#;ll have more attempts, and a better probability of making higher heights. Once you get comfortable with a consistent approach, you can practice and concentrate on other aspects of your jump, such as a knee drive, hip rotation, table tennis coventry, penultimate step, etc.

What is the correct position at take-off? As a high jumper, you must run your curve with inward lean, that is, your body must be leaning toward the center of the circle you are running. And, MOST IMPORTANTLY, you must maintain that lean as you plant your take-off foot and attempt to high jump approach radius bar clearance, high jump approach radius. If you don&#;t do this, you might as well run straight at the bar without a circular approach. The whole idea behind a circular approach is to have inward lean at the point of take-off.

With that in mind, the main purpose of this web site is to help you develop consistency in your approach from start to take-off. Remember, in regards to the physical components of jumping, 90% of your jump lies in your approach!! Read the contents of this web site very carefully, so that you understand the concepts involved.

Your high jump approach can be viewed as similar to a long or triple jump approach. In the long or triple jump, you have a start point and an end point (take-off point). If done correctly, your last step will be on the board, and a successful jump will be obtained. Let&#;s carry this concept over to the high jump, high jump approach radius, and take a close look at the four(4) basic components of the approach.

  1. Take-off point
    Most jumpers will find themselves at a point about feet from the standard along the crossbar. This distance is called XSTD. From that point on the crossbar, you will be somewhere between and feet perpendicular measured out, depending upon high jump approach radius speed and jumping ability. This distance is called YSTD. Typically, the higher you jump, the further away from the crossbar (YSTD) you will find yourself when you plant your take-off foot.
  2. Take-off angle
    Next, you will choose your take-off angle. Jumpers will sometimes say that their take-off leg feels like it collapses when they plant and try to jump. One cause of this &#;collapse&#; is a take-off high jump approach radius that is close to degrees, or possibly even parallel. It should NEVER be parallel!!! This is very important!! A good starting point is to be somewhere between 15 and 30 degrees. This is a variable that you will play with until you find one that works well.
  3. Number of Steps on the Curve
    Now you need to decide how many steps you will take on the curve portion of your approach. It is recommended that you use five (5) steps as your starting point. Do not change this, unless advised by your coach. Biomechanists have found that five steps is ideally what a jumper should be using.
  4. Stride Length
    Your stride length makes you unique from every other jumper. This is the main variable that determines your approach. Your stride length on a curve determines how much distance you can cover in 5 steps. You will need to obtain a measurement of your stride length, while running a curve, high jump approach radius. To accomplish this, you will need someone to assist you. Using a tape measure, mark a circle with radius of about 25 ft. (for high school athletes and above). Then run this circle with the same tempo and rhythm you would normally use for your actual high jump approach. Remember to maintain inward lean while you do this. Have an assistant watch where each step lands on the circle&#;s perimeter. You will then measure the distance between these steps. Add the distances together and divide by the number of measurements you make. The result is your average stride length. You only need to take about steps on a portion of this circle to obtain the measurements.

With these four (4) variable defined, you can now use some applied math to find a very, very good approximation of the intercept point where an athlete should be starting their approach curve. This is the key to achieving consistency!!!!

The Intercept Point

What is the intercept point?

This is the point on the track, unique to each jumper, where the approach curve starts. The location of this point is dependent upon the 4 components of your approach. Changing any of those 4 components, will change the location of your intercept point.

This point is actually located by measuring &#;X&#; from the standard closest to your takeoff point, and then measuring &#;Y&#; outward and perpendicular from &#;X&#.

Most jumpers do this anyway to find their start point, only now, you will find the point at which your curve begins. Once you locate this point, you will be well on your way to higher heights. You find your intercept point based on the variables you defined in the previous section.

It&#;s not enough to have a starting point marked on the track. The starting point is only secondary to the intercept point. As long as you hit your intercept point with each approach, high jump approach radius, your jumping will become more consistent. More consistency means a better probability at clearing higher heights.

After all, that&#;s what high jump approach radius all about, high jump approach radius, HIGHER HEIGHTS!

(Click on the images below to enlarge)

High Jump Intercept Point 1

High Jump Intercept Point 2

 

High Jump Intercept Point 3

High Jump Intercept Point 4

 

Calculate your Intercept Point

You need to find 5 variables:

Enter STRIDE length: __ (Inches)
Enter number of STEPS on the curve: __ steps
Enter XSTD (distance along the standard to takeoff): __ (Inches)
Enter YSTD (distance of takeoff foot from standard): __ (Inches)
Enter your takeoff ANGLE: __ (Degrees)

Download the Calculator

Here is the Microsoft Excel spreadsheet for off-line formula calculations:  Intercept Point(Windows users: right-click mouse and choose &#;Save as&#.  Mac users: hold CMD key while clicking)

Example Application

Let&#;s say that we want to find Johnny Jumper&#;s Intercept Point. First we want to find his stride length. Johnny&#;s coach draws a circle with some chalk and a tape measure on the ground. Johnny then runs the circle a few times while his coach marks his steps and measures the distance between them. From those 5 or 6 measurements, the coach finds the average stride length of Johnny, which is 6&#;-4&#;(76&#;).

Next, the coach finds his takeoff point, relative to the closest high jump standard. This is done by taking two separate measurements. The first is taken from the base of the post on the standard to the point directly perpendicular from the takeoff point, and the second is taken from that point to the takeoff point, high jump approach radius. The first measurement is 12&#; and the second is 36&#.

Next, high jump approach radius, Johnny&#;s coach knows that the takeoff angle to start working with will be somewhere between 15 and 40 degrees, high jump approach radius, depending on the athlete. He decides to start with 30 degrees and make adjustments from there.

Finally, high jump approach radius, Johnny&#;s coach knows that Johnny will need to take 5 steps on the curve.
With these five variables, we can plug them into the software and find out where Johnny&#;s Intercept Point is.

RESULTS

We find the Intercept Point by measuring X distance from the standard closest to the takeoff point. From that point we measure Y distance to find the actual Intercept Point. In this example, we find that Johnny&#;s Intercept Point has the following measurements:
X = 14&#;-2&#; and Y = 29&#;-3&#; with an actual radius of 30&#;&#;

After finding the Intercept Point, Johnny now &#;hits&#; this point with his non-jumping foot each time he runs his approach.

Testimonials

Mar 1st &#; Peter Hlavin*, Top 5 World Ranking () – Masters Track & Field (M)

&#;For &#;Fosbury Flop&#; style high jumpers, developing a personalized and repeatable curve is of utmost importance. The Acheson curve calculator takes a lot of the guesswork out of developing a solid approach, high jump approach radius. Not only has the curve calculator generated immediate results for me, but also for the high school and youth kids that I coach.&#;

Feb 28th &#; Kathy Bergen, W World Record Holder

&#;My high jump approach was always an adventure. In the short time that I have been using Todd Acheson’s curve calculator, my approach and speed are much more consistent. At my first meet in I jumped higher than I have in four years … and set a world age group record.&#;

*Thanks to Peter Hlavin to spotting some inconsistencies between the calculations calculated on this page vs. the Excel document that you can download and use offline.

Category iconHigh Jump,  Track & FieldTag iconTodd Acheson

Источник: [casinoextra.fr]

High Jump Approach Mapping &#; A New Way to Develop A Consistent High Jump Approach [ARTICLE]

By: Dusty Jonas

Originally Published in: Techniques Magazine

Provided by: USTFCCCA

When Dick Fosbury introduced the world to the "flop" high jump technique at the Olympic Games it became the gold standard for high jumping from beginners to Olympic champions. The "Fosbury Flop" has gained popularity through the years due to its simplicity to learn and its efficiency over the previously used straddle, roll, or scissors techniques.

Development of an approach that is specific to each individual is of the utmost importance in order for a jumper to clear the highest bars efficiently while avoiding unnecessary injury in the process.

A non-debatable fact about using a curved approach is its purpose: To create inward lean and centripetal force. The resulting forces after takeoff create a twisting backwards somersault that allows the athlete to twist their back to the bar while simultaneously rotating the body over it (Dapena & Ficklin, ). By doing this efficiently it is possible for a jumpers center of mass (COM) to potentially pass below the bar meaning that the athlete does not have to jump as high to successfully clear the bar. These principles will be used to answer the question of where to begin developing a high jump approach.

For the purposes of this article a 10 stride "J" style run up will be used. This includes a five-stride acceleration on a straight line and a five stride portion on a curve. My goal for this article is for you to be able to map out a full approach and quantify several useful pieces that are often neglected: The attack angle at of the end of the approach and the arc length.

PREVIOUSLY USED METHODS

The two most widely used approach development methods are: the "J" run back, and straight line approaches that are transferred onto a curve. There are inconsistencies with each of these methods that may lead to technical issues later in the athlete's development.

The "J" run back is performed by an athlete starting at a takeoff point an arm's length away from the bar and running back in the shape of the letter J. This approach is difficult to replicate with any consistency and using this technique requires the athlete to accelerate on a curve rather than a straight line.

The straight line approach is performed by the athlete running five steps in a straight line at the speed that they feel that they could successfully execute a jump, high jump approach radius. After trials, high jump approach radius, the average of the measurement is taken. The athlete is then asked to run the full ten steps on the same line, marking the average distance of the tenth or takeoff step in the same manner as before. The two measurements are taken to the apron where the athlete and coach estimate a distance from the standard and a radius length to fit. Using this method can result in hours of guesswork regarding the curved portion of the approach. Any radius that is decided upon by the coach will be purely conjecture and will more than likely not be executed correctly for quite some time, if ever.

APPROACH MECHANICS

The process begins with discussing what makes the flop so effective: the curve.

The two main reasons to run a curve in the high jump are to lower the athlete's COM and to facilitate rotation around the bar in flight (Kerin, ). The curve an athlete runs in a high jump approach is determined by several different factors such as age, body morphology, strength levels, speed, and experience. The most important thing to remember is that regardless of the curve an athlete runs, it should be run correctly with good curve running mechanics.

Using this method of approach development means that it is very important to explain what the term "good curve running mechanics" means. The goal of the first five strides of the approach is to develop as much horizontal velocity as can be maintained through the next five strides on the curve into takeoff.

The mechanics of the first five strides are consistent with a normal acceleration pattern and upright sprint mechanics. If the athletes have not developed sufficient horizontal velocity prior to entering the curve they may try to accelerate while running the curve. The mechanics and postures involved in acceleration are much different than those desired while running the curved portion of the approach and these may contribute to the athlete deviating from the curve (Becker, Kerin & Chou, ).

The goal of the second half of the approach is to run a curve with the greatest amount of controllable horizontal velocity with as much inward lean as possible and still be able to safely execute the jump (Dapena, McDonald &amp Cappaert, ). When high jump approach radius athlete begins to run a curve, the forces being exerted through the ground are no longer just vertical, they are also lateral, high jump approach radius. This means that the smaller the radius is, the more difficult it is to stay on the curve in a giant dragon table tennis table review stride pattern with speed without deviating from it (Chang & Kram, ).

1
2

It is highly possible that a deviation from the curve is one of the biggest contributing factors to an athlete missing the bar. Deviations from the curve result in the loss of inward lean which will inhibit the facilitation of rotation around the bar. Research also shows that the loss of inward lean contributes to longer times spent on top of the bar by way of distance traveled down the bar during flight (Becker, Kerin &amp Chou, ). See Figure 1 for proper and improper curve running mechanics.

Teaching an athlete how to run a technically correct curve is the best way to start developing a high jump approach.

Running A Technically Correct Curve Results In

• High vertical velocity off of the ground relative to the athlete

• Back rotating to the bar

• Fast somersaulting over the bar

• Short time spent over the bar

THE CIRCLE DRILL

The best way to teach an athlete a skill is by doing drills that are specific to the event. This method of approach development starts with a drill that is modified from the long-utilized circle drill. It is performed by having the athlete run, skip, or jump around various sized circles.

Things to Remember When Selecting A Radius Size

• Radius size is dependent on the great-est high jump approach radius of controllable inward lean and horizontal velocity

• High velocity + high strength level = LARGER radius

• Low velocity + low strength level = SMALLER radius

• Experiment with different sizes, high jump approach radius, drills, and speeds

Table 1 shows the variety of radius distances by elite high jump approach radius and women high jump approach radius over time (Dapena, ).

The collegiate men that I coach do well on a 35'' radius and women on high jump approach radius. These are just suggestions and may be adjusted as the athlete progresses.

3

Begin the setup of the drill by drawing three different half circles on the track with different radius measurements that are all connected at the same mid mark. Radius measurements of 30', 35', high jump approach radius, and 40' are most often selected as these distances cover the entire range for men and women. Smaller or larger radius measurements may be chosen to suit the needs of varying skill level athletes.

There is some degree of trial and error that the athlete and coach will experience until a radius is found that fits well and that can be executed correctly. Experiment with different radius sizes until one is found that fits the athlete best. The layout for the circle drill is shown in Figure 2.

Once the different radii have been drawn on the track the athlete is asked to do a variety of drills on the different sized half circles. After mastering curve running technique on the chosen radius, the straight line portion of the approach is added.

The straight line portion of the approach is added by having the athlete start on the mid mark and run back five strides in the same acceleration pattern that they would use on a normal high jump approach. Using Figure 2 as reference, a left footed jumper would run to the right side on the guideline and a right chipstead place lawn tennis club jumper would do the opposite.

Have the athlete run as many repetitions as needed to get a consistent starting point for the beginning of the approach. Once a consistent mark is achieved, have the athlete run from the new starting point to the high jump approach radius mark and check to make sure that it is still consistent.

Once the athlete is consistently hitting the mid mark, they are to continue running around whichever radius has been selected. Having three different sized radii going through the same mid mark allows a large group of athletes to work on the same set up. Limit the number of radii to three, as any more can be difficult to differentiate visually for the athlete. Using different colored chalk for each radius makes them much easier to see.

What this drill effectively does is take an entire high jump approach away from the apron and allows the athlete and coach to experiment with different radius measurements to see which radius the athlete runs optimally, high jump approach radius. This drill is continued for a period of a few weeks or until the athlete and coach have experimented with various radius distances and speeds.

4
5
6

Once the athlete and coach are comfortable with the chosen radius it is time to begin developing an approach using the same drill.

APPROACH DEVELOPMENT

Once a radius is decided upon, draw the drill on the ground with the chosen radius in the same manner that is shown in Figure 2.

When the drill is chalked down on the track and measured, be sure that there is a guideline to help ensure that it is set up as squarely as possible. This will help with the collection of accurate data later. The first mark that will be determined is the starting point of the approach. This process is the same as previously discussed in the circle drill, high jump approach radius. The athlete should be able to run repetitions within inches of each other before advancing.

Once a consistent starting point has been established the athlete is asked to run the full ten stride approach around the selected radius, high jump approach radius. It is important that the athlete is consistent on the previously established marks. After the athlete has run full approaches within approximately six inches of each other the most consistent mark will be used to establish the takeoff point. See Figure 3 for illustration of the different marks.

Measurements will need to be taken when both points are established and marked. It is recommended that both metric and imperial measurements be taken to allow for easier calculations later, high jump approach radius. Using a spreadsheet to help organize your data is very helpful. An example is provided below in Table 2 with completed data. The data being used in Table 2 is from a male jumper that will be referred to as Athlete 1.

See Figure 4 for measurements taken from Athlete 1.

Three of the cells in Table 2 have intentionally been left blank since there is not enough data thus far to complete it. The current measurements show the distance of the actual approach but does not take into account the takeoff distance from the bar nor the distance down the bar that the athlete will take off. A general rule for takeoff distance away from the bar is an arm's length. Experience has shown that 3 feet for women and 4 feet for men works well but the coach and athlete may experiment with what is comfortable. I prefer one foot up to 18 inches down the bar at takeoff and for the purpose of this article 18 inches will be used.

These measurements will make it possible to calculate "Distance D + Takeoff Distance" and "Actual C Distance". This will begin to answer the question "How far out from the standard should I be?" The answer: It depends on the size of the radius and the speed at which it is run.

See below for instructions on rugby manager apk to calculate these distances with data from Figure 4.

To map the approach some inexpensive tools will be needed: A compass, protractor, an engineer's scale, and graph paper.

At this point, all of the data that is needed to draw the full approach map has been gathered. Using graph paper to draw the full approach map is especially helpful for keeping the measurements square.

Once the map is drawn on paper it gives the coach a visual reference to check the direction of the run up and calculate the arc length.

Using an engineer's scale is very simple since every inch is broken up into powers of ten up to sixtieths. The tenths scale is the only scale to be used in this process. Using the tenths scale, 1" = 10'. For example, if the radius is 38 feet, it would be scaled down to inches.

7

Since measurements were taken in metric and imperial, the data can be scaled down using the imperial system while still having numbers in metric to do easy math with.

It is very helpful to draw the pit and standards to provide a reference to start drawing from. Here is how to do it step by step in the order that I prefer. You may draw or measure the approach any way that suits your style. The measurements used will be from Figure 6.

1. Begin by drawing the Actual C Distance or 16'1". This will be a measurement of inches using the engineers scale. Start measuring at the middle of the standard as illustrated in Figure 6. Since the scale only works in tenths you may use inches.

2. Draw the line that indicates Distance D + Takeoff Distance or 67'". This will be a measurement of inches high jump approach radius the engineers scale.

3. Mark the mid mark by starting at the starting point and measure 31' or " towards the standard on your paper. This is Distance A.

4. Now mark the takeoff point. Using this example 18" down the bar is allowed while taking off 4' away from the bar. These scaled measurements north east grape pickers football be inches down the bar and .4 inches away from the bar.

5. Draw a line for Distance B, or chord length, from the mid mark to the takeoff point. In this case, high jump approach radius is 36'" or inches. This is also the time where previous measurements can be checked. If the chord length does not equal inches on your scale an error may have occurred while drawing previous measurements.

6. The center of the circle, or origin, high jump approach radius, must be found. The radius is the distance from the center of the circle to any point on it. The point to be drawn on paper will be the point where the radius length is equal from the origin to the mid mark and the origin to the takeoff point. Notice in Figure 6 that these two lines are of equal length.

7. Draw the radius with the compass. The needle point of the compass will be placed at the origin point and the pencil will be placed on the mid mark. If you have measured correctly it will pass through the takeoff point that was drawn in step 4.

8. Measure the origin angle. This is done by using the clear protractor.

9. Measure the angle at the end of the run. This is done by placing the vertex of the clear protractor on the takeoff point with the radius line to the origin point oriented at 90° perpendicular to the takeoff. Next place a mark even with the high jump approach radius of the protractor. You may then draw a line from the takeoff point to the mark you just made. You will now have a tangent line from the radius, high jump approach radius. To get the angle of attack, simply measure this line in relation to the front of the high jump pit. See the full approach map for a representation of this line.

See Figure 6 for the full approach map of Athlete 1.

Once the approach map is drawn I would recommend taking the time to analyze it. If the angle of the run up is too shallow or steep paintball duffle bag radius may have to be adjusted. For pole dance outfit level of jumper that I have coached, I find that angles of 30°° (33 ± 3°) have been the high jump approach radius effective for women and angles of 35°° (36° ± 5°) have been most effective for the men. These angles at the end of the run fit my philosophy of the high jump and should only kevin barham baseball taken as suggestions, high jump approach radius. I encourage everyone to experiment with different radius measurements and angles to see which fit the individual athletes best.

Once satisfied with the measurements the arc length can now be calculated using a simple equation using data from Athlete 1.

The arc length will not be discussed in detail because to do so would result in going into a great amount of detail regarding the technical model. I do believe that it has some significance since it shows the actual distance run by an athlete around the curve. This measurement can lend itself to timing possibilities if one has access to capable timing equipment.

8
9

Once the coach is satisfied with the result of the full approach map, make note of the measurements that the athlete will used when transferring the approach to the apron for practice or competition, high jump approach radius. There are three measurements that are taken and I prefer to measure them in this order: 1) Distance out from the standard 2) The full approach distance and 3) The mid mark.

Using the full approach map, Athlete 1 would have these measurements:

1) 16'1" out from the standard

2) 67'" back to the starting point and

3) 35'" to the mid mark.

The distance from the down mark to the mid mark is achieved by taking the difference between "Distance D + Takeoff Distance" and "Distance A".

This method of approach development will give the coach and athlete a chance to experiment and work together on what improves mechanics, positions and corresponding results. I believe that it is a superior alternative to approach development as compared to other methods specifically with regards to the curve and radius measurement. It has also resurrection high school basketball me hours of practice time in the process. Since it gives a more precise measurement of where an athletes approach should be, the changes high jump approach radius are made are very small. There may be a change of a few high jump approach radius instead of changing a few feet from practice to practice. This means more practice time devoted to being able to teach a skill with consistency and less time in a trial and error search.

As the athlete masters an approach, do not be afraid to experiment with new measurements. Changes to the approach will likely happen throughout an athlete's career based on maturity, strength, speed, and technical mastery. I think it is beneficial to be able to keep a record of approach maps on individuals to see how they progress over their careers.

REFERENCES

Becker, J., Kerin, D., & Chou, high jump approach radius, L. (). Consequences of Deviation From the Curve Radius In The High Jump Approach. Taipei, Taiwan: Conference of the International Society of Biomechanics in Sports.

Chang, Y. & Kram, R. (). Limitations to maximum running speed on flat curves, high jump approach radius. Journal Of Experimental Biology, (6), http:casinoextra.fr

Dapena, J, high jump approach radius. (). How to design the shape of a high jump run-up. Track High jump approach radius, (),

Dapena, J. & Ficklin, T. (), high jump approach radius. High Jump Report #32 (Men) (pp.24). Indianapolis: USA Track and Field.

Dapena, J., McDonald, C., & Cappaert, J. (). A REGRESSION ANALYSIS OF HIGH JUMPING

TECHNIQUE. Medicine & Science In Sports & Exercise, high jump approach radius, 22(2), S http:casinoextra.fr

Kerin, D. (). The Curve Run & US High Jump. Presentation.

Dusty Jonas is an assistant coach at the University of Nebraska where he has coached nine Big 10 champions in the High Jump. High jump approach radius his own very successful competitive career at Nebraska, Jonas competed high jump approach radius Team USA a total of eight times in his career, including the Olympic Games and the World Indoor Championships where he earned a bronze medal.

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The following Dissected High Jump Approach information is largely made of my interpretation of high jump technique written and published by David Kerin, former USATF chair, successful collegiate and HS coach, requested speaker, and published author. 

My high jump technique comprehension was above average before my exposure to Mr. Kerin&#;s ideas. I&#;ve previously coached many local youth champions with sound fundamentals. Since applying Mr, high jump approach radius. Kerin&#;s ideas at my summer jumps clinic however, one student improved his PR by 6&#. Another student improved her PR by 8&#.



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  1. Generate speed
  2. Make twist
  3. Generate centripetal force
  4. Create lift
  5. Generate backward summersault

Generating Speed

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Embed high jump approach radius Getty Images

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Step 5

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High Jump Takeoff

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High Jump Video Analysis

$

  1. High jump approach analysis
  2. Running form analysis
  3. Penultimate step analysis
  4. J Approach analysis
  5. Takeoff analysis
  6. Flight analysis
  7. Top three opportunities for improvement
  8. Top three strengths
  9. High jump drill recommendations for you to eliminate your opportunities

Here&#;s a sample of what you&#;ll get:

High Jump Life Takeoff Analysis Illustration

Related

Источник: [casinoextra.fr]

CONSEQUENCES OF DEVIATION FROM THE CURVE RADIUS IN THE HIGH JUMP APPROACH

  • James Becker
  • Dave Kerin
  • Li-Shan Chou
Keywords: high jump, elite athletes, athletic performance

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to examine how well elite high jump athletes run the curved portion of the approach and how deviation from the curve affects parameters related to jump performance. The participants were elite men and women high jumpers competing in the USA Track & Field Olympic Trials. Based on reconstructed coordinates, constant radius curves were fitted to the approach of the jumpers and deviation from the curve on each step was analysed. All athletes demonstrated some degree of deviation from the curve, with the 8th and penultimate steps being the most common sites of maximum deviation. There were significant beneficial relationships between maximum deviation from the curve and the height of the center of mass at plant and vertical velocity at takeoff. However, there were significant detrimental relationships between maximum curve deviation and change in inward lean during the takeoff and distance travelled down the bar. Overall, the results of this study suggest deviation from the curve radius may be mechanisms to help jumpers produce increased vertical velocity at takeoff but it comes at the price of negatively affecting bar clearance.
Authors can retain copyright, while granting the International Society of Biomechanics in Sports (ISBS) the right of first publication.
Источник: [casinoextra.fr]

4 Simple Steps To Measure A Basic High Jump Approach

The approach run is the key to the &#;flop&#; style high jump.

The approach sets up a young athlete&#;s flight path and, if performed properly, allows the jumper to rotate correctly in the air over the crossbar.

A good run-up will also allow an athlete to take off at a distance from the crossbar that results in the peak height of the jump occurring directly above the crossbar, high jump approach radius. Too close a take-off risks the athlete hitting the bar on the way up. Too far away from the bar can lead to the athlete hitting the bar on the way down.

A &#;flop&#; high jump approach follows a basic J-shaped curve where the first few steps of the run-up are performed in a straight line and the last few are performed on a smooth curve.

Landing Mat

A &#;flop&#; approach follows a J-shaped curve

The straight part of the run-up is used to build up speed, high jump approach radius, and the curve is used to build up forces that will allow the athlete to rotate correctly over the bar.

An 8 to 12 stride approach is suitable for most young athletes. My preference is a 9 or 10 stride run-up. An athlete will use a 9-stride approach if they start with their take-off foot behind at the beginning of their run-up. They will use a stride approach if they start with their take-off foot in front.

Measuring Out a J-Curve High Jump Run-Up

There is no definitive or best way to measure out a high jump run-up. All coaches and athletes will have their individual preference. The steps outlined below will act as a simple starting point for a young athlete.

The following sequence assumes that the athlete has already worked out whether they will be running in from the left or right-hand-side of the landing mats. (An athlete taking off from their right foot will approach from the left side. An athlete taking off from their left foot will approach from the right side).

Step 1

Standing with their back to the nearest upright, the athlete takes three normal walking paces directly away from the upright in a direction that is perpendicular to the crossbar.

High Jump Run Up - Stage 1

Take 3 paces away from the upright.

Step 2

The athlete turns 90 degrees outwards and takes two normal walking paces in a direction that would be parallel to the crossbar.

Copy of High Jump Run Up - Part 2 (2)

Take 2 paces outwards

Step 3

The athlete turns 90 degrees away from the landing area and takes another four normal walking paces. They place a check mark at this point.

High Jump Run Up - 5 Steps (2)

Take another 4 paces away from the mats

This should place the athlete at the starting point for a 5-stride curved approach to the bar. This also marks the point at which the athlete will begin the curved part of their run-up when using a full-length approach.

High JUmp Run Up - Full 5 Strides Approach

A 5-stride approach

Step 4

To measure out a full 9 or stride run-up the athlete simply runs another 4 or 5 strides away from the landing area and marks this as the run-up starting point.

The full approach begins with 4 or 5 strides in a straight line and then the final 5 strides on the curve. The athlete should run around the outside of the check marks.

High Jump Run Up - Full 9 strides

A full 9 or stride approach

The athlete and/or coach can then adjust the run-up starting point and check marks as required.

Summary

  1. Take three paces away from the nearest upright.
  2. Turn 90 degrees and take two paces outwards.
  3. Turn 90 degrees and take another four paces away from the landing mats.
  4. Run another strides away from the mats.

Do you have any high jump run-up measuring tips?

I would love for you to share any other methods or tips that may help young athletes measure out their high jump run-up. You can do this by leaving a reply/comment or by using the below contact details.

Further reading

Articles:

4 Ways to Ruin a High Jump Run-Up

Books:

Winning Jumps and Pole Vault from Amazon US Store

High Jump Drills from Amazon US Store

Fundamentals of Track and Field from Amazon US Store

There are links on this page from which Coaching Young Athletes can earn a small commission, high jump approach radius. This adds no cost to you but helps to keep this blog sustainable. I really appreciate if you do purchase through my links. Thanks for your support. Darren

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