Lacrosse field positions diagram

lacrosse field positions diagram

Attackers: The main job of these four players is to score goals. Spending the majority of their time in the offensive 2/3rds of the field, these. Learn the Positions of Lacrosse · Lacrosse Positions · Box Lacrosse Positions and Field Lacrosse Positions · Lacrosse Goaltender or Goalie. Click here to: see a basic diagram of the playing field. LACROSSE POSITIONS. Lacrosse is played with 10 players. 3 Attackmen; 3 Midfielders; 3.

Lacrosse field positions diagram - really. happens

Lacrosse Rules

THE OBJECT

The object of lacrosse is to score the most points. Points are scored when a player kicks, nudges, bats with the stick, or throws with their stick the very hard tennis sized rubber ball into the opponents net. Players cannot use their hands to throw the ball into the net.

BOYS LACROSSE RULES

LENGTH OF PLAY

Games are divided into four timed quarters. The length of the quarter depends on the age group of the game being played.

  • Youth quarters are typically 8 minutes long.
  • High School quarters are 12 minutes.
  • College, Pro, and International games have 15 minute quarters.

At the end of each quarter teams must switch ends.

When time runs out at the end of the fourth quarter the team with the most points wins. Ties are decided by sudden death playoffs.

FIELD LAYOUT

The basic layout of a lacrosse field utilizing NCAA rules is yards long by 60 yards wide. As compared to a football field which is yards including the end zones by 53 1/3 yards wide. Lacrosse rules have been modified for most high school and youth organizations, so that a standard american football field can be utilized. Goal nets are 6&#; x 6&#; and reside within a 9&#; circle called the crease. The net is positioned 15 yards from the end line giving about yards between the back of the crease and the end line.

Click here to: see a basic diagram of the playing field.

LACROSSE POSITIONS

Lacrosse is played with 10 players.

  • 3 Attackmen
  • 3 Midfielders
  • 3 Defenders
  • 1 Goalie

Click here to: see a diagram of the positions on the field.

BASIC PLAY

Play begins with a face off in the center Face-off square or circle. The lacrosse face off is similar to a hockey face off. Two opponents face each other and try to win possession of the ball. The lacrosse face off is different because the two players basically start on their hands and feet with their sticks laying along the center line, and the ball between the heads of the sticks. At the officials signal each player can employ a number of different lacrosse face off skills and tactics to win possession of the ball, but there is no substitute for being quick or powerful. Most often the ball will be knocked or passed to a player other than the two fighting for the ball in the face off. Once a player is able to pick the ball up with their stick possession occurs. The object is to get close enough to the opponents net to throw the ball into the net scoring a goal. A goal counts as one point. In Major League (professional) Lacrosse there is a two point line where goals shot from behind that line score two points, but that is the only place the two point rule is in effect.

Offensive players maneuver down the field toward the goal by running with or passing the ball to a team mate. Players can run the entire length of the field as long as they are not offside&#;s by not leaving enough players in the defensive casinoextra.frive players cannot enter the crease area that surrounds the goal. The crease is a circle that surrounds the goal and it is where the goalie works.  Defensive players can enter the crease area. If an offensive player enters the crease, it is a crease violation and position goes to the opponent. Offensive layers cannot go into their own crease either unless they gain possession while in the crease they can take the ball out.

TRANSITION TIMING

If the goalie makes a save and gains possession of the ball he must pass or take the ball out of the crease within 4 seconds or the ball will be awarded back to the opponent.

As the ball is transitioned from the defensive end toward the offensive end the offensive team has 20 seconds to cross midfield. Once they cross midfield they have 10 seconds to move into the attackarea. These time restrictions help greatly to keep teams from going into a shell. They must move the ball or possession is lost.

UNIQUE RULES

One of the real different rules in lacrosse is that when a player takes a shot and the ball travels out of bounds the team that is closest to the line where the ball went out of bounds has possession. Often the offense will position a player behind the goal so that when a shot is made they will be closest to the spot where the ball went out of bounds when the ball goes out of bounds. You will also see the goalie sprint toward the back line when a shot is made to try to be the closest to the line so that the defensive team will gain possession. The stick is not an extension of the player, but the hand is, and players will thrust their stick toward the line to be closest.

Another fantastic rule is that after a score there is a face off. So the team who just scored could easily gain possession again by winning the face off and this leads to runs where a team may score several unanswered goals which allows a team to come back and it is one of the reasons why lacrosse is such a tremendously exciting game.

In the final two minutes of the game the team that is ahead must play with the provision that they must stay within the attack zone. Failure to stay in the attack zone constitutes offensive delay of game and possession will be transferred to the losing team. This only applies to the team that is ahead.

THE POSSESSION

During a face off teams are required to keep four players including the goalie behind their own defensive restraining line, and three attackers behind the offensive restraining line. During the face off the 3 midfielders from each side fight for possession of the ball. Once a player picks the ball up with his stick and controls it possession occurs and the defensive players may now move forward to the midfield line if they so choose and attackers may move back to the midfield line as well if they so choose, but teams must maintain 4 defensive players in their own half of the field during play and three attack men on the offensive half of the field. It does not matter which of the players stay on which half as long as 4 defensive players and three attack are maintained at all times. Defensive players are allowed to go on the attack including the goalie as long as a midfielder stays behind to keep the number of defenders at 4. If a defender crosses the midfield line and the number of defenders in their own end is less than four, offside&#;s occurs and possession is awarded to the opponent. Likewise if an offensive player leaves the offensive half of the field and a midfielder does not stay behind to keep the number of offensive players at least three. This aspect of the game allows for creative transition play. Defenders can initiate a fast break as long as a midfielder stays behind. In today&#;s lacrosse world more and more teams especially at the higher levels are developing specialist midfielders that play strictly offense or defense, and do not transition from defense to attack and visa versa. Personally, while I understand the reasons why this is happening and the very diverse skills that are required at either end, I am greatly saddened because for me one of the most exciting plays in Lacrosse is the fast break involving the long stick defensemen or midfielder or even on a rare occasion the goalie taking the ball the length of the field and scoring or setting up a fast break goal.  It can kind of be related to the days in football when players played both ways. Today that almost never happens in college or pro football, but it used to be very common. We are heading in a similar direction with lacrosse and this generation may be the last to see the really tremendous complete midfield players who are equally adept on both ends of the field.  I hope that is not true.

THE CHECK

The game of lacrosse is very physical and contact is very much a part of the game. Being aggressive and physical is a very good quality to have. Checking is a basic lacrosse skill. There are two different types of check that can be employed. Stick Checks and Body checks. Stick checks can be made as long as the attempt is to try to contact the opponents stick. And in some of the older aged divisions body checks can happen as long as the check is to the body above the waist and below the neck.

The goal of the game is to score the most goals, but the real challenge is in maintaining possession of the ball until a shot can be made. Once a player establishes possession keeping it is not easy.  Defending players attack the stick of the player in possession and try to knock the ball loose with their own stick. This is called stick checking. They can also hit the ball carrier or anyone within 5 yards of a loose ball with their shoulder like a football block. This is called a body check and is legal as long as it not from behind, above the waist, and below the shoulder.

If you are looking for how to play lacrosse information on a particular skill go to Lacrosse Skills.

If you are looking for how to play lacrosse information on how to coach a particular skill go to Lacrosse Drills.

PENALTIES

There are two types of penalties: Technical fouls and Personal fouls.

Personal fouls &#; Slashing, Tripping, Illegal Cross Checking, and checking from behind a player are usually given 1 minute penalties. Penalties can be increased to 2 or 3 minutes or even ejection can be assessed for major or especially sever personal fouls.

Technical fouls such as &#; Offside&#;s, Crease violations, pushing from the rear, thumbing. and Warding Off constitute a loss of possession.

PLAYING A MAN DOWN

When a personal foul penalty occurs and a one minute (or longer) penalty is assessed the offending player is remove to the penalty area in front of the scorers table. The player must remain in the penalty area until the penalty has been served.

You can find an official rule book at the US lacrosse web site and check with your particular association for specific rules.

GIRLS LACROSSE RULES

FIELD POSITIONS

  • FIRST HOME
    The first home&#;s responsibility is to score. Located in front of the goal, the first home must continually cut toward the goal for a shot, or cut away from the goal to make room for another player. She should have excellent stickwork.
  • SECOND HOME
    The second home is considered the playmaker. She should be able to shoot well from every angle and distance from the goal
  • THIRD HOME
    The third home&#;s responsibility is to transition the ball from defense to attack. She should be able to feed the ball to other players and fill in wing areas.
  • ATTACK WINGS
    The wings are also responsible for transitioning the ball from defense to attack. Wings should have speed and endurance and be ready to receive the ball from the defense and run or pass the ball.

DEFENSE

  • POINT
    The point&#;s responsibility is to mark first home. She should be able to stick check and look to intercept passes.
  • COVERPOINT
    The coverpoint&#;s responsibility is to mark second home. She should be able to receive clears, run fast and have good footwork.
  • THIRD MAN
    The third man&#;s responsibility is to mark third home. She should be able to intercept passes, clear the ball, run fast and have good footwork.
  • CENTER
    The center&#;s responsibility is to control the draw and play both defense and attack. She should have speed and endurance.
  • DEFENSE WING
    The wings are responsible for marking the attack wings and bringing the ball into the attack area. Wings should have speed and endurance.
  • GOALKEEPER
    The goalkeeper&#;s responsibility is to protect the goal. She should have good stickwork, courage and confidence.

Girls&#; lacrosse is a non-contact game played by 12 players: a goalkeeper, five attackers and six defenders. Seven field players may cross the restraining line and four stay behind. The object of the game is to shoot the ball into the opponent&#;s goal. The team scoring the most goals wins.

Girls&#; and women&#;s lacrosse begins with a draw, which is taken by the center position. The ball is placed between two horizontally held crosses (sticks), placed back-to-back, at the center of the field. At the sound of the whistle, the ball is flung into the air as the crosses are pulled up and away. The sticks must come up over the players&#; head. A draw is used to start each half and after each goal, and it takes place at the center of the field. Only five players from each team are permitted between restraining lines at the time of the draw. Once the signal for the draw occurs, the players behind each restraining line may cross over.

The collegiate game is 60 minutes long, with each half being 30 minutes. The high school girls game is 50 minutes long, with each half being 25 minutes. In both collegiate and high school play, teams are allowed two timeouts per game, only after a goal. The restraining line, a solid line 30 yards up field from each goal, extends across the width of the field. Solid/hard boundaries were added to the game in Total length can be from to yards, while total width can be from 60 to 70 yards. There must always be at least 10 yards of space between the goal line and the end line at each end of the field. There is a circle in the center of the field where the draw occurs. Two arcs are marked from the center of the goal line. The eightmeter arc with hash marks four meters away from each other bisect the arc. The meter fan runs out from the goal line extended. Substitution area, used by both teams, is in front of the scorer&#;s table and is indicated by two hash marks placed 5 yards on either side of the midfield line.

Seven attacking players only are allowed over the restraining line in their offensive end and only eight defenders are allowed over the line in their defensive end. The additional defender is the goalkeeper. Players may exchange places during play, but the player should have both feet over the line before the teammate enters.

When a whistle blows, all players must stop in place. Rough checks, and contact to the body with the crosse or body, are not allowed, however, incidental body contact may occur.

Field players may pass, catch or run with the ball in their crosse. A player may gain possession of the ball by dislodging it from an opponent&#;s crosse with a check. A controlled check (crosse to crosse contact) is an attempt to knock the ball free. No player may reach across an opponent&#;s body to check the handle of a crosse when she is even with or behind that opponent. A player may not protect the ball in her crosse by cradling so close to her body or face so as to make a legal, safe check impossible for the opponent.

All legal checks must be directed away from the player with the ball and cannot come withina 7&#; sphere of the head. No player is allowed to touch the ball with her hands except the goalkeeper when she is within the goal circle. A change of possession may occur if a player gains a distinct advantage by playing the ball off her body.

Fouls are categorized as major or minor, and the penalty for fouls is a &#;free position.&#; For major fouls, the offending player is placed four meters behind the player taking the free position. For a minor foul, the offending player is placed four meters off, in the direction from which she approached her opponent before committing the foul, and play is resumed.

When a minor foul is committed in the meter fan, the player with the ball has an indirect free position, in which case the player must pass first or be checked by an opponent before the team may shoot.

A slow whistle occurs when the offense has entered the critical scoring area and is on a scoring play and the defense has committed a major foul. A flag is displayed in the air but no whistle is sounded so that the offense has an opportunity to score a goal. If the offense is capable of getting a shot off, the flag is withdrawn. A whistle is blown when a goal is scored or the scoring opportunity is over. An immediate whistle is blown when a major foul, obstruction or shooting space occurs, which jeopardizes the safety of a player.

The Youth Council of US Lacrosse has adopted rules for girls youth play.

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Girl's lacrosse is a non-contact game played by 12 players: six attackers, five defenders and a goalkeeper. First through fourth graders play with 8 players on a shortened field.  The object of the game is to shoot the ball into the opponent's goal. The team scoring the most goals wins.


Below are the modified names and positions for players on a full field. As the game evolves, so do these names. Every coach has a different style and may call these positions different names. A field diagram can be found in the Documents tab of this site.

Attack

Right and left attack players are considered playmakers and also have the responsibility of transitioning the ball from the defense to the attack.  They should be good feeders and able to shoot well from every angle and distance from the goal.

Goal circle attack player is responsible for scoring.  She plays closest to the goal and must continually cut toward the goal for a shot or away from the goal to make room for another player.  She should have excellent stickwork and must play well while closely guarded.

Right and left attack wings are responsible for transitioning the ball from defense to attack.  Wings should have speed and endurance and should be ready to receive the ball from the defense to run or pass the ball.

Center is responsible for controlling the draw and playing both defense and attack.  She should have speed and endurance.

Defense

Right and left defense are responsible for guarding the area closest to the goal.  They should be able to stick check and look to intercept passes.  They should be excellent at getting into good defensive position.

Deep defense is responsible for defending players coming over the restraining line towards the goal.  She should be able to intercept passes, clear the ball, run fast, and have good footwork. 

Right and left defense wings are responsible for marking the attack wings and bringing the ball into the attack area.  Wings should have speed and endurance.

Goalkeeper is responsible for protecting the goal.  She should have good stickwork, courage, and confidence.

 


The following is a list of terms you may frequently hear while watching a lacrosse game. Some you may be familiar with others may sound a little odd at first. But all are part of knowing the game of lacrosse.

 

  • Cradle: The act of moving the stick from side to side causing the ball to remain in the upper part of the pocket webbing.
  • Checking: The act of using a controlled tap with a crosse on an opponent's crosse in an attempt to dislodge the ball.
  • Catching: The act of receiving a passed ball with the crosse.
  • Cutting: A movement by a player without the ball in anticipation of a pass.
  • Dodging: The act of suddenly shifting direction in order to avoid an opponent.
  • Passing: The act of throwing the ball to a teammate with the crosse.
  • Pick-Ups: The act of scooping a loose ball with a crosse.
  • Shooting: The act of throwing the ball at the goal with the crosse in an attempt to score.
  • Clear: Any action taken by a player within the goal circle to pass or carry the ball out of the goal circle.
  • Critical Scoring Area (CSA): An area 15 meters in front of and to each side of the goal and nine meters behind the goal. An eight-meter arc and 12 meter fan are marked in the area.
  • Crosse (Stick): The equipment used to throw, catch, check and carry the ball.
  • Checking: Stick to stick contact consisting of a series of controlled taps in an attempt to dislodge the ball from the crosse.
  • Deputy: A player who enters the goal circle when the goalie is out of the goal circle and her team is in possession of the ball.
  • Draw: A technique to start or resume play by which a ball is placed in between the sticks of two standing players and drawn up and away.
  • Eight-Meter Arc: A semi-circular area in front of the goal used for the administration of major fouls. A defender may not remain in this area for more than three seconds unless she is within a stick's length of her opponent.
  • Free Position: An opportunity awarded to the offense when a major or minor foul is committed by the defense. All players must move four meters away from the player with the ball. When the whistle sounds to resume play, the player may run, pass or shoot the ball.
  • Free Space To Goal: A cone-shaped path extending from each side of the goal circle to the attack player with the ball. A defense player may not, for safety reasons, stand alone in this area without closely marking an opponent.
  • Goal Circle: The circle around the goal with a radius of meters ( feet). No player's stick or body may “break” the cylinder of the goal circle.
  • Grounded: Refers to any part of the goalkeeper's or deputy's body touching the ground for support outside of the goal circle when she attempts to play the ball from inside the goal circle.
  • Indirect Free Position: An opportunity awarded to the offense when a minor foul is committed by the defense inside the 12 meter fan. When the whistle sounds to resume play, the player may run or pass, but may not shoot until a defender or one of her teammates has played the ball.
  • Marking: Being within a stick's length of an opponent.
  • Penalty Lane: The path to the goal that is cleared when a free position is awarded to the attacking team.
  • Scoring Play: A continuous effort by the attacking team to move the ball toward the goal and to complete a shot on goal.
  • Stand: All players, except the goalkeeper in her goal circle, must remain stationary following the sound of any whistle.
  • Sphere: An imaginary area, approximately 18 cm (seven inches) which surrounds a player's head. No stick checks toward the head are allowed to break the sphere.
  • 12 Meter Fan: A semi-circle in front of the goal used for the administration of minor fouls.
  • Warning Cards: A yellow card presented by an umpire to a player is a warning which requires that she sit out of the game for three minutes without a substitute.  A second warning card to the same player automatically becomes a red card and she is prohibited from playing the remainder of the game.  If an umpire issues a red card to a player, the player is suspended from further participation in the current and next game.   A green card is presented by an umpire to the team captain indicating a team caution for delay of game.  See casinoextra.fr for other details pertaining to cards.
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Attack
The position of attack requires the most stick skill of all positions, with the exception of the goalie. Attackmen should demonstrate good stick work with either hand and have quick feet to maneuver around the goal in heavy traffic. Effective attackmen have good peripheral vision, precision passes, and can effectively dodge, screen and shoot. The attack are always on the field as a scoring threat and, given an even match up, should score often. Typically the attack work behind the net, called the "X" area, and on the flanks of the crease, called the "wings". This gives the attackmen the most room to dodge and cut. Attackmen generally restrict their play to half of the field. They must work with the midfield to run an effective offense. An attackman should be quick, alert, confident in one-on-one situations and be able to withstand physical punishment by the opposing defensemen.

Some Rules:

The attack use dodging, picks (just like in basketball), and passing to generate a good shot. Similar to basketball, the object is to move the ball around until the defense breaks and someone is left with an open shot. One way to do this is by letting an attackman go one-on-one with a defender. The attackman tries to beat his defender by dodging, causing another defenseman to slide, creating an unbalanced situation in which he can either shoot or pass to someone else who is wide open. The attackman can move in any direction with any amount of force, as there are no charging rules. The attackman, however, like all players cannot clamp the ball in his stick with his thumb, chest, or helmet. He is also not allowed to push or hit the defenseman's stick with his arms or hands. This is called warding.

The Midfielder

The midfielder is considered by many to be the backbone of the lacrosse team. Good midfielders need speed, stamina, hustle and determination. They are required to play both defense and offense. However, the middies are largely responsible for a key aspect of the game - transition. Transition is by far the most important part of the game and helped create the nickname, 'The Fastest Game on Two Feet'. It involves retrieving loose balls, or clearing saved shots and running and passing the ball up the length of the field. If a team can get the ball and have an extra man advantage on the offensive end of the field, even for a split second, they have a good opportunity to score. When this advantage occurs in transition it is called a fast break. A midfielder should be able to shift quickly from offense to defense. Midfielders do not have to be proficient scorers, but should be able to "read" what is about to happen next.

Some Rules:

Along the center of the field is the midfield line. It is this reference point that determines whether a team is offsides or not. The rules for offsides are simple: you must have 4 players on your defensive end at all times, and 3 players on your offensive end at all times. Since it doesn't matter which players stay on what side, it is up to the midfield to keep their team onsides, by staying on one side or the other. Since the position requires so much running, the midfielders often changes lines on the fly, as in hockey.

DEFENSE

The defenseman′s responsibility is to defend the goal. Although size aids the defenseman, more importantly defensemen should be quick, agile and aggressive. Speed is always a valuable commodity, but the ability to act and react, to judiciously apply pressure and to recover are the key ingredients to an effective defenseman. They must keep the attack at bay. Their job is to keep the ball away from the net so the opposing attack doesn't get a good look at the goal. The job is difficult: A defenseman doesn't know where the attack are going or what they are going to do. In his arsenal the defenseman has a long stick (12U and above). This stick allows a defender to keep the attackmen at a distance, thus allowing him to throw checks without being beaten on foot. Good footwork is an extremely important part of playing good defense.  A defenseman must be able to apply pressure and be aggressive, without lunging a foot and body forward is key, otherwise the offensive player can then easily go around the overly aggressive defenseman. A defenseman must be able to think and react quickly, and most importantly communicate with his fellow defensemen.

Some Rules 

Defensemen are allowed to check the attackmen they are covering. What this means is a defenseman is allowed to use his stick to hit the attackman's stick and arms. A defenseman cannot strike the attackman on the head, and cannot strike the attackman's body with the stick with any significant force. This penalty is called a slash. Most slash penalties occur when a defenseman employs the use of a 'slap' check, which is when the stick is swung perpendicular to the attackman's shaft in a slapping motion. The other common check is the 'poke' check, in which the defenseman simply jabs straight on at an attackman's stick in a motion like that of a pool cue. When the attackman is close enough, a defenseman can use his body for defense. Body checking, or hitting, in lacrosse is very similar to that in hockey. A legal body check is any hit that is head to head (no hitting from behind). People who are legal targets are anyone standing within five yards of a loose ball, or anyone with possession of the ball. Hitting someone without the ball, while another player has possession is called interference.

The Goalie:

The position of goalie in lacrosse is probably one of the most intense positions of all sports. Essentially, you must play catch with people at a very high speed. Unfortunately for the goalie, most people don't throw at his stick. The goalie wears additional protective equipment: throat guard and chest protector. A goalie stick is typically of normal length, inches, with an extra wide head. Unlike goalies in hockey, lacrosse goalies must be very mobile. They often come out of the circular crease that surrounds the 6′x6′ goal. Explosive speed and very quick hands are key ingredients in making a goalie, as well as a tolerance for pain. When a goalie comes out of the crease to fetch ground balls or to clear a saved shot, he becomes a target, much like the quarterback in football  A good goalie leads the defense by reading the situation and directing the defensemen to react. A goalie also directs the clearing patterns and provides intangible cohesion that binds a team together. A good goalie should have excellent hand/eye coordination and a strong voice. Quickness, agility, confidence, a "thick skin" by not getting too down when scored on and the ability to concentrate are also essential.

Some Rules:

The goalie defends a square goal six feet wide by six feet high. Around the goal is a circular crease. The crease area is limited to entry by the goalie and defensive players only. Once the goalie makes a save he has 4 seconds to either pass the ball or run the ball out of the crease. In these four seconds no one may touch him. Once the goalie steps outside the crease he is no longer allowed back into the crease unless he yields possession of the ball.

 

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Girls Lacrosse - An Overview

Girls lacrosse is a non-contact game played by 12 players: a goalkeeper, four defenders, four attackers, and three midfielders. Seven field players may cross the restraining line into the defense or attack ends of the field and four stay behind, not including the goalkeeper. The object of the game is to shoot the ball into the opponent's goal. The team scoring the most goals wins.

Girls and womens lacrosse begins with a draw, which is taken by the center position. The ball is placed between two horizontally held crosses (sticks), placed back-to-back, at the center of the field. At the sound of the whistle, the ball is flung into the air as the crosses are pulled up and away. The sticks must come up over the players' head. A draw is used to start each half and after each goal, and it takes place at the center of the field. Only five players from each team are permitted between restraining lines at the time of the draw. Once the signal for the draw occurs, the players behind each restraining line may cross over.

The collegiate game is 60 minutes long, with each half being 30 minutes. The high school girls game is 50 minutes long, with each half being 25 minutes. In both collegiate and high school play, teams are allowed two timeouts per game, only after a goal. The restraining line, a solid line 30 yards up field from each goal, extends across the width of the field. Solid/hard boundaries were added to the game in Total length can be from to yards, while total width can be from 60 to 70 yards. There must always be at least 10 yards of space between the goal line and the end line at each end of the field. There is a circle in the center of the field where the draw occurs. Two arcs are marked from the center of the goal line. The 8-meter arc with hash marks four meters away from each other bisect the arc. The meter fan runs out from the goal line extended. Substitution area, used by both teams, is in front of the scorer's table and is indicated by two hash marks placed 5 yards on either side of the midfield line.

Seven attacking players only are allowed over the restraining line in their offensive end and only eight defenders are allowed over the line in their defensive end. The additional defender is the goalkeeper. Players may exchange places during play, but the player should have both feet over the line before the teammate enters.

Field players may pass, catch or run with the ball in their crosse. A player may gain possession of the ball by dislodging it from an opponent's crosse with a check. A controlled check (crosse to crosse contact) is an attempt to knock the ball free. No player may reach across an opponent's body to check the handle of a crosse when she is even with or behind that opponent. A player may not protect the ball in her crosse by cradling so close to her body or face so as to make a legal, safe check impossible for the opponent.

When a whistle blows, all players must stop in place. Rough checks, and contact to the body with the crosse or body, are not allowed, however, incidental body contact may occur. All legal checks must be directed away from the player with the ball and cannot come within a 7" sphere of the head. No player is allowed to touch the ball with her hands except the goalkeeper when she is within the goal circle. A change of possession may occur if a player gains a distinct advantage by playing the ball off her body.

Fouls are categorized as major or minor, and the penalty for fouls is a "free position." For major fouls, the offending player is placed four meters behind the player taking the free position. For a minor foul, the offending player is placed four meters off, in the direction from which she approached her opponent before committing the foul, and play is resumed.

When a minor foul is committed in the meter fan, the player with the ball has an indirect free position, in which case the player must pass first or be checked by an opponent before the team may shoot.

A slow whistle occurs when the offense has entered the critical scoring area and is on a scoring play and the defense has committed a major foul. A flag is displayed in the air but no whistle is sounded so that the offense has an opportunity to score a goal. If the offense is capable of getting a shot off, the flag is withdrawn. A whistle is blown when a goal is scored or the scoring opportunity is over. An immediate whistle is blown when a major foul, obstruction or shooting space occurs, which jeopardizes the safety of a player.

The Youth Council of US Lacrosse has adopted rules for girls youth play. To get a complete copy of the rules for girls' lacrosse, please visit the US Lacrosse online store.

 

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FIELD POSITIONS

 

MIDFIELD:

Center: The center's responsibility is to control the draw and play both defense and attack. She should have speed and endurance.

Midfielders: The midfielders (middies) are responsible for transitioning the ball from defense to attack and for slowing the opposing team’s transition. Middies should have speed and endurance and be ready to receive the ball from the defense and run or pass the ball.

 

ATTACK:

First Home: The first home's responsibility is to score. Located in front of the goal, the first home must continually cut toward the goal for a shot, or cut away from the goal to make room for another player. She should have excellent stick work.

Second Home: The second home is considered the playmaker. She should be able to shoot well from every angle and distance from the goal.

Third Home: The third home's responsibility is to transition the ball from defense to attack. She should be able to feed the ball to other players and fill in wing areas.

Attack Wing: The attack wing is responsible for bringing the ball into the attack area. She plays like a middie but cannot play on the defensive end. She helps the middies transition the ball from defense to attack. Wings should have speed and endurance and be ready to receive the ball from the defense and run or pass to the attack. They may also be involved in the first line of defense.

 

THE DEFENSE:

Goalkeeper: The goalkeeper's leads the defense. Her primary responsibility is to protect the goal. She also directs the other defensive players and communicates the opponent’s movements to her team. She should have good stick work, courage, and confidence.

Point: The point's responsibility is to mark first home. She should be able to stick check and look to intercept passes.

Coverpoint: The coverpoint's responsibility is to mark second home. She should be able to receive clears, run fast and have good footwork.

Third Man: The third man's responsibility is to mark third home. She should be able to intercept passes, clear the ball, run fast and have good footwork.

Defense Wing: The defense wing is responsible for marking the attack wings. She plays like a middie but cannot play on the attack end. She helps the middies slow the opponent’s transition from defense to attack. Wings should have speed and endurance and be ready to be the first line of defense. They may also be involved in the transition to attack.

 

Glossary of Terms in the Game

Box:
An area between the two team benches used to hold players who have been served with penalties, and through which substitutions "on the fly" are permitted directly from the sideline onto the field.

Check-Up:
A call given by the goalie to tell each defender to find his mark and call out her number.

Clearing or Transition:
Running or passing the ball from the defensive half of the field to the offensive half of the field.

Crease:
A circle around the goal into which only defensive players (usually just the goalie) may enter. Defensive players may not take the ball into the crease.

Crosse (stick):
The equipment used to throw, catch and carry the ball.

Draw:
A technique used to put the ball in play at the start of each half, or after a goal is scored. The players stand together in the middle of the field and the ball is placed between their crosses. On the whistle, the ball must be thrown above the heads of the players.

Fast-Break:
A transition scoring opportunity in which the offense has at least a one-player advantage.

Ground Ball:
A loose ball on the playing field.

Handle (shaft):
An aluminum, wooden or composite pole connected to the head of the crosse.

Head:
The plastic or wood part of the stick connected to the handle used to catch, throw and shoot.

Restraining Line:
The lines which define the field of play into three sections.

On-The-Fly Substitution:
A substitution made during play.

Pick:
An offensive maneuver in which a stationary player attempts to block the path of a defender guarding another offensive player.

Slow Whistle:
If a player commits a foul and an offended player may be disadvantaged by the immediate suspension of play, the official shall display a yellow flag in her hand and withhold the whistle until such time as the situation of advantage, gained or lost, has been completed.

Pocket:
The strung part of the head of the stick which holds the ball.

Riding:
The act of trying to prevent a team from clearing the ball from their defensive end to their offensive end of the field.

Release:
The term used by an official to notify a penalized player in the box that she may re-enter the game occurs at the conclusion at a time-serving penalty.

Unsettled Situation:
Any situation in which the defense is not positioned correctly, usually due to a loose ball or broken clear.

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Women's Lacrosse Field Diagram and Positions

1- History & Object
2- The Essentials (Offense & Defense, Scoring, Etc.)
3- Field Diagram and Positions
4- Fouls
5- Glossary of Lacrosse Terms

Field of Play

Women&#;s lacrosse field dimensions vary, and natural boundaries or visible guidelines are used to determine the perimeter of the playing area. Common characteristics include:

Restraining line: Divides area where a maximum of seven offensive players and eight defensive players (including the goalkeeper) are allowed; otherwise, a team foul is called.

Goal: Points are scored when the ball passes through this six-foot by six-foot square.

Critical scoring area: Unmarked area 15 meters in front and to the side of the goal, and 9 meters behind it. Includes the &#;fan&#; and the &#;arc.&#; Defenders must allow free space to goalwhen the offense is inside this area. Also, penalties within this area have special consequences.

Twelve-meter fan: meter semi-circle used in the administration of minor fouls. Also called the &#;fan.&#;

Eight-meter arc: Line inside which defenders must be within a stick's-length of their attackers. Used to administer a free shot. Also called the &#;arc.&#;

Hash marks: Five marks on the eight-meter arc used for a free shot. Play resumes from the closest hash mark to the foul.

Goal circle: Circle that surrounds the goal and indicates the area in which only the goalie can enter. Also called the &#;crease.&#;

Center circle: Circle in the middle of the field where a drawis held.

Team substitution area: Area where substitute players may enter the field on-the-fly.

Positions

Two teams compete with 12 players each: a goalkeeper, 5 attackers, and 6 defenders (can also be categorized as goalkeeper, 3 attackers, 5 midfielders, and 3 defenders).

Attackers

Attackers include the first home, second home, third home, and two attack wings. The first home first homeis highly skilled with the stick and is relied upon to score. The second home second hoem is a versatile playmaker who must get open to set up scoring opportunities. She possesses a great shot and knack for finding an open teammate. The third home third home is an all-around player who is a key to transition from defense to offense. She must be able to quickly change from an offensive mindset to marking. The attack wings attack wings are often involved in finishing a fast break. These speedsters need to be strong passers and shooters. They are often first to gain possession off a draw.

Defenders

Defenders include the point, coverpoint, third man, center, defense wings, and goalkeeper. The point pointmarks the first home. Decision-making, positioning, and shot blocking are key skills. The coverpoint cover point is usually the best one-on-one defender who relies on speed and footwork to mark the second home. The third man third man is a multi-dimensional athlete whose primary duty is disturbing the attack in the midfield. On defense she looks to intercept passes and quickly pick up an open attacker. Also has occasional scoring opportunities. The center is a pivotal player in transition from defense to offense. She also controls the draw. The defense wings defense wingsneed to match the speed and endurance of the attack wings and possess a good outside shot. The goalkeeper goalkeeperattempts to save each shot with her stick, but can also use any body part to keep the ball out of the goal. Lightning-fast reflexes, quick decisions, and courage are required to stop a barrage of high-velocity shots.

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What Are The Lines On A Lacrosse Field?

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Welcome to the sport of lacrosse. We'll start by learning about the basics of the field. Below is a picture of the lacrosse field.

The surface of an outdoor lacrosse field is made of grass or artificial turf. Indoor lacrosse is played on artificial turf. Cones or pylons are placed at each corner of the field and at the midfield line just outside of the sideline.

Every lacrosse field has four main lines:

  1. End line
  2. Sideline
  3. Midfield line
  4. Restraining line

Boundary Lines

Lacrosse Boundary Lines

The boundary lines of the lacrosse field are made up of the end lines and sidelines and determine when a player is in-bounds and out-of-bounds. When the ball crosses over the end line or sideline or a player touches the line with their feet, the official will blow the whistle signal that play is out-of-bounds. When the game was originally invented and long into the modern era, lacrosse was played with "soft" boundary lines.

The Crease

Lacrosse Crease

In addition, lacrosse fields also have a goal crease for each team that is used to dictate scoring rules in the game. The goal apparatus is situated inside the crease, which is delineated by a circle that is nine feet across. The goaltender protects the goal inside the crease, and attacking players are not allowed inside the crease area with the exception of a scoring chance known as a dive. Players are allowed to move and pass the ball behind the crease.

Locations

There are a few locations of interest on a lacrosse field you should know called the hole, the x, the box, and the GLE. These spots on the field are used during various rules and aspects of the game. They are also great shooting and passing locations that are optimal for any offense.

Play begins in the center of the field on the midfield line inside the face-off or draw circle. Teams start on opposite sides of the field, and a certain number of players from each team must remain behind the restraining line in their respective offensive or defensive end.

Player Positions

Lacrosse Player Positions

The lacrosse field is divided into three main areas - the attack area or critical scoring area, the midfield and the defensive area. In men's field lacrosse, three attackmen play in the attack area, three midfielders play in the midfield area and three defensemen play in the defensive area. Midfielders will transition throughout all three sections of the field. In women's lacrosse, four attackers play in the attack area, three midfielders play in the midfield area and three defenders play in the defensive area. The goaltenders remain in the defensive area close to the crease.

Lacrosse Substitution area

The out-of-bounds area on one side of the field includes several important areas. The penalty box and substitution box see lots of activity throughout the game, with players running through the substitution box to exchange with a teammate or serving time in the penalty box for a rules violation. Coaches and members of the team who are not on the starting roster stand on opposite sides of the midfield line extended. The timekeeper, scorekeeper and other game volunteers sit at a table at the midfield line extended behind the substitution area and penalty box.

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Men's Lacrosse Field


Men's Lacrosse Positions 

There are 4 main positions in mens lacrosse.  The positions are: goalie (1), defenseman (3), midfield (3), and  attackmen (3).  10 players per team can be on the field at once.

Goalkeeper: The goalkeeper's main responsibility is to prevent the other team from scoring.  They are the last line of defense.  A goalie leads the defense by calling out ball location, cutters, and points the defense in the right direction to react.  Quickness, courage, confidence, being vocal are key ingredients for a successful goalkeeper.  There is one goalie for each team on the field. 

Defense: The defensemen's responsibility is to protect the area around the goal.  The defense usually plays on their defensive side of the field (endline to midfield line) the magority of the game.  Agressiveness, quickness, and excellent footwork are important qualities for a defensman.  Each team has three defensemen on the field.

Midfield: Midfielders are responsible to cover the entire field.  They are considered the most versatile of all the positions.  A midfielder should have an adequate balance between having good stick skills and playing solid individual defense.  Endurance and speed are important qualities for a midfielder.  A midfielder in soccer would be an accurate comparison.      

Attack: An attackmen's responsibility is to score goals.  Attackmen play on their offensive side of the field (midfield line to endline) the magority of the game.  Attackmen generally have the best stick skills out of all the positions, can use both hands proficiently and are usually very agile.  These qualities help them protect their stick from a defender who uses a stick that is twice as long.           


Women's Lacrosse Field


Women's Lacrosse Positions

THE ATTACK:

First Home: The first home's responsibility is to score.  Located in front of the goal, the first home continually cuts toward the goal for a shot, or cuts away from the goal to make room for another player. She should have excellent stickwork.
Second Home: The second home is considered the playmaker, similar to a point guard in basketball.  She should be able to shoot well from every angle and distance from the goal.
Third Home: The third home's responsibility is to transition the ball from defense to attack. She should be able to feed the ball to other players and fill in wing areas.
Attack Wings: The wings are also responsible for transitioning the ball from defense to attack. Wings should have speed and endurance and be ready to receive the ball from the defense and run or pass the ball.

THE DEFENSE:

Point: The point's responsibility is to mark the first home on the opposing team. She should be able to stick check, body check and look to intercept passes.
Coverpoint: The coverpoint's responsibility is to mark second home. She should be able to receive clears, run fast and have good footwork.
Third Man: The third man's responsibility is to mark the third home on the opposing team. She should be able to intercept passes, clear the ball, run fast and have good footwork.
Center: The center's responsibility is to control the draw and play both defense and attack, lacrosse field positions diagram. The draw is similar to a face off in hockey or a tip off in basketball.  She should have speed and endurance.
Defense Wings: The wings are responsible for marking the attack wings and bringing the ball into the attack area. Wings should have speed and endurance.
Goalkeeper:  The goalkeeper's main responsibility is to prevent the other team from scoring.  A goalie leads the defense by calling out ball location, cutters, and points the defense in the right direction to react.  Quickness, courage, confidence, and being vocal are key ingredients for a successful goalkeeper.  There is one goalie for each team on the field. 


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Girls Lacrosse - An Overview

Girls lacrosse is a non-contact game played by 12 players: a goalkeeper, four defenders, four attackers, and three midfielders. Seven field players may cross the restraining line into the defense or attack ends of the field and four stay behind, not including the goalkeeper. The object of the game is to shoot the ball into the opponent's goal. The team scoring the most goals wins.

Girls and womens lacrosse begins with a lacrosse field positions diagram, which is taken by the center position, lacrosse field positions diagram. The ball is placed between two horizontally held crosses (sticks), lacrosse field positions diagram, placed back-to-back, at the center of the field. At the sound of the whistle, the ball is flung into the air as the crosses are pulled up and away. The sticks lacrosse field positions diagram come up over the players' head. A draw is used to start each half and after each goal, and it takes place at the center of the field. Only five players from each team are permitted between restraining lines at the time of the draw. Once the signal for the draw occurs, the players behind each restraining line may cross over.

The collegiate game is 60 minutes long, with each half being 30 minutes. The high school girls game is 50 minutes long, with each half being 25 minutes. In both collegiate and high school play, teams are allowed two timeouts per game, only after a goal. The restraining line, lacrosse field positions diagram, a solid line 30 yards lacrosse field positions diagram field from each goal, extends across the width of the field. Solid/hard boundaries were added to the game in Total length can be from to yards, while total width can be from 60 to 70 yards. There lacrosse field positions diagram always be at least 10 yards of space between the goal line and the end line at each end of nissan 370z lug nuts field. There is a circle in the center of the field where the draw occurs. Two arcs are marked from the center of the goal line. The 8-meter arc with hash marks four meters away from each other bisect the arc. The meter fan runs out from the goal line extended. Substitution area, used by both teams, is in front of the scorer's table and is indicated by two hash marks placed 5 yards on either side of the midfield line.

Seven attacking players only are allowed over the restraining line in their offensive end and only eight defenders are allowed over the line in their defensive end. The additional defender is the goalkeeper. Players may exchange places during play, but the player should have both feet over the line before the teammate enters.

Field players may pass, catch or run with the ball in their crosse. Lacrosse field positions diagram player may gain possession of the ball by dislodging it from an opponent's crosse lacrosse field positions diagram a check. A controlled check (crosse to crosse contact) is an attempt to knock the ball free. No player may reach across an opponent's body to check the handle of a crosse when she is even with or behind that opponent. A player may not protect the ball in her crosse by cradling so close to her body or face so as to make a legal, safe check impossible for the opponent.

When a whistle blows, all players must stop in place. Rough checks, and contact to the body with the crosse or body, are not allowed, however, incidental body contact may occur. All legal checks must be directed away from the player with the ball and cannot come within a 7" sphere of the head. No player is allowed to touch the ball with her hands except the goalkeeper when she is within the goal circle. A change of possession may occur if a player gains a distinct advantage by playing the ball off her body.

Fouls are categorized as major or minor, and the penalty for fouls is a "free position." For major fouls, the offending player is placed four meters behind the player taking the free position. For a minor foul, lacrosse field positions diagram, the offending player is placed four meters off, in the direction from which she approached her opponent before committing the foul, and play is resumed.

When a minor foul is committed in the meter fan, the player with the ball has an indirect free position, in which case the player must pass first or be checked by an opponent before the team may shoot.

A slow whistle occurs when the offense has entered the critical scoring area and is on a scoring play and the defense has committed a major foul. A flag is displayed in the air but no whistle is sounded so that the offense has an opportunity to score a goal. If the offense is capable of getting a shot off, the flag is withdrawn. A whistle is blown when a goal is scored or the scoring opportunity is over. An immediate whistle is blown when a major foul, obstruction or shooting space occurs, which jeopardizes the safety of a player.

The Youth Council of US Lacrosse has adopted rules for girls youth play. To get a complete copy of the rules for girls' lacrosse, please visit the US Lacrosse online store.

 

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FIELD POSITIONS

 

MIDFIELD:

Center: The center's responsibility is to control the draw and play both defense and attack. She should have speed and endurance.

Midfielders: The midfielders (middies) are responsible for transitioning the ball from defense to attack and for slowing the opposing team’s transition. Middies should have speed and endurance and be ready to receive the ball from the defense and run or pass the ball.

 

ATTACK:

First Home: The first home's responsibility is to score. Located in front of the goal, the first home must continually cut toward the goal for a shot, or cut away from the goal to make room for another player. She should have excellent stick work.

Second Home: The second home is considered the playmaker. She should be able to shoot well from every angle and distance from the goal.

Third Home: The third home's responsibility is to transition the ball from defense to attack. She should be able to feed the ball to other players and fill in wing areas.

Attack Wing: The attack wing is responsible for bringing the ball into the attack area. She plays like a middie but cannot play on the defensive end. She helps the middies transition the ball from defense lacrosse field positions diagram attack. Wings should have speed and endurance and be ready to receive the ball from the defense and run or pass to the attack. They may also be involved in the first line of lacrosse field positions diagram DEFENSE:

Goalkeeper: The goalkeeper's leads the defense. Her primary responsibility is to protect the goal. She also directs the other defensive players and communicates the opponent’s movements to her team. She should have good stick work, courage, and confidence.

Point: The point's responsibility is to mark first home. She should be able to stick check and look to intercept passes.

Coverpoint: The coverpoint's responsibility is to mark second home. She should be able to receive clears, run fast and have good footwork.

Third Man: The third man's responsibility is to mark third home. She should be able to intercept passes, clear the ball, run fast and have good footwork.

Defense Wing: The defense wing is responsible for marking the attack wings. She plays like a middie but cannot play on the attack end. She helps the middies slow the opponent’s transition from defense to attack, lacrosse field positions diagram. Wings should have speed and endurance and be ready to be the first line of defense. They may also be involved in the transition to attack.

 

Glossary of Terms in the Game

Box:
An area between the two team benches used to hold players who have been served with penalties, and through which substitutions "on the fly" are permitted directly from the sideline onto the field.

Check-Up:
A call given by the goalie to tell each defender to find his mark and call out her number.

Clearing or Transition:
Running or passing the ball from the defensive half of the field to the offensive half of the field.

Crease:
A circle around the goal into which only defensive players (usually just the goalie) may enter. Defensive players may not take the ball into the crease.

Crosse (stick):
The equipment used to throw, catch and carry the ball.

Draw:
A technique used to put the ball in play at the start of each half, or after a goal is scored. The players stand together in the middle of the field and the ball is placed between their crosses. On the whistle, the ball must be thrown above the heads of the players.

Fast-Break:
A transition scoring opportunity in which the offense has at least a one-player advantage.

Ground Ball:
A loose ball on the playing field.

Handle (shaft):
An aluminum, wooden or composite pole connected to the head of the crosse.

Head:
The plastic or wood part of the stick connected to the handle used to catch, throw and shoot.

Restraining Line:
The lines which define the field of play into three sections.

On-The-Fly Substitution:
A substitution made during play.

Pick:
An offensive maneuver in which a stationary player attempts to block the path of a defender guarding another offensive player.

Slow Whistle:
If a player commits a foul and an offended player may be disadvantaged by the immediate suspension of play, the official shall display a yellow flag in her hand and withhold the whistle until such time as the situation of advantage, gained or lost, has been completed.

Pocket:
The strung part of the head of the stick which holds the ball.

Riding:
The act of trying to prevent a team from clearing the ball from their defensive end to their offensive end of the field.

Release:
The term used by an official to notify a penalized player in the box that she may re-enter the game occurs at the conclusion at a time-serving penalty.

Unsettled Situation:
Any situation in which the defense is not positioned correctly, usually due to a loose ball or broken clear.

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Field of Play

lacrosse field diagram

Lacrosse is played on a large rectangular grass field. The field has markings with specific functions:

Midfield line: Divides the field into equal halves. The X centered on this line is where face-offs take place. Also, the proper number of players on each team must remain on each half of the field to avoid being called for offsides.

Sidelines and endlines: Mark the boundaries. When a ball or player goes out of bounds, the opposing team takes possession. Following a shot, the player closest to spot where the ball went out of bounds has possession. Therefore, a teammate should always be in a position to back up a shot.

Goal: Points are scored when the ball passes through this six-foot by six-foot square.

Crease: Circle surrounding the goal that the offense cannot enter. Players can reach into the crease with their stick to gain possession of a loose ball, but cannot touch the goalie. Crease violations result in a penalty.

Attack area/defense clearing area: The offense has 10 seconds to move into this area after crossing the midfield line. Once the defense has possession of the ball, it has 10 seconds to advance out of this area. Also, attackers and defenders must remain in these areas during the face-off.

Penalty box: Used as a holding area for players to wait out their penalties. It is also the access area for substitute players entering and exiting the field for on-the-fly substitutions.

Wing area: Two of the three midfielders must remain in the wing area until the face-off starts.

Positions

Two teams compete with 10 players on the field. Players fall into four categories:

Attack: Offensive-minded players who possess great stick skills that allow them to shoot with precision and fake. They use speed and agility to elude defenders. Attackers also endure punishing hits from opponents.

Midfield: Always on the move, these players advance the ball up the field and play both offense and defense. Help defenders and tally assists by taking the ball from defensive area to attackers. They are fast, durable, and stick savvy. Also called “middies.”

Defense: Defenders use size, speed, strength, and skill to keep attackers from scoring. An aggressive mindset is beneficial, but playing under control and selecting the proper angle to prevent close range shots are more critical skills.

 Goalie: Uses lightning-fast reflexes, quick decisions, and courage to stop a barrage of high-velocity shots. Body must handle punishment from the ball, and mind has to quickly recover from mistakes. The goalie directs the defense by calling for checks and relaying locations of the ball and attackers.

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Attack
The position of attack requires the most stick skill of all positions, with the exception of the goalie. Attackmen should demonstrate good stick work with either hand and have quick feet to maneuver around the goal in heavy traffic. Effective attackmen have good peripheral vision, precision passes, and can effectively dodge, screen and shoot. The attack are always on the field as a scoring threat and, given an even match up, should score often. Typically the attack work behind the net, called the "X" area, and on the flanks of the crease, called the "wings". This gives the attackmen the most room to dodge and cut. Attackmen generally restrict their play to half of the field. They must work with the midfield to run an effective offense. An attackman should be quick, alert, confident in one-on-one situations and be able to withstand physical punishment by the opposing defensemen.

Some Rules:

The attack use dodging, picks (just like in basketball), and passing to generate a good shot. Similar to basketball, the object is to move the ball around until the defense breaks and someone is left with an open shot. One way to do this is by letting an attackman go one-on-one with a defender. The attackman tries to beat his defender by dodging, causing another defenseman to slide, creating an unbalanced situation in which he can either shoot or pass to someone else who is wide open. The attackman can move in any direction with any amount of force, as there are no charging rules. The attackman, however, like all players cannot clamp the ball in his stick with his thumb, lacrosse field positions diagram, chest, or helmet. He is also not allowed to push or hit the defenseman's stick with his arms or hands. This is called warding.

The Midfielder

The midfielder is considered by many to be the backbone of the lacrosse team. Good midfielders need speed, stamina, hustle and determination. They are required to play both defense and offense. However, the middies are largely responsible for a key aspect of the game - transition, lacrosse field positions diagram. Transition is by far the most important part of the game and helped create the nickname, 'The Fastest Game on Two Feet', lacrosse field positions diagram. It involves retrieving loose balls, or clearing saved shots and running and passing the ball up the length of the field. If a team can get the ball and have an extra man advantage on the offensive end of the field, even for a split second, they have a good opportunity to score. When this advantage occurs in transition it is called a fast break. A midfielder should be able to shift quickly from offense to defense. Midfielders do not have to be proficient scorers, but should be able to "read" what is about to happen next.

Some Rules:

Along the center of the field is the midfield line. It is this reference point that determines whether a team is offsides or not. The rules for offsides are simple: you must have 4 players on your defensive end at all times, and 3 players on your offensive end at all times, lacrosse field positions diagram. Since it doesn't matter which players stay on what side, it is up to the midfield to keep their team onsides, by staying on one side or the other. Since the position requires so much running, the midfielders often changes lines on the fly, as in hockey.

DEFENSE

The defenseman′s responsibility is to defend the lacrosse field positions diagram. Although size aids the defenseman, more importantly defensemen should be quick, agile and aggressive. Speed is always a valuable commodity, but the ability to act and react, to judiciously apply pressure and to recover are the key ingredients to an effective defenseman. They must keep the attack at bay, lacrosse field positions diagram. Their job is to keep the ball away from the net so the opposing attack doesn't get a good look at the goal. The job is difficult: A defenseman doesn't know where the attack are going or what they are going to do. In his arsenal the defenseman has a long stick (12U and above). This stick allows a defender to keep the attackmen at a distance, thus allowing him to throw checks without being beaten on foot. Good footwork is an extremely important part of playing good defense.  A defenseman must be able to apply pressure and be aggressive, without lunging a foot and body forward is key, otherwise the offensive player can then easily go around the overly aggressive defenseman. A defenseman must be able to think and react quickly, and most importantly communicate with his fellow defensemen.

Some Rules 

Defensemen are allowed to check the attackmen they are covering. What this means is a defenseman is allowed to use his stick to hit the attackman's stick and arms. A defenseman cannot strike the attackman on the head, and cannot strike the attackman's body with the stick lacrosse field positions diagram any significant force. This penalty is called a slash. Most slash penalties occur when a defenseman employs the use of a 'slap' check, which is when the stick is swung perpendicular to the attackman's shaft in a slapping motion. The other common check is the 'poke' check, lacrosse field positions diagram, in which the defenseman simply jabs straight on at an attackman's stick in a motion like that of a pool cue. When the attackman is close enough, a defenseman can use his body for defense. Body checking, or hitting, in lacrosse is very similar to that in hockey. A legal body check is any hit that is head to head (no hitting from behind). People who are legal targets are anyone standing within five yards of a loose ball, or anyone with possession of the ball. Hitting someone without the ball, lacrosse field positions diagram, while another player has possession is called interference.

The Goalie:

The position of goalie in lacrosse is probably one of the most intense positions of all sports. Essentially, you must play catch with people at a very high speed. Unfortunately for the goalie, most people don't throw at his stick. The goalie wears additional protective equipment: throat guard and chest protector. A goalie stick is typically of normal length, inches, with an extra wide head. Unlike goalies in hockey, lacrosse goalies must be very mobile, lacrosse field positions diagram. They often come out of the circular crease that surrounds the 6′x6′ goal. Explosive speed and very quick hands are key ingredients in making a goalie, as well as a tolerance for pain. When a goalie comes out of the crease to fetch ground balls or to clear a saved shot, he becomes a target, much like the quarterback in football  A good goalie leads the defense by reading the situation and directing the defensemen to react. A goalie also directs the clearing patterns and provides intangible cohesion that binds a team together. A good goalie should have excellent hand/eye coordination and a strong voice. Quickness, agility, confidence, lacrosse field positions diagram, a "thick skin" by not getting too down when scored on and the ability to concentrate are also essential.

Some Rules:

The goalie defends a square goal six feet wide by six feet high. Around the goal is a circular crease. The crease area is limited to entry by the goalie and defensive players only. Once the goalie makes a save he has 4 seconds to either pass the ball or run the ball out of the crease. In these four seconds no one may touch him. Once the goalie steps outside the crease he is no longer allowed back into the crease unless he yields possession of the ball.

 

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Box lacrosse

Indoor version of lacrosse

Box lacrosse casinoextra.fr

A box lacrosse goaltender

Highest governing&#;bodyWorld Lacrosse
NicknamesBoxla, box, indoor
First playeds in Canada
ContactCollision
Team membersFive runners and a goalie

Box lacrosse, also known as boxla, box, or indoor lacrosse, is an indoor version of lacrosse played mostly in North America. The game originated in Canada in the s, where it is more popular than field lacrosse. Lacrosse is Canada's official national summer sport. Box lacrosse is played between two teams of five players and one goalie each, and is traditionally played on an ice hockey rink once the ice has been removed or covered. The playing area is called a box, in contrast to the open playing field of field lacrosse. The object of the game is to use a lacrosse stick to catch, carry, and pass the ball in an effort to score by shooting a solid rubber lacrosse ball into the opponent's goal. The highest level of box lacrosse is the National Lacrosse League.

While there are 62 total members of World Lacrosse, only fifteen have competed in international box lacrosse competition. Only Canada, the Iroquois Nationals and the United States have finished in the top three places at the World Indoor Lacrosse Championships.

History[edit]

Lacrosse is a traditional indigenous people's game and was first encountered by Europeans when French Jesuit missionaries in the St. Lawrence Valley witnessed the game in the s.[1] Lacrosse for centuries was seen as a key element of cultural identity and spiritual healing to the people of Turtle Island. It originated as a field game and was adopted first by Canadian, American, and English athletes as a field game, eventually settling on a 10 v 10 format.

Box lacrosse is a modern version of the game that was invented in Canada during the s and s. The roots of indoor lacrosse are obscure, but its invention has been attributed to one Paddy Brennan, a field lacrosse player and referee from Montreal, who, being annoyed by the constant slowing of play from balls going out of bounds in the field game, experimented with indoor games at the Mount Royal Arena during the early s.[2]

Joseph Cattarinich and Leo Dandurand, owners of the National Hockey League's Montreal Canadiens in the s, led the participating ice hockey arena owners to introduce the new sport.[3] In the s, 6 v 6 indoor lacrosse came to be played in the summer in unused hockey rinks. Canadians adopted the new version of the sport quickly. Eventually, it became the more popular version of the sport in Canada, supplanting field lacrosse.[4] The form was also adopted as the primary version of the game played on Native American reservations in the US and Canada by Iroquois and other Native peoples.[5][6] It is the only sport in which the American indigenous people are sanctioned to compete lacrosse field positions diagram, participating as the Iroquois Nationals.[7] However, many field lacrosse enthusiasts viewed the new version of the sport with negativity.[8]

The first professional box lacrosse games were held in That summer, the arena owners formed the International Lacrosse League, featuring four teams: the Montreal Canadiens, Montreal Maroons, Toronto Maple Leafs, and Cornwall Colts.[9] The league lasted only two seasons.[10] In the wake of the original International Lacrosse League opened the American Box Lacrosse League featuring six teams: two in New York City, and one each in Brooklyn, Toronto, Boston, and Baltimore. The league played to small crowds on outdoor fields such as Yankee Stadium and Fenway Park, before closing midway through its inaugural season.[11] Lacrosse was officially declared Canada's National Summer Sport with the passage of the National Sports Act (Bill C) on May 12, [12][13]

The first box lacrosse match conducted in Australia came about as part of a fund raising appeal for the Queen Victoria Hospital in Melbourne. The Victorian Lacrosse Association was approached by the appeal committee to stage a lacrosse match as part of a multi sport carnival at the Plaza (Wattle Path Palais) ballroom at St Kilda on 1 July [14] After a lightning six-a-side (outdoor) tournament format was successfully carried out a few weeks prior,[15] it was decided to play six-a-side for this exhibition game between MCC and a composite team from other clubs, with players wearing rubber shoes and using a softer ball for the match.[16] Newspaper articles at the time suggest that the sport may have even been created in Australia, with P. J. Lally of the famous Canadian lacrosse stick manufacturing company requesting a copy of the rules of the game from the VLA Secretary.[17][18][19] Bybox lacrosse matches were being played in Adelaide,[20]Brisbane,[21] and Perth.[22] This new version of the game however did not overtake the traditional version of lacrosse in popularity in Australia as happened in Canada.[23]

The Canadian Lacrosse Association began sponsoring box lacrosse. Inthe Mann Cup, the most prestigious lacrosse trophy in Canada,[24] was contended for under box lacrosse rules carroll girls basketball the first time. Previously, the national senior men's lacrosse championship, awarded sincewas competed for under field lacrosse rules. The Mann Cup is an annual tournament that presents the champion of the Western Lacrosse Association and Major Series Lacrosse in a best of seven national championship.[25][26] A few years later, inthe Minto Cup, began being awarded under box lacrosse rules to the junior men's champions. Currently the Canadian Lacrosse Association oversees lacrosse field positions diagram Mann Cup, the Minto Cup, the Presidents Cup (Senior B national championship) the Founders Cup (Junior B national championship) all under box lacrosse rules.[27]

Briefly ina professional box lacrosse league started up in California, called the Pacific Coast Lacrosse Association. This four team league also folded shortly after opening.[28] Professional box lacrosse did not return to the United States again until when the Portland Adanacs and Detroit Olympics franchises played in the National Sez berlin badminton preise Association, a circuit that folded after one summer season.[29]

A new professional indoor lacrosse league was created in the s with the formation of the original National Lacrosse League. This league opened in with teams in Montreal, Toronto, Rochester, Syracuse, Philadelphia, and Maryland. For the season, Rochester moved to Boston, Syracuse moved to Quebec City, and Toronto moved to Long Island. Thus, by its second year, the original NLL was playing in all major league arenas: the Colisée de Québec, the Montreal Forum, the Boston Garden, Nassau Coliseum, the Spectrum, and the Capital Centre. When the two wealthier '75 NLL franchises, Philadelphia and Maryland, finished out of the playoffs, and with Montreal losing access to the fabled Montreal Forum in the upcoming season due to the Montreal Olympic Games, the league folded after two lacrosse field positions diagram due to financial uncertainty.[30][31]

The rebirth of professional box lacrosse in the United States came on March 13,with the formation of the Eagle Pro Box Lacrosse League, which was incorporated by Russ Cline and Chris Fritz.[32] The league originated with four teams: the Philadelphia Wings, Lacrosse field positions diagram Jersey Saints, Washington Wave, and Baltimore Thunder, and unlike box lacrosse generally, was played during the winter.[33] The league rebranded itself as the Major Indoor Lacrosse League (MILL) immediately after its inaugural season, and in renamed itself again, this time to the NLL, lacrosse field positions diagram. Inthe NLL entered into the Canadian market for the first time with the Ontario Raiders.[32] Although five of the league's nine teams are based in American cities, more than two-thirds of the players are Canadian.[34]

Rules[edit]

Players, equipment and officials[edit]

During play, lacrosse field positions diagram, a team consists of six players: a goaltender and five "runners", lacrosse field positions diagram. A runner is any non-goalkeeper position player, including forwards, lacrosse field positions diagram, transition players, and defenders. Runners usually specialize in one of these roles and substitute off the field when the ball moves from one end to the other. When the sport originated teams played with six runners.[3] However, in the sixth runner, a position called rover, was eliminated.[35] The goalkeeper can be replaced by another runner, often when a delayed penalty has been called on the other team or at the end of games by teams that are behind to help score goals.[33][36]

A player's lacrosse stick must be between 40 inches (&#;m) and 46 inches (&#;m) in length (youth levels may use shorter sticks). In most box lacrosse leagues, the use of a traditional wooden stick is allowed, lacrosse field positions diagram. However, almost no lacrosse players use wooden sticks anymore, preferring aluminum or another metal, and a plastic head.[37] In the NLL, wooden lacrosse sticks are not allowed.[33] Besides a lacrosse stick, each player must also wear a certain amount of protective equipment, including a lacrosse helmet with face mask, lacrosse gloves, arm and shoulder pads, and back/kidney pads. Rib pads are optional in some leagues.[38]

In some box leagues, especially the NLL, the five "runners" wear helmets lacrosse field positions diagram designed for box lacrosse. These helmets consist of a hockey helmet with a box lacrosse face mask attached lacrosse field positions diagram of a hockey cage.[39]

During a typical game the number of officials can range from one to three, depending on the league and level of play. In most games there are at least two referees: a lead official and a trail official.[40] In NLL games there are three officials per game.[33]

Goaltender[edit]

See also: Goaltender (box lacrosse)

The goaltender's responsibility is to prevent the opposition from scoring goals by directly defending the net. Box lacrosse goaltenders equipment includes upper body gear (measuring no more than 3 inches (&#;cm) up and 5 lacrosse field positions diagram (13&#;cm) out off the shoulder—much larger than similar gear for field lacrosse or ice hockey goaltenders), large shin guards that must measure no more than 11 inches (28&#;cm) at the knee, lacrosse field positions diagram inches (23&#;cm) at the top of the shin and 7 inches (18&#;cm) at the ankle, and a field lacrosse helmet or ice hockey goalie mask.

The 9 feet (&#;m) to 9&#;feet 3&#;inches (&#;m) radius area surrounding the net is called the "crease". Players except for the goaltender may not enter the crease while playing the ball. Punishments for crease infractions include a lux adorna cashmere sport of possession, lacrosse field positions diagram of the time-clock, or a possible two-minute penalty depending on the infraction. Opposing players may not make contact with the goaltender while he is in the crease. Once he leaves the crease, however, he loses all goaltender privileges.[33]

Even as box lacrosse grows in the United States, the American goalkeeper is a rarity. The skills required to be a successful field lacrosse goaltender and a successful box lacrosse goaltender are very different and do not lend well to one another.[41]

Defenders[edit]

A defender is a player position whose primary responsibility is to prevent the opposing team from scoring. Unlike in field lacrosse where some defensive players carry longer sticks, all box lacrosse defenders play with a maximum 46 inches (&#;m) long stick.[42] Defensive tactics include cross checking (where a player uses the shaft of his stick to push the opposition player off balance), body checking (where a player makes contact with the opposition player in order to slow him down), and stick checking lacrosse field positions diagram a player makes contact with the opposition player's stick in order to knock the ball loose).[43]

Transition[edit]

A transition player is a player whose responsibility is primarily to play during defensive situations with an offensive mindset. The goal of this player is to create fast breaks and scoring opportunities.[42][44]

Attack[edit]

An attack is a player position on the field whose responsibility is primarily offensive. Typically, a Attack is dominant throwing with one hand or the other, and will primarily play on that side of the floor. Some players, known as creasemen, do not focus on one side or the other. These players instead focus their offensive attention near the crease area in front of the goaltender.[42]

Playing area[edit]

The playing area of box lacrosse is typically an ice hockey rink during the summer months. The playing surface is usually the concrete floor underneath the melted ice. Generally the playing area is feet (55&#;m) to feet (61&#;m) in length and 80 feet (24&#;m) to 90 feet (27&#;m) in width.[45] The NLL plays on artificial turf placed on top of the ice.[33] Some leagues, and teams that have dedicated box lacrosse arenas (such as the Iroquois), have outfitted their playing surface with artificial turf similar to the NLL.[6]

Box lacrosse goal dimensions are traditionally 4 feet (&#;m) wide by 4 feet (&#;m) tall. In the NLL, the dimensions are slightly larger at 4&#;feet 9&#;inches (&#;m) wide by 4 feet (&#;m) tall.[33] These nets are significantly smaller than field lacrosse nets which measure 6 feet (&#;m) wide by 6 feet (&#;m) tall.[46]

Duration and tie-breaking methods[edit]

A traditional game played under the rules of the Canadian Lacrosse Association consists of three periods of 20 minutes each (similar to ice hockey), with the teams changing ends each period. The NLL plays four minute quarters rather than three periods.[33] If the game is tied at the end of regulation play, a 5-minute overtime (15 in NLL) can be played. Overtime may or may not be sudden victory, depending on the league.[33][47]

Ball in and out of play[edit]

Referee placing the ball while opponents line up for a face-off.

Each period, and after each goal scored, play is restarted with a face-off. If a ball travels over the boards and outside of the playing area, play is restarted by possession being awarded to the opposing team to that which last touched the ball.[33]

During play, teams may substitute players in and out freely. Sometimes this is referred to as "on the fly" substitution. Substitution must occur within the designated exchange area in front of the players bench in order to be legal. The sport utilizes a shot clock and the attacking team must take a shot on goal within 30 seconds of gaining possession of the ball. In addition, players must advance the ball from their own defensive end to the offensive half of the floor within 10 seconds (8 in NLL).[33][36]

Penalties[edit]

For most penalties, the offending player is sent to the penalty box and his team has to play without him and with one less player for a short amount of time. Most penalties last for two minutes unless a major penalty has been assessed. The team that has taken the penalty is said to be playing shorthanded while the other team is on the power play.[42]

A two-minute minor penalty is often called for lesser infractions such as slashing, tripping, elbowing, roughing, too many players, illegal equipment, holding, or interference. Five-minute major penalties are called for especially violent instances of most minor infractions that result in intentional injury to an opponent, as well as for fighting. Players are released from the penalty box when either the penalty time expires, or the opposition scores a goal (or three goals for the instance of a major penalty).[33]

At the officials' discretion a ten-minute misconduct penalty may be assessed. These are served in full by the penalized player, but his team may immediately substitute another player on the playing area unless a minor or major penalty is assessed in conjunction with the misconduct (a "two-and-ten" or "five-and-ten"). In that case, the team designates another player to serve the minor or major; both players go to the penalty box, but only the designee may not be replaced, and he is released upon the expiration of the two or five minutes. In addition, game misconducts are assessed for deliberate intent to inflict severe injury on an opponent. A player who receives a game misconduct is ejected and may not return to play. Receiving two major penalties in a game risks a game misconduct.[33]

A penalty shot, where a player from the non-offending team is given an attempt to score a goal without opposition from any defending players except the goaltender, may be awarded under certain circumstances. By rule, teams lacrosse field positions diagram have at least three runners in play. If a team commits a third penalty resulting in a "three man down" situation a penalty shot is awarded in favor of having the offending player serve in the penalty box. A penalty shot may also be awarded, at the referee's discretion, if a defensive player causes a foul to prevent a goal (by throwing his stick, holding, lacrosse field positions diagram, or by deliberately displacing the goal, or a defensive player intentionally falls and covers a ball in his own team's crease).[33] In the NLL, a penalty shot is awarded against any team taking a too-many-men penalty daytona sports radio the final two minutes of the game or overtime.

Fighting[edit]

Similar to fighting in ice hockey, fighting is tolerated in professional box lacrosse. Professional players are not automatically subject to ejection, lacrosse field positions diagram, but incur a five-minute major penalty. In Canadian Lacrosse Association play, players are assessed a five-minute major penalty plus a game misconduct. Fighting in youth or club level box lacrosse is typically penalized with expulsion and suspensions. Inwhen the Six Nations created the new Mohawk lacrosse league, fighting was specifically targeted as unacceptable. Violators were ejected from the game in which the altercation occurred and given a minimum three game suspension.[48]

International competition[edit]

Box lacrosse is the most popular version of the sport in the Czech Republic.[49] It is also played to a marginal degree in Australia, primarily by players who have played field lacrosse.[50] Club level box lacrosse leagues in the United States have increased the number of players exposed to the sport, including the: Baltimore Indoor Lacrosse League,[51] the Philadelphia Box Lacrosse Association,[52] and the Metro Area Box Lacrosse League.[53]

The first world championship of box lacrosse, "The Nations in ", was staged in several arenas in British Columbia, Canada in July involving teams representing the United States, Australia, lacrosse field positions diagram, Canada East, Canada West and the Iroquois Nationals. Canada West (Coquitlam Adanacs)[29] defeated the Iroquois in the nationally televised world championship game from Pacific Coliseum in Vancouver. This was the first time in history that competitors from the Indigenous peoples of the Americas represented themselves in an athletic world championship competition.

The second international box lacrosse tournament was held inwith the inaugural World Indoor Lacrosse Championships. The competitors were national teams from Australia, Canada, the Czech Republic, the Iroquois Nationals, Scotland, and the United States.[54]

The WILC was hosted by the Onondaga Nation which marks the first time an international sporting event has been held on indigenous land.[55][56] Thirteen teams competed in the championship: Australia, Canada, Czech Republic, England, Finland, Germany, Iroquois Nationals, Ireland, Israel, Serbia, Switzerland, Turkey, and the United States.[57]

Canada, Iroquois Nationals and the United States have won gold, silver, and bronze respectively in each of the World Indoor Lacrosse Championships held. Canada has yet to lose an international game in box lacrosse.

Other international tournaments have been played. Annually, the European Lacrosse Federation holds the Aleš Hřebeský Memorial tournament in Prague. This is the largest European box lacrosse tournament.[49] In andthe Heritage Cup was played between the United States and Canada featuring mostly players that were members of NLL teams.[58][59]

Women[edit]

Historically, box lacrosse has been exclusively a men's sport. Women who played the sport of lacrosse typically played the women's field lacrosse version.[60] Recently, Ontario, Alberta, Nova Scotia and British Columbia have established girls' and women's box lacrosse leagues.[61][62]

During the NLL season, goaltender Ginny Capicchioni appeared in two preseason and one regular season games to become the only woman to make an appearance in the NLL.[41][63]

Women's Box Lacrosse (News and Articles)

See also[edit]

References[edit]

[edit]

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Bibliography[edit]

External links[edit]

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lacrosse field positions diagram

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