Uofl basketball uniforms

uofl basketball uniforms

Shop for Louisville Cardinals jerseys at the Louisville Cardinals Basketball Shop. Browse our selection of basketball uniforms for men, women. licensed Louisville jerseys, University of Louisville Basketball uniforms and #45 Louisville Cardinals adidas Swingman Basketball Jersey - Black. of those uniforms worn at Louisville Live by members of the UofL women's basketball team, is NOT a color generally associated with UofL.

Uofl basketball uniforms - think

The Louisville men’s basketball program will wear 1985-86 throwback uniforms during its Louisville Live tipoff event at Churchill Downs on Saturday evening. 

The annual preseason event, which has been dubbed “Downs After Dark: Horses and Hoops,” will be staged amid an evening of thoroughbred horse racing. Members of the 1986 national championship team will be in attendance, signing autographs as the current Cardinals take the court.

With that, Louisville will wear uniforms that are reminiscent of what that team wore, with a black wordmark and numbers outlined in red on a white jersey. There’s also a traditional striping pattern on the collar, waistband and bottom of the shorts, as well as a the Cardinals’ “Dunking Bird” logo on the sides.

Louisville has worn similar throwback uniforms in the past, including against Duke in 2015 and Syracuse in 2018. 

The Cardinals won their second national title in 1985-86, knocking off the Blue Devils, 72-69, at Reunion Arena in Dallas. Last season marked the 35th anniversary of the run to the title, but the program was unable to hold an on-court celebration due to the pandemic.

As for the event, a portable court will be place on the plaza inside Gate 1 at Churchill Downs. Gates open at 5 p.m., the first horse race starts at 6 p.m. and the basketball festivities begin at 7:15 p.m.

Photo courtesy of @Bigticket_sc on Twitter.

Источник: [https://torrent-igruha.org/3551-portal.html]
  • TheBookman avatar

    Posted on Sep 21st, 2021, 10:32 PM, , User Since 229 months ago, User Post Count: 8964

    • Sep 21st, 2021, 10:32 PM
    • 229 months
    • 8964

    Of course, we all know - as Seedy K and others have pointed out - that gold, the vivid color of those uniforms worn at Louisville Live by members of the UofL women’s basketball team, is NOT a color generally associated with UofL. However, speaking as one fan, I thought they looked very classy, and I’m glad they opted to dress differently than the men’s team. They deserve their own identity and those uniforms provided it!

  • Discussion
  • wku79 avatar

    Posted on Sep 22nd, 2021, 3:05 PM, , User Since 154 months ago, User Post Count: 7782

    • Sep 22nd, 2021, 3:05 PM
    • 154 months
    • 7782

    Yea, I liked them, even though I got a dissenting opinion from my daughter that was with me. Nothing wrong with something a little different every now and then.

  • wku79 avatar

    Posted on Sep 22nd, 2021, 6:58 PM, , User Since 154 months ago, User Post Count: 7782

    • Sep 22nd, 2021, 6:58 PM
    • 154 months
    • 7782

    user generated

  • Posted on Sep 23rd, 2021, 7:27 AM, , User Since 41 months ago, User Post Count: 3255

    • Sep 23rd, 2021, 7:27 AM
    • 41 months
    • 3255

    With the dunking Cardinal on the shorts? Like to see those hit the court a few times this season.

  • uoflcardfan77 avatar

    Posted on Sep 23rd, 2021, 8:13 AM, , User Since 109 months ago, User Post Count: 10765

    • Sep 23rd, 2021, 8:13 AM
    • 109 months
    • 10765

    Those aren't gold. They're Cardinal Beak Yellow.

  • TheBookman avatar

    Posted on Sep 23rd, 2021, 8:23 AM, , User Since 229 months ago, User Post Count: 8964

    • Sep 23rd, 2021, 8:23 AM
    • 229 months
    • 8964

    Aha! Maybe then they can be considered a UofL color. Good point!

  • uoflcardfan77 avatar

    Posted on Sep 23rd, 2021, 11:34 AM, , User Since 109 months ago, User Post Count: 10765

    • Sep 23rd, 2021, 11:34 AM
    • 109 months
    • 10765

    That works for me.

  • Posted on Sep 23rd, 2021, 12:02 PM, , User Since 229 months ago, User Post Count: 530

    • Sep 23rd, 2021, 12:02 PM
    • 229 months
    • 530

    I used to usher the basketball games. Out of towners would ask why we wore yellow shirts. I always replied it was Cardinal Beak Yellow and got a good response.

  • Posted on Sep 28th, 2021, 7:34 PM, , User Since 229 months ago, User Post Count: 808

    • Sep 28th, 2021, 7:34 PM
    • 229 months
    • 808

    Technically I believe that yellow color is one of our colors…red, black, white and yellow

  • madisoncard1979 avatar

    Posted on Sep 29th, 2021, 4:32 PM, , User Since 97 months ago, User Post Count: 685

    • Sep 29th, 2021, 4:32 PM
    • 97 months
    • 685

    TheBookman said... (original post) Of course, we all know - as Seedy K and others have pointed out - that gold, the vivid color of those uniforms worn at Louisville Live by member...

    I will try this once again. I have read that the yellow jerseys are in support of childhood cancers.

  • Posted on Sep 29th, 2021, 10:03 PM, , User Since 193 months ago, User Post Count: 20538

    • Sep 29th, 2021, 10:03 PM
    • 193 months
    • 20538

    Why would one be "in support of childhood cancer"?

  • TheBookman avatar

    Posted on Sep 30th, 2021, 9:19 AM, , User Since 229 months ago, User Post Count: 8964

    • Sep 30th, 2021, 9:19 AM
    • 229 months
    • 8964

    Reminds me of the stadium announcers who talk about being in support of “breast awareness,” as if most men were not already ‘aware of breasts.’

Источник: [https://torrent-igruha.org/3551-portal.html]

Louisville Cardinals men's basketball

Louisville Cardinals men's basketball
Louisville Cardinals wordmark.svg
UniversityUniversity of Louisville
First season1911
All-time record1,882*–933 (.669)
Athletic directorVince Tyra
Head coachChris Mack (4th season)
ConferenceAtlantic Coast Conference
LocationLouisville, Kentucky
ArenaKFC Yum! Center (2010–present)
(Capacity: 22,090)
Freedom Hall (1956–2010)
(Capacity: 18,865)
NicknameCardinals
Student section"The Ville'ns"
ColorsRed and black[1]
   
1980, 1986, 2013*
1959, 1972, 1975, 1980, 1982, 1983, 1986, 2005, 2012*, 2013*
1959, 1972, 1975, 1980, 1982, 1983, 1986, 1997, 2005, 2008, 2009, 2012*, 2013*, 2015*
1951, 1959, 1961, 1967, 1968, 1972, 1974, 1975, 1978, 1979, 1980, 1982, 1983, 1984, 1986, 1988, 1989, 1993, 1994, 1996, 1997, 2005, 2008, 2009, 2012*, 2013*, 2014*, 2015*
1951, 1959, 1961, 1964, 1967, 1968, 1972, 1974, 1975, 1977, 1978, 1979, 1980, 1981, 1982, 1983, 1984, 1986, 1988, 1989, 1990, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1999, 2000, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012*, 2013*, 2014*, 2015*, 2017, 2019
1928, 1929, 1978, 1980, 1981, 1983, 1986, 1988, 1989, 1990, 1993, 1994, 1995, 2003, 2005, 2009, 2012*, 2013*, 2014*
1967, 1968, 1969, 1971, 1972, 1974, 1975, 1977, 1979, 1980, 1981, 1983, 1984, 1986, 1987, 1988, 1990, 1993, 1994, 2005, 2009, 2013*, 2014*
*Appearances Vacated by NCAA, along with 123 wins

The Louisville Cardinals men's basketball team is the men's college basketball program representing the University of Louisville (U of L) in the Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC) of NCAA Division I. The Cardinals have officially won two NCAA championships in 1980 and 1986 (with the 2013 title being vacated); and have officially been to 8 Final Fours (with the 2012 and 2013 appearances being vacated) in 38 official NCAA tournament appearances while compiling 61 tournament wins.[2][3]

Due to an FBI criminal investigation into illegal benefits and actions by college basketball coaches, financial advisers, and others, on September 27, 2017, head coach Rick Pitino and athletic director Tom Jurich were placed on administrative leave and were later fired.[4] Two days later, assistant David Padgett, a former star player under Pitino at Louisville, was named as acting head coach.[5] On February 20, 2018, the NCAA vacated the 2013 NCAA title.[6] On March 27, 2018, it was announced that the University of Louisville signed Chris Mack to a seven-year contract as head coach.[7]

History[edit]

See also: List of Louisville Cardinals men's basketball seasons

"Peck" Hickman era (1944–1967)[edit]

Bernard "Peck" Hickman's 1944 team finished with a 16–3 record and started a string of 46 consecutive winning seasons, which was an NCAA record.[8]

Men's basketball team, 1914, CN Caldwell, captain
U of L winning percentage by year
U of L all-time wins/losses graph

Hickman led Louisville to its first championship on a national level by winning the NAIB Tournament in 1948.[9] In 1956, led by All-American Charlie Tyra, the Cardinals won the NIT Championship.[10] In 1956 his team was placed on two years probation, to include bans on postseason play, by the NCAA due to recruiting violations.[11] In 1959, Louisville made its first NCAA Final Four appearance behind the play of All-American Don Goldstein.

The Cardinals never had a losing season in Hickman's 23 seasons as head coach.[12] He coached 11 20-win teams, appeared in five NCAA tournaments, coached six NIT appearances and finished with a 443–183 overall record, a .708 winning percentage that ranks him in the top 45 all time.

John Dromo (1967–1971)[edit]

John Dromo was Hickman's assistant for 17 years and succeeded him at head coach in 1967. In four seasons as head coach, Dromo led the Cardinals to a 68–23 record (.747 winning percentage) and the 1967 Missouri Valley Conference title.

A heart attack during the 1970–71 season forced Dromo to retire. His assistant, Howard Stacey, was named interim head coach for the final 20 games of the season.[13]

Denny Crum era (1971–2001)[edit]

Denny Crum was hired as head coach from his alma mater, UCLA, where he was the top assistant coach to John Wooden. It was under the guidance of Crum that Louisville became a college basketball power. In his first season, he guided the Cardinals to the NCAA Final Four, becoming the first coach ever to go to a Final Four in his first season as a head coach. Overall, Crum had six Final Fours with the Cardinals (1972, 1975, 1980, 1982, 1983, 1986). He is fifth all-time in Final Four appearances.[14]

The Cardinals won the 1980 NCAA Tournament championship by defeating UCLA 59–54. Six years later, Louisville would overcome Duke 72–69 for a second title. Crum is one of only 11 coaches to win two or more national championships.[15] He was named National Coach of the Year in 1980, 1983 and 1986.

He took the Cardinals to 23 NCAA tournaments, where they had an overall record of 43–21. While in the Metro Conference, the Cardinals won 12 regular season titles and 11 tournament championships. In its 19 years of naming a champion, the Metro had Louisville as first or second place 17 times. In 1993, Crum became the second fastest coach to reach 500 wins.[16]

Crum was inducted into the Naismith Hall of Fame in 1994. He retired in 2001 with a career record of 675–295 (.696 winning percentage) over 30 seasons. He was a member of the College Basketball Hall of Fame's inaugural class in 2006.

Rick Pitino era (2001–2017)[edit]

Rick Pitino was hired in 2001 after four years as head coach of the Boston Celtics, and previously as head coach of Louisville's in-state rival, Kentucky.[17]

Pitino guided the Cardinals to the NCAA Tournament in 12 of 15 seasons, reaching the Elite Eight six times and the Final Four three times (2005, 2012, and 2013). His teams won six conference tournament championships and four regular season titles. The Cardinals won at least 20 games every season since Pitino's first season at Louisville. Through the 2015–16 season, Pitino amassed a record of 391–134 (.745) during his time at Louisville.

Pitino was selected to the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame in 2013,[18] and was under contract through the 2025–26 season.[19]

The University of Louisville self-imposed a postseason ban for the 2015–16 season amid an ongoing NCAA investigation over an escort sex scandal involving recruits between 2010 and 2014. The ban included both the ACC Tournament and the NCAA Tournament.[20][21]

On June 15, 2017, the NCAA charged Rick Pitino for failure to monitor his basketball program which was involved in a sex-for-pay scandal. He was suspended for the first five games of the ACC season in 2017–18.[22]

On September 26, 2017, federal prosecutors in New York announced that the school was under investigation for an alleged "pay for play" scheme involving recruits at Louisville.[23][24] The allegations state that an Adidas executive conspired to pay $100,000 to the family of a top-ranked national recruit to play at Louisville and to represent Adidas when he turned pro.[23][25] The criminal complaint did not name Louisville specifically but appeared to involve the recruitment of Brian Bowen, a late, surprise commit to the school.[26][27] On September 27, 2017, Pitino and athletic director Tom Jurich were placed on administrative leave.[4]

On October 26, 2017, Rick Pitino was fired as the head coach of Louisville Men's Basketball.[28]

On February 20, 2018, the NCAA ruled that Louisville must vacate its records from 2011 to 2015. This included 123 wins, the 2013 NCAA title, and a 2012 Final Four appearance.[29]

Chris Mack era (2018–present)[edit]

On March 27, 2018, Xavier head coach Chris Mack agreed to terms on a seven-year contract worth about $4 million annually to become the next head coach at Louisville.[30] Louisville was the first ever school to hire away a head coach whose previous team was a 1 seed in the NCAA tournament. Mack has had a notable start to his Louisville tenure, recruiting a top-5 2019 class that included a 5-star player, four 4-star players, and a three-star player. Picked to finish 11th in the 2018 preseason ACC poll, Mack led the Cardinals to a 20–14 season peaking at #15 in the AP polls and finishing in seventh place in the ACC standings with signature wins over #9 Michigan State, #12 North Carolina, and #11 Virginia Tech and tough losses to #5 Tennessee, Marquette, #22 Florida State, and #2 Duke.[31][32][33]

Notable achievements[edit]

As of the end of the 2015–16 season, Louisville had an all-time 1778–892 record in 102 seasons of intercollegiate basketball ranking 10th in all-time victories and seventh in all-time winning percentage among NCAA Division I schools. From 1944 to 1990, Louisville had an NCAA-record 46 straight winning seasons, winning 20 or more games on 31 occasions during that period.

Louisville has made 42 NCAA Tournament appearances (5th all-time) and 15 NIT appearances. The Cardinals have reached the NCAA Tournament 32 of the last 40 years (12 of the last 15, 14 of the last 18 years, 20 of last 25). Since the NCAA began keeping Sweet Sixteen appearance records in 1975, Louisville's 21 Sweet Sixteens are 5th all-time behind North Carolina (26), Kentucky (25), Duke (24), and Kansas (22). The Cardinals have reached the Elite Eight on 14 occasions, including five of the past nine seasons. Louisville is sixth in tournament victories (75) with a 75–41 overall NCAA Tournament record, reaching the Final Four 10 times.

Louisville is the only school in the nation to have claimed the championship of three major national post-season tournaments including the 1948 NAIA championship, the 1956 NIT title and the 19801986 and 2013 NCAA championships. Simultaneously, Louisville is the only school in NCAA history to have a Men's Basketball National Championship vacated, along with 2 Final Four appearances.

By the numbers[edit]

  • NCAA vacated all wins from 2011 to 2015

Post-season results[edit]

National championships[edit]

1948 NAIA Tournament Championship[edit]

Main article: 1948 NAIA Division I Men's Basketball Tournament

1956 NIT Championship[edit]

Main article: 1956 National Invitation Tournament

1980 NCAA Tournament Championship[edit]

Main article: 1979–80 Louisville Cardinals men's basketball team

1986 NCAA Tournament Championship[edit]

Main article: 1985–86 Louisville Cardinals men's basketball team

2013 NCAA Tournament Championship (Vacated)[edit]

Main article: 2012–13 Louisville Cardinals men's basketball team

NCAA Tournament Final Four history[edit]

NCAA Tournament Most Outstanding Player[edit]

NCAA Tournament seeding history[edit]

The NCAA began seeding the tournament with the 1979 edition.

* – Overall number one seed. The committee began ranking 1 seeds in 2004.

Complete NCAA Tournament results[edit]

The Cardinals have appeared in the NCAA Tournament 39* (43) times. Their combined record is 61–44* (76–44).

* – NCAA vacated all wins from 2011 to 2015.

Year Seed Round Opponent Result
1951Sweet SixteenKentuckyL 68–79
1959First Round
Sweet Sixteen
Elite Eight
Final Four
National 3rd Place Game
Eastern Kentucky
Kentucky
Michigan State
West Virginia
Cincinnati
W 77–63
W 76–61
W 88–81
L 79–94
L 85–98
1961First Round
Sweet Sixteen
Regional 3rd Place Game
Ohio
Ohio State
Morehead State
W 76–70
L 55–56
W 83–61
1964First RoundOhioL 69–71 OT
1967Sweet Sixteen
Regional 3rd Place Game
SMU
Kansas
L 81–83
L 68–70
1968Sweet Sixteen
Regional 3rd Place Game
Houston
Kansas State
L 75–91
W 93–63
1972Sweet Sixteen
Elite Eight
Final Four
National 3rd Place Game
Southwest Louisiana
Kansas State
UCLA
North Carolina
W 88–84
W 72–65
L 77–96
L 91–105
1974Sweet Sixteen
Regional 3rd Place Game
Oral Roberts
Creighton
L 93–96
L 71–80
1975First Round
Sweet Sixteen
Elite Eight
Final Four
National 3rd Place Game
Rutgers
Cincinnati
Maryland
UCLA
Syracuse
W 91–78
W 78–63
W 96–82
L 74–75 OT
W 96–88 OT
1977First RoundUCLAL 79–87
1978First Round
Sweet Sixteen
St. John's
DePaul
W 76–68
L 89–90 2OT
1979#3Second Round
Sweet Sixteen
#6 South Alabama
#2 Arkansas
W 69–66
L 62–73
1980#2Second Round
Sweet Sixteen
Elite Eight
Final Four
National Championship
#7 Kansas State
#6 Texas A&M
#1 LSU
#5 Iowa
#8 UCLA
W 71–69 OT
W 66–55 OT
W 86–66
W 80–72
W 59–54
1981#4Second Round#5 ArkansasL 73–74
1982#3Second Round
Sweet Sixteen
Elite Eight
Final Four
#11 Middle Tennessee
#2 Minnesota
#4 UAB
#1 Georgetown
W 81–56
W 67–61
W 75–68
L 46–50
1983#1Second Round
Sweet Sixteen
Elite Eight
Final Four
#8 Tennessee
#4 Arkansas
#3 Kentucky
#1 Houston
W 70–57
W 65–63
W 80–68 OT
L 81–94
1984#5First Round
Second Round
Sweet Sixteen
#12 Morehead State
#4 Tulsa
#1 Kentucky
W 72–59
W 69–67
L 67–72
1986#2First Round
Second Round
Sweet Sixteen
Elite Eight
Final Four
National Championship
#15 Drexel
#7 Bradley
#3 North Carolina
#8 Auburn
#11 LSU
#1 Duke
W 93–73
W 82–68
W 94–79
W 84–76
W 88–77
W 72–69
1988#5First Round
Second Round
Sweet Sixteen
#12 Oregon State
#4 BYU
#1 Oklahoma
W 70–61
W 97–76
L 98–108
1989#4First Round
Second Round
Sweet Sixteen
#13 Arkansas–Little Rock
#5 Arkansas
#1 Illinois
W 76–71
W 93–84
L 69–83
1990#4First Round
Second Round
#13 Idaho
#12 Ball State
W 78–59
L 60–62
1992#8First Round
Second Round
#9 Wake Forest
#1 UCLA
W 81–58
L 69–85
1993#4First Round
Second Round
Sweet Sixteen
#13 Delaware
#5 Oklahoma State
#1 Indiana
W 76–70
W 78–63
L 69–82
1994#3First Round
Second Round
Sweet Sixteen
#14 Boise State
#6 Minnesota
#2 Arizona
W 67–58
W 60–55
L 70–82
1995#11First Round#6 MemphisL 56–77
1996#6First Round
Second Round
Sweet Sixteen
#11 Tulsa
#3 Villanova
#2 Wake Forest
W 82–80 OT
W 68–64
L 59–60
1997#6First Round
Second Round
Sweet Sixteen
Elite Eight
#11 Massachusetts
#3 New Mexico
#10 Texas
#1 North Carolina
W 65–57
W 64–63
W 78–63
L 74–97
1999#10First Round#10 CreightonL 58–62
2000#7First Round#10 GonzagaL 66–77
2003#4First Round
Second Round
#13 Austin Peay
#12 Butler
W 86–64
L 79–71
2004#10First Round#7 XavierL 70–80
2005#4First Round
Second Round
Sweet Sixteen
Elite Eight
Final Four
#13 Louisiana–Lafayette
#5 Georgia Tech
#1 Washington
#7 West Virginia
#1 Illinois
W 68–62
W 76–54
W 93–79
W 93–85 OT
L 57–72
2007#6First Round
Second Round
#11 Stanford
#3 Texas A&M
W 78–58
L 69–72
2008#3First Round
Second Round
Sweet Sixteen
Elite Eight
#14 Boise State
#6 Oklahoma
#2 Tennessee
#1 North Carolina
W 79–61
W 78–48
W 79–60
L 73–83
2009#1First Round
Second Round
Sweet Sixteen
Elite Eight
#16 Morehead State
#9 Siena
#12 Arizona
#2 Michigan State
W 74–54
W 79–72
W 103–64
L 52–64
2010#9First Round#8 CaliforniaL 62–77
2011#4Second Round#13 Morehead StateL 61–62
2012*#4Second Round
Third Round
Sweet Sixteen
Elite Eight
Final Four
Davidson
New Mexico
Michigan State
Florida
Kentucky
W 69–62
W 59–56
W 57–44
W 72–68
L 61–69
2013*#1Second Round
Third Round
Sweet Sixteen
Elite Eight
Final Four
National Title
North Carolina A&T
Colorado State
Oregon
Duke
Wichita State
Michigan
W 79–48
W 82–56
W 77–69
W 85–63
W 72–68
W 82–76
2014*#4Second Round
Third Round
Sweet Sixteen
#13 Manhattan
#5 Saint Louis
#8 Kentucky
W 71–64
W 66–51
L 69–74
2015*#4Second Round
Third Round
Sweet Sixteen
Elite Eight
#13 UC Irvine
#5 Northern Iowa
#8 NC State
#7 Michigan State
W 57–55
W 66–53
W 75–65
L 70–76 OT
2017#2First Round
Second Round
#15 Jacksonville State
#7 Michigan
W 78–63
L 69–73
2019#7First Round#10 MinnesotaL 76–86

Complete NIT results[edit]

The Cardinals have appeared in the National Invitation Tournament (NIT) 15 times. Their combined record is 16–15. They were the 1956 NIT Champions.

Year Round Opponent Result
1952First RoundWKUL 59–62
1953First Round
Quarterfinals
Georgetown
Manhattan
W 92–79
L 66–79
1954First RoundSt. Francis (NY)L 55–60
1955First Round
Quarterfinals
Manhattan
Duquesne
W 91–86
L 66–74
1956Quarterfinals
Semifinals
Finals
Duquesne
Saint Joseph's
Dayton
W 84–72
W 89–79
W 93–80
1966First RoundBoston CollegeL 90–96
1969First Round
Quarterfinals
Fordham
Boston College
W 73–70
L 83–88
1970First RoundOklahomaL 73–74
1971First RoundProvidenceL 58–64
1973First Round
Quarterfinals
American
Notre Dame
W 97–84
L 71–79
1976QuarterfinalsProvidenceL 67–73
1985First Round
Second Round
Quarterfinals
Semifinals
3rd Place Game
Alcorn State
South Florida
Chattanooga
UCLA
Tennessee
W 77–75
W 68–61
W 71–66
L 66–75
L 84–100
2002First Round
Second Round
Princeton
Temple
W 66–65
L 62–65
2006First Round
Second Round
Quarterfinals
Semifinals
Delaware State
Clemson
Missouri State
South Carolina
W 71–54
W 74–68
W 74–56
L 63–78
2018First Round
Second Round
Quarterfinals
Northern Kentucky
Middle Tennessee
Mississippi State
W 66–58
W 84–68
L 56–79

Regular season conference championships[edit]

The Cardinals have won 23 conference regular season championships.

Since the 2014–15 season they have played in the Atlantic Coast Conference. Before that, they belonged to the Kentucky Intercollegiate Athletic Conference from the 1925–26 to 1947–48 seasons, the Ohio Valley Conference for the 1948–49 season, the Missouri Valley Conference from 1964–65 to 1974–75, the Metro Conference from 1975–76 to 1994–95, Conference USA from 1995–96 to 2004–05, the Big East Conference from 2005–06 to 2012–13, and the American Athletic Conference in 2013–14.

They played as an independent school from 1911–12 to 1924–25 and from 1949–50 to 1963–64 (29 total seasons).

Missouri Valley Conference (7)
Metro Conference (12)
  • 1977, 1979, 1980, 1981, 1983, 1984, 1986, 1987, 1988, 1990, 1993, 1994[35]
Conference USA (1)
Big East Conference (2)
American Athletic Conference (1)

Conference tournament championships[edit]

The Cardinal have won 19 conference tournament championships.

Kentucky Intercollegiate Athletic Conference Tournament (2)
Metro Conference Tournament (11)
  • 1978, 1980, 1981, 1983, 1986, 1988, 1989, 1990, 1993, 1994, 1995[35]
Conference USA Tournament (2)
Big East Conference Tournament (3)
  • 2009, 2012 (Vacated), 2013 (Vacated)
American Athletic Tournament (1)

Rivalries[edit]

Kentucky Wildcats[edit]

The Kentucky–Louisville rivalry has been ranked the 2nd best rivalry in college basketball by Bleacher Report and 3rd best rivalry in all of college sports by Basketball Hall of Fame contributor Dick Vitale.[36] Kentucky and Louisville first played against each other in 1913 but stopped playing each other in the 1920s, playing only twelve times between 1913 and 1983. The rivalry was generally dormant with only occasional matchups until the teams met in the 1983 NCAA Tournament. Since then, the two teams have met each year in late December or early January.

Much like the Iron Bowl, the Kentucky–Louisville rivalry is all the more intense because the two schools have consistently been among the nation's elite men's basketball teams for most of the last 50 years. Both schools are also two of the most victorious programs in NCAA men's basketball history; Kentucky is #1 on the list of all-time winningest programs in Division I Men's Basketball and Louisville #26 (#10 including vacated victories). Kentucky has eight national championships while Louisville has two (official)(3 including the vacated 2013 championship) national championships.

Cincinnati Bearcats[edit]

Main article: Cincinnati–Louisville rivalry § Men's Basketball

While predominantly a football rivalry, the proximity and long-standing conference affiliation of Cincinnati and Louisville made this into a key rivalry, particularly in the days of the Metro and Big East conferences. This rivalry went on hiatus in 2014 when Louisville left the American Athletic Conference for the ACC.

Notable Cardinals[edit]

See also: List of University of Louisville people

Retired numbers[edit]

Louisville basketball has honored four former players by retiring their numbers, with a fifth to be officially retired after the 2021–22 season with a ceremony set for January 22, 2022. Except as noted, these are the last players to wear these numbers for a Louisville men's squad:

  • Charlie Tyra #8 – A consensus All-American during the 1956 and 1957 seasons, Charlie Tyra led the University of Louisville to its first NIT title in 1956 and was named the tournament's MVP for his performance. Tyra was named Helms Athletic Foundation All-American in his junior and senior years. One of only five Cardinals to record over 1,000 rebounds in his career, Tyra ranks as the all-time rebounder in U of L history with 1,617. During the 1955–56 season, Tyra pulled down 645 rebounds, a mark that has been bettered by only three other players in NCAA history. He set the Louisville record for most rebounds in a game when he pulled down 38 against Canisius during the 1955–56 season. In his four seasons with Louisville, he helped his teams to a combined record of 88–23 and three straight NIT appearances. Tyra ranks third in career free throws made (448), second in career rebounding average (17.0), fourth in career scoring average (18.2), eighth in career scorers (1,728 points) and eighth in field goals made (640). Tyra is one of only four players in UofL history to score 40 points or more in a game (achieved against Notre Dame when he hit 12 of 16 field goals and all 16 of his free throw attempts). Tyra died on December 29, 2006, at the age of 71. He was drafted #2 by in the Detroit Pistons in the 1957 NBA draft.
  • Wes Unseld #31 – When Wes Unseld ended his career with the University of Louisville following the 1967–68 season, he left as the Cardinals' all-time leading scorer for a three-year player. Today, Unseld ranks 10th on the all-time scoring list, but his career point total of 1,686 is still tops for a three-year player. A consensus All-American during his junior and senior years, Unseld is one of only five other Cardinal players to pull down over 1,000 rebounds in his career. His 1,551 career rebounds ranks second behind Tyra's 1,617. Unseld began his senior season with a 45-point effort against Georgetown College, a UofL record that still stands today. Unseld, chosen as second player overall in the NBA draft by Baltimore, was honored on the All-Missouri Valley Conference team all three years at UofL and the Cardinals were 60–22 during his three seasons. During his junior year, Unseld led the Cardinals to a final No. 2 ranking in both wire service polls. Unseld's 20.6 scoring average still ranks as the top scoring average in Louisville history. His 18.9 rebounding average also ranks as the top average for a Cardinal. While playing on the Cardinals' freshmen team, Unseld averaged 35.8 points and 23.6 rebounds, and hit 68.6 percent from the field.
  • Darrell Griffith #35 – The 1980 Player of the Year and consensus first team All-American led Louisville to four consecutive NCAA tournament appearances, winning the 1980 Championship as he had promised when he committed to his hometown Cardinals. Griffith's career 2333 points and single-season 825 points rank first in Louisville history. He scored in double figures in 41 straight games and 111 of his 126 games with the Cardinals. His play earned him the nickname "Dr. Dunkenstein".[37] He was drafted #2 by the Utah Jazz in the 1980 NBA draft.
  • Pervis Ellison #42 – Ellison won the 1986 NCAA Tournament MOP award after leading the Cardinals to their second NCAA Tournament Championship. A consensus first team All-American in 1989, he is the only Louisville player to score 2000 points and grab 1000 rebounds in a career. His 374 career rejections rank first at Louisville and ranked Ellison third all time in the NCAA when he left in 1989. He was drafted #1 by the Sacramento Kings in the 1989 NBA draft.
  • Russ Smith #2 – Smith, the Cardinals' all-time steals leader with 275 and also fifth in career scoring with 1,908 points, was a consensus first-team All-American in 2013–14 after receiving third-team All-American honors from the National Association of Basketball Coaches and Sporting News in 2012–13, when the Cardinals won their since-vacated third national title. His number retirement ceremony is set for Louisville's January 22, 2022 home game against Notre Dame. The number is being worn by Sam Bearden in the 2021–22 season, but will not be issued in future seasons.

Cardinals in the Hall of Fame[edit]

Louisville has three representatives in the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame: Cardinal All-American and former Washington Bullets All-Star Wes Unseld, who was inducted in 1988, former coach Denny Crum, who was inducted in 1994, and coach Rick Pitino, who was inducted in 2013. Darrell Griffith, a national player of the year and consensus All-American at the University of Louisville, is part of the 2014 induction class for the National Collegiate Basketball Hall of Fame.

National Player of the Year awards[edit]

All-Americans[edit]

Twenty one Louisville players have earned 25 All American selections. 7 players received 8 consensus All-American selections.[38][39]

Consensus selections[edit]

Other selections[edit]

Other major national awards[edit]

Honored jerseys[edit]

Louisville has honored the jerseys of 20 former players. Their numbers remain active.

Conference Player of the Year[edit]

Key[edit]

Co-Players of the Year
Player (X) Denotes the number of times the player has been
awarded the Player of the Year award at that point

Conference Tournament Most Outstanding Player[edit]

1000-point scorers[edit]

As of 2015[update], Louisville has 67 1000-point career scorers, second only to North Carolina for most all time.[40]

Cardinals in the pros[edit]

Ambox current red Asia Australia.svg

This section needs to be updated. Please help update this article to reflect recent events or newly available information.(January 2017)

The Cardinals have had 75 players taken in the NBA Draft, the most recent being Ray Spalding, who was chosen in the 2018 NBA Draft, and Donovan Mitchell, who was chosen in the 2017 NBA Draft. 30 former Cardinal players are playing professional basketball, with six of those currently playing in the NBA.

Louisville Cardinals basketball player Donovan Mitchell
Donovan Mitchell is one of five former Cardinals playing in the NBA in 2020.

Several other former players have played in the NBA, including:

Facilities[edit]

Home courts[edit]

KFC Yum! Center (2010–present)[edit]

Since the 2010–11 season the Cardinals have played their home games at the KFC Yum! Center located along the banks of the Ohio River in downtown Louisville. As of February 7, 2017[update], Louisville has a 114–14 record (.891) in 6 seasons in the KFC Yum! Center.[41][42][failed verification]

The facility has a seating capacity of 22,090 with 71 suites and 62 loge boxes.[43] It is the third-largest in the nation (behind only Syracuse's Carrier Dome, Tennessee's and Rupp Arena). Louisville ranked among the top 3 in attendance in the first three seasons at the KFC Yum! Center.[44] The attendance record of 22,815 was set on March 9, 2013 against #24 Notre Dame.

The playing surface at the KFC Yum! Center is named Denny Crum Court in honor of Hall of Fame coach Denny Crum. The University of Louisville first renamed its home court after Crum in January 2007.[45]

Since the opening of the KFC Yum Center, the University of Louisville has become the most valuable college basketball team in the nation. In 2012 the Cardinals were worth $36.1 million, up nearly 40% from two years earlier, before the Yum Center opened.[46]

Freedom Hall at the Kentucky Fair and Exposition Center

Freedom Hall (1956–2010)[edit]

From 1956 to the completion of the KFC Yum! Center in 2010, the Cardinals played their home games at Freedom Hall. Louisville had a 664–136 record in 54 seasons in Freedom Hall (.83 winning percentage). Freedom Hall has been the site of six NCAA Final Fours, four additional NCAA events and 10 conference tournaments. ESPN College Basketball magazine once named Freedom Hall as the nation's "Best Playing Floor."

Louisville ranked among the top 10 nationally in average home attendance at Freedom Hall for 31 years, including the last 28 in the nation's top five (19,397 in 2009–10, third in the nation). In 2010, a new Freedom Hall attendance record was set when 20,135 fans witnessed the Cardinals defeat the #1 ranked Syracuse Orange in the final University of Louisville game in the arena.[47]

Jefferson County Armory (1945–1972)[edit]

Jefferson County Armory was the primary home of Louisville Cardinals basketball starting in 1945 when Bernard "Peck" Hickman was head coach until the 1957–58 season, when Freedom Hall became their primary home game site. The Cardinals played 10 of their home games in the Jefferson County Armory in 1956–57 and three games in Freedom Hall. Louisville played one game at the armory in 1958–59.In the 1960s the armory was renamed the Louisville Convention Center. The Cardinals played two games at the Convention Center in 1963–64 and three games in the Convention Center in 1964–65. The last game the Cardinals played there was November 30, 1972. Louisville was 153–23 all time at the Jefferson County Armory which is now named the Louisville Gardens.[48][49]

Belknap Gymnasium (1931–1944)[edit]

After playing home games at numerous venues in its early years, the Cardinals moved to the newly constructed Belknap Gymnasium in 1931. The gym housed 600 bleacher seats and the baskets were mounted directly to the wall. Louisville compiled a 56–35 (.615 winning percentage) before moving to the Jefferson County Armory. The gym was razed in 1993 to make way for Lutz Hall.[50]

Practice facilities[edit]

Planet Fitness-Kueber Center (2007–present)[edit]

Since 2007 the Cardinals have practiced at the $15.2 million, 60,000 square feet (5,600 m2) Planet Fitness-Kueber Center on campus. The Planet Fitness-Kueber Center houses the teams basketball offices, practice facilities, film room and training areas.

The facility was named the Yum! Center, until December 2018 when local businessmen Rick and David Kueber donated $3 million to rename the facility.[51]

Controversies and scandals[edit]

1956 recruiting violations[edit]

In 1956 the team was placed on probation for two years by the NCAA, including bans on postseason play, due to recruiting violations.[11]

2015 sex scandal[edit]

Main article: 2015 University of Louisville basketball sex scandal

A former Louisville player, and then Director of Basketball Operations, Andre McGee, arranged and paid for strippers and prostitutes to perform striptease dances and sexual acts for 17 prospective and former basketball players from 2010 to 2014. On October 3, 2015, the book publisher IBJ Custom Publishing released a book entitled "Breaking Cardinal Rules." Based on revelations provided by the local self-described escort, Katina Powell, the book detailed striptease dances and acts of prostitution that Powell and McGee arranged and organized in Minardi Hall over approximately a four-year period.[52]

During the investigation of the allegations, the university self-imposed a ban on the 2016 NCAA Tournament. In June 2016, the NCAA announced that the university would lose four basketball scholarships over the course of four seasons, but there would be no further postseason ban. The NCAA suspended head coach Rick Pitino for five ACC games during the 2017–18 season. The NCAA also ordered the university to vacate all wins from 2011 to 2014 that include ineligible players. The vacated wins include a Final Four appearance in 2012 and an NCAA Tournament Championship in 2013.[53] Luke Hancock's 2013 Final Four Most Valuable Player Award was reinstated by the NCAA because he was found to be innocent of any NCAA rule violations.

2017–18 corruption scandal[edit]

Main article: 2017–18 NCAA Division I men's basketball corruption scandal

As a result of a corruption scandal implicating various schools including Louisville,[54][55][56] on September 27, 2017, Louisville placed head coach Rick Pitino on unpaid administrative leave and athletic directorTom Jurich on paid administrative leave.[57] Rick Pitino and Tom Jurich would then be fired with cause by the University, David Padgett would be selected to replace Rick Pitino as the Interim Head Coach of the men's squad, and Vince Tyra would be selected as Interim Athletic Director.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^"Louisville Athletics - Louisville Sports Information". March 26, 2015. Retrieved April 19, 2017.
  2. ^"2011 NCAA Men's Final Four Statistics"(PDF). 2011 NCAA Men's Basketball Statistics. National Intercollegiate Athletic Association. Retrieved January 15, 2012.
  3. ^"2015–16 Louisville Basketball Guide"(PDF). University of Louisville. Retrieved February 12, 2016.
  4. ^ ab"Louisville's Pitino and Jurich placed on leave". ESPN.com. September 28, 2017. Retrieved September 27, 2017.
  5. ^Medcalf, Myron (September 30, 2017). "David Padgett to take on acting head-coaching duties for Cardinals". ESPN.com. Retrieved March 4, 2018.
  6. ^"Louisville must vacate basketball title, NCAA denies appeal". ESPN.com. January 20, 2018. Retrieved March 4, 2018.
  7. ^"Louisville hires Xavier's Chris Mack as new men's basketball coach". March 27, 2018. Retrieved March 28, 2018.
  8. ^"Louisville Basketball Media Guide". University of Louisville Athletic Department. Retrieved January 15, 2012.
  9. ^"NAIA Division I Men's Basketball"(PDF). NAIA. Archived from the original(PDF) on August 15, 2010. Retrieved December 27, 2011.
  10. ^"NIT Postseason Tournament Results (1950's)". NCAA. Retrieved December 27, 2011.
  11. ^ ab"The Stanford Daily Archives". archives.stanforddaily.com.
  12. ^"Former Hoop Coach/AD Hickman Dies". University of Louisville Athletic Department. Retrieved December 27, 2011.
  13. ^"Louisville Cardinal Head Coaches". University of Louisville. Retrieved January 15, 2012.
  14. ^
Источник: [https://torrent-igruha.org/3551-portal.html]

 

“Louisville Live” is just a little over a week away. Today, the Louisville Men’s Basketball Twitter account tweeted out photos of an exclusive uniform just for the event.

The jersey is black in the front with a red rectangle in the middle that encompasses the white lettering and numbers. The lettering says, “Louisville.” It appears that the red rectangle is either velvet or has some kind of sheen to it. The front also bears an ACC patch and a red Adidas logo. The back of the jersey has the same red rectangle. It also has a “Louisville Live” patch right beneath the neckline and a red cardinal head just to the left both above the red rectangle.

The shorts are red in the front and likely back while black along the sides. Along the side of the waistband, “THE VILLE” is written in big block letters and there are black and red stripes on the band as well. There is a red, old English L in the black area of the shorts along the left thigh. On the right thigh is a red Cardinal head.

So, a team with legitimate Final Four aspirations, a bunch of highly touted recruits, hundreds and hundreds of Louisville fans, and these sweet new and exclusive uniforms make this year’s “Louisville Live” a must see event for Louisville fans. “Louisville Live” is set for Friday, September 27th.

Like this:

LikeLoading...

Источник: [https://torrent-igruha.org/3551-portal.html]

Louisville basketball unveils 2020 postseason uniforms

Look, you guys are welcome to form your own thoughts on this, but I’m going to share mine before I even post the video: They’re too normal. They’re way, way too normal.

Judge for yourself:

It’s pretty straightforward ...

Infra-Reds in 2012 = Final Four

Sleeved Camo Jerseys in 2013 = National Championship

Normal looking uniforms from 2014-19 = No Final Fours

If we wore trash bags from day one through the first Monday in April, I guarantee we’d go 40-0.

The shorts are a little bit funky, and as a lot of people have already pointed out, the reveal video itself is a little weird, so that’s at least something. But still, this could be so much worse, which for us could make things so much better.

Pretty sure you owe us, Adidas. If this postseason doesn’t go swimmingly, twelve months from now we want straight garbage. Like, literal garbage. Literal garbage with numbers on the back. Those are the uniforms.

Make this right.

Источник: [https://torrent-igruha.org/3551-portal.html]

Louisville Cardinals men's huron hockey camp colspan="2">Louisville Cardinals men's basketballLouisville Cardinals wordmark.svgUniversityUniversity of LouisvilleFirst season1911All-time record1,882*–933 (.669)Athletic directorVince TyraHead coachChris Mack (4th season)ConferenceAtlantic Coast ConferenceLocationLouisville, KentuckyArenaKFC Yum! Center (2010–present)
(Capacity: 22,090)
Freedom Hall (1956–2010)
(Capacity: 18,865)NicknameCardinalsStudent section"The Ville'ns"ColorsRed and black[1]
   1980, 1986, 2013*1959, 1972, 1975, 1980, 1982, 1983, 1986, 2005, 2012*, 2013*1959, 1972, 1975, 1980, 1982, 1983, 1986, 1997, 2005, 2008, 2009, 2012*, 2013*, 2015*1951, 1959, 1961, 1967, 1968, 1972, 1974, 1975, 1978, 1979, 1980, 1982, uofl basketball uniforms, 1983, 1984, 1986, 1988, 1989, 1993, uofl basketball uniforms, 1994, 1996, 1997, 2005, 2008, uofl basketball uniforms, 2009, 2012*, 2013*, 2014*, 2015*1951, 1959, 1961, 1964, 1967, 1968, 1972, 1974, 1975, 1977, 1978, 1979, 1980, uofl basketball uniforms, 1981, 1982, 1983, uofl basketball uniforms, 1984, 1986, 1988, 1989, 1990, 1992, 1993, 1994, uofl basketball uniforms, 1996, 1997, 1999, uofl basketball uniforms, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012*, 2013*, 2014*, 2015*, 2017, 20191928, 1929, 1978, 1980, 1981, 1983, 1986, 1988, 1989, 1990, 1993, 1994, 1995, 2003, 2005, 2009, 2012*, 2013*, 2014*1967, 1968, 1969, 1971, 1972, 1974, 1975, 1977, 1979, 1980, 1981, 1983, 1984, 1986, uofl basketball uniforms, 1987, 1988, 1990, 1993, 1994, 2005, 2009, 2013*, 2014**Appearances Vacated by NCAA, uofl basketball uniforms, along with 123 wins

The Louisville Cardinals men's basketball team is the men's college basketball program representing the University of Louisville (U of L) in the Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC) of Skirt sports 13er Division I, uofl basketball uniforms. The Cardinals have officially won two NCAA championships in 1980 and 1986 (with the 2013 title being vacated); and have officially been to 8 Final Fours (with the 2012 and 2013 appearances being vacated) in 38 official NCAA tournament appearances while compiling 61 tournament wins.[2][3]

Due to an FBI criminal investigation into illegal benefits and actions by college basketball coaches, financial advisers, and others, on September 27, 2017, head coach Rick Pitino and athletic director Tom Jurich were placed on administrative leave and were later fired.[4] Two days later, assistant David Padgett, a former star player under Pitino at Louisville, was named as acting head coach.[5] On February 20, 2018, the NCAA vacated the 2013 NCAA title.[6] On March 27, 2018, it was announced that the University of Louisville signed Chris Mack to a seven-year contract as head coach.[7]

History[edit]

See also: List of Louisville Cardinals men's basketball seasons

"Peck" Hickman era (1944–1967)[edit]

Bernard "Peck" Hickman's 1944 team finished with a 16–3 record and started a string of 46 consecutive winning seasons, which was an NCAA record.[8]

Men's basketball team, 1914, CN Caldwell, captain
U of L winning percentage by year
U of L all-time wins/losses graph

Hickman led Louisville to its first championship on a national level by winning the NAIB Tournament in 1948.[9] In 1956, led by All-American Charlie Tyra, the Cardinals won the NIT Championship.[10] In 1956 his team was placed on two years probation, to include bans on postseason play, by the NCAA due to recruiting violations.[11] In 1959, Louisville made its first NCAA Final Four appearance behind uofl basketball uniforms play of All-American Don Goldstein.

The Cardinals never had a losing season in Hickman's 23 seasons as head coach.[12] He coached 11 20-win teams, appeared in five NCAA tournaments, coached six NIT appearances and finished with a 443–183 overall record, a .708 winning percentage that ranks him in the top 45 all time.

John Dromo (1967–1971)[edit]

John Dromo was Hickman's assistant for 17 years and succeeded rapid fire hockey at head coach in 1967. In four seasons as uofl basketball uniforms coach, Dromo led the Cardinals to a 68–23 record (.747 winning percentage) and the 1967 Missouri Valley Conference title.

A heart attack during the 1970–71 season forced Dromo to retire. His assistant, Howard Stacey, was named interim head coach for the final 20 games of the season.[13]

Denny Crum era (1971–2001)[edit]

Denny Crum was hired as head coach from his alma mater, UCLA, where he was the top assistant coach to John Wooden. It was under the guidance of Crum that Louisville became a college basketball power. In his first season, he guided the Cardinals to the NCAA Final Four, becoming the first coach ever to go to a Final Four in his first season as a head coach. Overall, Crum had six Final Fours with the Cardinals (1972, 1975, uofl basketball uniforms, 1980, 1982, 1983, 1986). He is fifth all-time in Final Four appearances.[14]

The Cardinals won the 1980 Uofl basketball uniforms Tournament championship by defeating UCLA 59–54. Six years later, Louisville would overcome Duke 72–69 for a second title. Crum is one of only 11 coaches to win two or more soccer goal warehouse championships.[15] He was named National Coach of the Year in 1980, 1983 and 1986.

He took the Cardinals to 23 NCAA tournaments, where they had an overall record of 43–21. While in the Metro Conference, the Cardinals won 12 regular season titles and 11 tournament championships. In its 19 years of naming a champion, the Metro had Louisville as first or second place 17 times. In 1993, Crum became the second fastest coach to reach 500 wins.[16]

Crum was inducted into the Naismith Hall of Fame in 1994. He retired in 2001 with a career record of 675–295 (.696 winning percentage) over 30 seasons. He uofl basketball uniforms a member of the College Basketball Hall of Fame's inaugural class in 2006.

Rick Pitino era (2001–2017)[edit]

Rick Pitino was hired in 2001 after four years as head coach of the Boston Celtics, and previously as head coach of Louisville's in-state rival, Kentucky.[17]

Pitino guided the Cardinals to the NCAA Tournament in 12 of 15 seasons, reaching the Elite Eight six times and the Final Four three times (2005, 2012, and 2013). His teams won six conference tournament championships and four regular season titles. The Cardinals won at least 20 games every season since Pitino's first season at Louisville. Through the 2015–16 season, Pitino amassed a record of 391–134 (.745) during his time at Louisville.

Pitino was selected to the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame in 2013,[18] and was under contract through the 2025–26 season.[19]

The University of Louisville self-imposed a postseason ban for the 2015–16 season amid an ongoing NCAA investigation over an escort sex scandal involving recruits between 2010 and 2014. The ban included both the ACC Tournament and the NCAA Tournament.[20][21]

On June 15, 2017, the NCAA charged Rick Pitino for failure to monitor his basketball program which was involved in a sex-for-pay scandal. He was suspended for the first five games of the ACC season in 2017–18.[22]

On September 26, 2017, federal prosecutors in New York announced that the school was under investigation for an alleged "pay for play" scheme involving recruits at Louisville.[23][24] The allegations state that an Adidas executive conspired to pay $100,000 to the family of a top-ranked national recruit to play at Louisville and to represent Adidas when he turned pro.[23][25] The criminal complaint did uofl basketball uniforms name Louisville specifically but appeared to involve the recruitment of Brian Bowen, a late, surprise commit to the school.[26][27] On September 27, 2017, uofl basketball uniforms, Pitino and athletic director Tom Jurich were placed on administrative leave.[4]

On October 26, 2017, Rick Pitino was fired as the head coach of Louisville Men's Basketball.[28]

On February 20, 2018, the NCAA ruled that Louisville must vacate its records person holding a basketball 2011 to 2015. This included 123 wins, the 2013 NCAA title, and a 2012 Final Four appearance.[29]

Chris Mack era (2018–present)[edit]

On March 27, 2018, Xavier head coach Chris Mack agreed to terms on a seven-year contract worth about $4 million annually to become the next head coach at Louisville.[30] Louisville was the first ever school to hire away a head coach whose previous team was a 1 seed in the NCAA tournament. Mack has had a notable start to his Louisville tenure, recruiting a top-5 2019 class that included a 5-star player, four 4-star players, and a three-star player. Picked to finish 11th in the 2018 preseason ACC poll, Mack led the Cardinals to a 20–14 season peaking at #15 in the AP polls and finishing in seventh place in the ACC standings with signature wins over #9 Michigan State, #12 North Carolina, and #11 Virginia Tech and tough losses to #5 Tennessee, Marquette, #22 Florida State, and #2 Duke.[31][32][33]

Notable achievements[edit]

As of the end of the 2015–16 season, uofl basketball uniforms, Louisville had an all-time 1778–892 record in 102 seasons of intercollegiate basketball ranking 10th in all-time victories and seventh in all-time winning percentage among NCAA Division I schools. From 1944 to happy 4th of july softball, Louisville had an NCAA-record 46 straight winning seasons, winning 20 or more games on 31 occasions during that period.

Louisville has made 42 NCAA Tournament appearances (5th all-time) and 15 NIT appearances. The Cardinals have reached the NCAA Tournament 32 of the last 40 years (12 of the last 15, 14 of the last 18 years, 20 do it sports management pvt ltd last 25). Since the NCAA began keeping Sweet Sixteen appearance records in 1975, Louisville's 21 Sweet Sixteens are 5th all-time behind North Carolina (26), Kentucky (25), Duke (24), uofl basketball uniforms, and Kansas (22). The Cardinals have reached the Elite Eight on 14 occasions, including five of the past nine seasons. Louisville is sixth in tournament victories (75) with a 75–41 overall NCAA Tournament record, reaching the Final Four 10 times.

Louisville is the only school in the nation to have claimed the championship of three major national post-season tournaments including the 1948 NAIA championship, the 1956 NIT title and bible bowl 2020 books 19801986 and 2013 NCAA championships. Simultaneously, Louisville is the only school in NCAA history to have a Men's Basketball National Championship dunlop tennis rucksack, along with 2 Final Four appearances.

By the numbers[edit]

  • NCAA vacated all wins from 2011 to 2015

Post-season results[edit]

National championships[edit]

1948 NAIA Tournament Championship[edit]

Main article: 1948 NAIA Division I Men's Basketball Tournament

1956 NIT Championship[edit]

Main article: 1956 National Invitation Tournament

1980 What nationality is gulstan dart Tournament Championship[edit]

Main article: 1979–80 Louisville Cardinals men's basketball team

1986 NCAA Tournament Championship[edit]

Main article: 1985–86 Louisville Cardinals men's basketball team

2013 NCAA Tournament Championship (Vacated)[edit]

Main article: 2012–13 Louisville Cardinals men's basketball team

NCAA Tournament Final Four history[edit]

NCAA Tournament Most Outstanding Player[edit]

NCAA Tournament seeding history[edit]

The NCAA began seeding the tournament with the 1979 edition.

* – Overall number one seed. The committee began ranking 1 seeds in 2004.

Complete NCAA Tournament results[edit]

The Cardinals have appeared in the NCAA Tournament 39* (43) times. Their combined record is 61–44* (76–44).

* – NCAA vacated all wins from 2011 to 2015.

Year Seed Round Opponent Result
1951Sweet SixteenKentuckyL 68–79
1959First Round
Sweet Sixteen
Elite Eight
Final Four
National 3rd Place Game
Eastern Kentucky
Kentucky
Michigan State
West Virginia
Cincinnati
W 77–63
W 76–61
W 88–81
L 79–94
L 85–98
1961First Round
Sweet Sixteen
Regional 3rd Place Game
Ohio
Ohio State
Morehead State
W 76–70
L 55–56
W 83–61
1964First RoundOhioL 69–71 OT
1967Sweet Sixteen
Regional 3rd Place Game
SMU
Kansas
L 81–83
L 68–70
1968Sweet Sixteen
Regional 3rd Place Game
Houston
Kansas State
L 75–91
W 93–63
1972Sweet Sixteen
Elite Eight
Final Four
National 3rd Place Game
Southwest Louisiana
Kansas State
UCLA
North Carolina
W 88–84
W 72–65
L 77–96
L 91–105
1974Sweet Sixteen
Regional 3rd Place Game
Oral Roberts
Creighton
L 93–96
L 71–80
1975First Round
Sweet Sixteen
Elite Eight
Final Four
National 3rd Place Game
Rutgers
Cincinnati
Maryland
UCLA
Syracuse
W 91–78
W 78–63
W 96–82
L 74–75 OT
W 96–88 OT
1977First RoundUCLAL 79–87
1978First Round
Sweet Sixteen
St. John's
DePaul
W 76–68
L 89–90 2OT
1979#3Second Round
Sweet Sixteen
#6 South Alabama
#2 Arkansas
W 69–66
L 62–73
1980#2Second Round
Sweet Sixteen
Elite Eight
Final Four
National Championship
#7 Kansas State
#6 Texas A&M
#1 LSU
#5 Iowa
#8 UCLA
W 71–69 OT
W 66–55 OT
W 86–66
W 80–72
W 59–54
1981#4Second Round#5 ArkansasL 73–74
1982#3Second Round
Sweet Sixteen
Elite Eight
Final Four
#11 Middle Tennessee
#2 Minnesota
#4 UAB
#1 Georgetown
W 81–56
W 67–61
W 75–68
L 46–50
1983#1Second Round
Sweet Sixteen
Elite Eight
Final Four
#8 Tennessee
#4 Arkansas
#3 Kentucky
#1 Houston
W 70–57
W 65–63
W 80–68 OT
L 81–94
1984#5First Round
Second Round
Sweet Sixteen
#12 Morehead State
#4 Tulsa
#1 Kentucky
W 72–59
W 69–67
L 67–72
1986#2First Round
Second Round
Sweet Sixteen
Elite Eight
Final Four
National Championship
#15 Drexel
#7 Bradley
#3 North Carolina
#8 Auburn
#11 LSU
#1 Duke
W 93–73
W 82–68
W 94–79
W 84–76
W 88–77
W 72–69
1988#5First Round
Second Round
Sweet Sixteen
#12 Oregon State
#4 BYU
#1 Oklahoma
W 70–61
W 97–76
L 98–108
1989#4First Round
Second Round
Sweet Sixteen
#13 Arkansas–Little Rock
#5 Arkansas
#1 Illinois
W 76–71
W 93–84
L 69–83
1990#4First Round
Second Round
#13 Idaho
#12 Ball State
W 78–59
L 60–62
1992#8First Round
Second Round
#9 Wake Forest
#1 UCLA
W 81–58
L 69–85
1993#4First Round
Second Round
Sweet Sixteen
#13 Delaware
#5 Oklahoma State
#1 Indiana
W 76–70
W 78–63
L 69–82
1994#3First Round
Second Round
Sweet Sixteen
#14 Boise State
#6 Minnesota
#2 Arizona
W 67–58
W 60–55
L 70–82
1995#11First Round#6 MemphisL 56–77
1996#6First Round
Second Round
Sweet Sixteen
#11 Tulsa
#3 Villanova
#2 Wake Forest
W 82–80 OT
W 68–64
L 59–60
1997#6First Round
Second Round
Sweet Sixteen
Elite Eight
#11 Massachusetts
#3 New Mexico
#10 Texas
#1 North Carolina
W 65–57
W 64–63
W 78–63
L 74–97
1999#10First Round#10 CreightonL 58–62
2000#7First Round#10 GonzagaL 66–77
2003#4First Round
Second Round
#13 Austin Peay
#12 Butler
W 86–64
L 79–71
2004#10First Round#7 XavierL 70–80
2005#4First Round
Second Round
Sweet Sixteen
Elite Eight
Final Four
#13 Louisiana–Lafayette
#5 Georgia Tech
#1 Washington
#7 West Virginia
#1 Illinois
W 68–62
W 76–54
W 93–79
W 93–85 OT
L 57–72 uofl basketball uniforms Round
Second Round
#11 Stanford
#3 Texas A&M
W 78–58
L 69–72
2008#3First Round
Second Round
Sweet Sixteen
Elite Eight
#14 Boise State
#6 Oklahoma
#2 Tennessee
#1 North Carolina
W 79–61
W 78–48
W 79–60
L 73–83
2009#1First Round
Second Round
Sweet Sixteen
Elite Eight
#16 Morehead State
#9 Siena
#12 Arizona
#2 Michigan State
W 74–54
W 79–72
W 103–64
L 52–64
2010#9First Round#8 CaliforniaL 62–77
2011#4Second Round#13 Morehead StateL 61–62
2012*#4Second Round
Third Round
Sweet Sixteen
Elite Eight
Final Four
Davidson
New Mexico
Michigan State
Florida
Kentucky
W 69–62
W 59–56
W 57–44
W 72–68
L 61–69
2013*#1Second Round
Third Round
Sweet Sixteen
Elite Eight
Final Four
National Title
North Carolina A&T
Colorado Uofl basketball uniforms State
Michigan
W 79–48
W 82–56
W 77–69
W 85–63
W 72–68
W 82–76
2014*#4Second Round
Third Round
Sweet Sixteen
#13 Manhattan
#5 Saint Louis
#8 Kentucky
W 71–64
W 66–51
L 69–74
2015*#4Second Round
Third Round
Sweet Sixteen
Elite Eight
#13 UC Irvine
#5 Northern Iowa
#8 NC State
#7 Michigan State
W 57–55
W 66–53
W 75–65
L 70–76 OT
2017#2First Round
Second Round
#15 Jacksonville State
#7 Michigan
W 78–63
L 69–73
2019#7First Round#10 MinnesotaL 76–86

Complete NIT results[edit]

The Cardinals have appeared in the National Invitation Tournament (NIT) 15 times. Their combined record is 16–15. They were the 1956 NIT Champions.

Year Round Opponent Result
1952First RoundWKUL 59–62
1953First Round
Quarterfinals
Georgetown
Manhattan
W 92–79
L 66–79
1954First RoundSt. Francis (NY)L 55–60
1955First Round
Quarterfinals
Manhattan
Duquesne
W 91–86
L 66–74
1956Quarterfinals
Semifinals
Finals
Duquesne
Saint Joseph's
Dayton
W 84–72
W 89–79
W 93–80
1966First RoundBoston CollegeL 90–96
1969First Round
Quarterfinals
Fordham
Boston College
W 73–70
L 83–88
1970First RoundOklahomaL 73–74
1971First RoundProvidenceL 58–64
1973First Round
Quarterfinals
American
Notre Dame
W 97–84
L 71–79
1976QuarterfinalsProvidenceL 67–73
1985First Round
Second Round
Quarterfinals
Semifinals
3rd Place Game
Alcorn State
South Florida
Chattanooga
UCLA
Tennessee
W 77–75
W 68–61
W 71–66
L 66–75
L 84–100
2002First Round
Second Round
Princeton
Temple
W 66–65
L 62–65
2006First Round
Second Round
Quarterfinals
Semifinals
Delaware State
Clemson
Missouri State
South Carolina
W 71–54
W 74–68
W 74–56
L 63–78
2018First Round
Second Round
Quarterfinals
Northern Kentucky
Middle Tennessee
Mississippi State
W 66–58
W 84–68
L 56–79

Regular season conference championships[edit]

The Cardinals have won 23 conference regular 2mm diamond tennis chain championships.

Since the 2014–15 season they have played in the Atlantic Coast Conference. Before that, they belonged to the Kentucky Intercollegiate Athletic Conference from the 1925–26 to 1947–48 seasons, the Ohio Valley Conference for the 1948–49 season, the Missouri Valley Conference from 1964–65 to 1974–75, the Metro Conference from 1975–76 to 1994–95, Conference USA from 1995–96 to 2004–05, the Big East Conference from 2005–06 to 2012–13, and the American Athletic Conference in 2013–14.

They played as an independent school from 1911–12 to 1924–25 and from 1949–50 to 1963–64 (29 total seasons).

Missouri Valley Conference (7)
Metro Conference (12)
  • 1977, 1979, 1980, 1981, 1983, 1984, 1986, 1987, 1988, 1990, 1993, 1994[35]
Conference USA (1)
Big East Conference (2)
American Athletic Conference (1)

Conference tournament championships[edit]

The Cardinal have won 19 conference tournament championships.

Kentucky Intercollegiate Athletic Conference Tournament (2)
Metro Conference Tournament (11)
  • 1978, 1980, 1981, 1983, 1986, 1988, 1989, 1990, 1993, 1994, 1995[35]
Conference USA Tournament (2)
Big East Conference Tournament (3)
  • 2009, 2012 (Vacated), 2013 (Vacated)
American Athletic Tournament (1)

Rivalries[edit]

Kentucky Wildcats[edit]

The Kentucky–Louisville rivalry has been ranked the 2nd best rivalry in college basketball by Bleacher Report and 3rd best rivalry in uofl basketball uniforms of college sports by Basketball Hall of Fame contributor Dick Vitale.[36] Kentucky and Louisville first played against each other in 1913 but stopped playing each other in the 1920s, playing only twelve times between 1913 and 1983. The rivalry was generally dormant with only occasional matchups until the teams met in the 1983 NCAA Tournament. Since then, the two teams have met each year in late December or early January.

Much like the Iron Bowl, the Kentucky–Louisville rivalry is all the more intense because the two schools have consistently been among the nation's elite men's basketball teams for most of the last 50 years. Both schools are also two of the most victorious programs in NCAA men's basketball history; Kentucky is #1 on the list of all-time winningest programs in Division I Men's Basketball and Louisville #26 (#10 including vacated victories). Kentucky has eight national championships while Louisville has two (official)(3 including the vacated 2013 championship) national championships.

Cincinnati Bearcats[edit]

Main article: Cincinnati–Louisville rivalry § Men's Basketball

While predominantly a football rivalry, the proximity and long-standing conference affiliation of Cincinnati and Louisville made this into a key rivalry, particularly in the days of the Metro and Big East conferences. This rivalry went on hiatus in 2014 when Louisville left the American Athletic Conference for the ACC.

Notable Cardinals[edit]

See also: List of University of Louisville people

Retired numbers[edit]

Louisville basketball has honored four former players by retiring their numbers, with a fifth to be officially retired after the 2021–22 season with a ceremony set for January 22, 2022. Except as noted, these are the last players to wear these numbers for a Louisville men's squad:

  • Charlie Tyra #8 – A consensus All-American during the 1956 and 1957 seasons, Charlie Tyra led the University of Country shooting prints to its first NIT title in 1956 and was named the tournament's MVP for his performance. Tyra was named Helms Athletic Foundation All-American in his junior and senior years. One of only five Cardinals to record over 1,000 rebounds in his career, Tyra ranks as the all-time rebounder in U of L history with 1,617. During the 1955–56 season, Tyra pulled down 645 rebounds, a mark that has been bettered by only three other players in NCAA history. He set the Louisville record for most rebounds in a game when he pulled down 38 against Canisius during the 1955–56 season. In his four seasons with Louisville, he helped his teams to a combined record of 88–23 and three straight NIT appearances. Tyra ranks third in career free throws made (448), second in career rebounding average (17.0), fourth in career scoring average (18.2), eighth in career scorers (1,728 points) and eighth in field goals made (640). Tyra is one of only four players in UofL history uofl basketball uniforms score 40 points or more in a game (achieved against Notre Dame when he hit 12 of 16 field goals and all 16 of his free throw attempts). Tyra died on December 29, 2006, at the age of uofl basketball uniforms. He uofl basketball uniforms drafted #2 by in the Uofl basketball uniforms Pistons in the 1957 NBA draft.
  • Wes Unseld #31 – When Wes Unseld ended his career with the University of Louisville following the 1967–68 season, he left as the Cardinals' all-time leading scorer for a three-year player. Today, Unseld ranks 10th on the all-time scoring list, but his career point total of 1,686 is still tops for a three-year player. A consensus All-American during his junior and senior years, Unseld is one of only five other Cardinal players to pull down over 1,000 rebounds in his career. His 1,551 career rebounds ranks second behind Tyra's 1,617. Unseld began his senior season with a 45-point effort against Georgetown College, a UofL record that still stands today. Unseld, chosen as second player overall in the NBA draft by Baltimore, was honored on the All-Missouri Valley Conference team all three years at UofL and the Cardinals were 60–22 during his three seasons. During his junior year, Unseld led the Cardinals to a final No. 2 ranking in both wire service polls. Unseld's 20.6 scoring average still ranks as the top scoring average in Louisville history. His 18.9 rebounding average also ranks as the uofl basketball uniforms average for a Cardinal. While playing on the Cardinals' freshmen team, Unseld averaged 35.8 points and 23.6 rebounds, and hit 68.6 percent from the field.
  • Darrell Griffith #35 – The 1980 Player of the Year and consensus first team All-American led Louisville to four uofl basketball uniforms NCAA tournament appearances, winning the 1980 Championship as he had promised when he committed to his hometown Cardinals. Griffith's career 2333 points and single-season 825 points rank first in Louisville history. He scored in double figures in 41 straight games and 111 of his 126 games with the Cardinals. His play earned him the nickname "Dr, uofl basketball uniforms. Dunkenstein".[37] He was drafted #2 by the Utah Jazz in the 1980 NBA draft.
  • Pervis Ellison #42 – Ellison won the 1986 NCAA Tournament MOP award after leading the Cardinals to their second NCAA Tournament Championship, uofl basketball uniforms. A consensus first team All-American in 1989, he is the only Louisville player to score 2000 points and grab 1000 rebounds in a career. His 374 career rejections rank first at Louisville and ranked Ellison third all time in the NCAA when he left in 1989. He was drafted #1 by the Sacramento Kings in the 1989 NBA draft.
  • Russ Smith #2 – Smith, the Cardinals' all-time steals leader with 275 and also fifth in career scoring with 1,908 points, was a consensus first-team All-American in 2013–14 after receiving third-team All-American honors from the National Association of Basketball Coaches and Sporting News in 2012–13, when the Cardinals won their since-vacated third national title. His number retirement ceremony is set for Louisville's January 22, 2022 home game against Notre Dame. The number is being worn by Sam Bearden in the 2021–22 season, but will not be issued in future seasons.

Cardinals in the Hall of Fame[edit]

Louisville uofl basketball uniforms three representatives in the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame: Cardinal All-American and former Washington Bullets All-Star Wes Unseld, who was inducted in 1988, former coach Denny Crum, who was inducted in 1994, and coach Rick Pitino, uofl basketball uniforms, who was inducted in 2013. Darrell Griffith, a national player of the year and consensus All-American at the University of Louisville, is part of the 2014 induction class for the National Collegiate Basketball Hall of Fame.

National Player of the Year awards[edit]

All-Americans[edit]

Twenty uofl basketball uniforms Louisville players have earned 25 All American selections. 7 players received 8 consensus All-American selections.[38][39]

Consensus selections[edit]

Other selections[edit]

Other major national awards[edit]

Honored jerseys[edit]

Louisville has honored the jerseys of 20 former players. Their numbers remain active.

Conference Player of the Year[edit]

Key[edit]

Co-Players of the Year
Player (X) Denotes the number of times the player has been
awarded the Player of the Year award at that point

Conference Tournament Most Outstanding Player[edit]

1000-point scorers[edit]

As of 2015[update], Louisville has 67 1000-point career scorers, second only to North Carolina for most all time.[40]

Cardinals in the pros[edit]

Ambox current red Asia Australia.svg

This section needs to be updated. Please help update this article to reflect recent events or newly available information.(January 2017)

The Cardinals have had 75 players taken in the NBA Draft, the most recent being Ray Spalding, who was chosen in the 2018 NBA Draft, and Donovan Mitchell, who was chosen in the 2017 NBA Draft. 30 former Cardinal players are playing professional basketball, with six of those currently playing in the NBA.

Louisville Cardinals basketball player Donovan Mitchell
Donovan Mitchell is one of five former Cardinals playing in the NBA in 2020.

Several other uofl basketball uniforms players have played in the NBA, including:

Facilities[edit]

Home courts[edit]

KFC Yum! Center (2010–present)[edit]

Since the 2010–11 season the Cardinals have played their home games at the KFC Yum! Center located along the banks of the Ohio River in downtown Louisville. As of February 7, 2017[update], Louisville has a 114–14 record (.891) in 6 seasons in the KFC Yum! Center.[41][42][failed verification]

The facility has a seating capacity of 22,090 with 71 suites and 62 loge boxes.[43] It is the third-largest in the nation (behind only Syracuse's Carrier Dome, Tennessee's and Rupp Arena). Louisville ranked among the top 3 in attendance in the first three seasons at the KFC Yum! Center.[44] The attendance record of 22,815 was set on March 9, 2013 against #24 Notre Dame.

The playing surface at the KFC Yum! Center is named Denny Crum Court in honor of Hall of Fame coach Denny Crum. The University of Louisville first renamed its home court after Crum in January 2007.[45]

Since the opening of the KFC Yum Center, the University of Louisville has become the most valuable college basketball team in the nation. In 2012 the Cardinals were worth $36.1 million, up nearly 40% from two years earlier, before the Yum Center opened.[46]

Freedom Hall at the Kentucky Fair and Exposition Center

Freedom Hall (1956–2010)[edit]

From 1956 to the completion of the KFC Yum! Center in 2010, the Cardinals played their home games at Freedom Hall. Louisville had a 664–136 record in 54 seasons in Freedom Hall (.83 winning percentage). Freedom Hall has been the site of six NCAA Final Fours, four additional NCAA events and 10 conference tournaments. ESPN College Basketball magazine once uofl basketball uniforms Freedom Hall as the nation's "Best Playing Floor."

Louisville ranked among the top 10 nationally in average home attendance at Freedom Hall for 31 years, including the last 28 in the nation's top five (19,397 in 2009–10, third in the nation). In 2010, a new Freedom Hall attendance record was set when 20,135 fans witnessed the Cardinals defeat the #1 ranked Syracuse Orange in the uofl basketball uniforms University of Louisville game in the arena.[47]

Jefferson County Armory (1945–1972)[edit]

Jefferson County Armory was the primary home of Louisville Cardinals basketball starting in 1945 when Bernard "Peck" Hickman was head coach until the 1957–58 season, when Freedom Hall became their primary home game site. The Cardinals played 10 of their home games in the Jefferson County Armory in 1956–57 and three games in Freedom Hall. Louisville played one game at the armory in 1958–59.In the 1960s the armory was renamed the Louisville Convention Center. The Cardinals played two sony esports at the Convention Center in 1963–64 and three games in the Convention Center in 1964–65. The last game the Cardinals played there was November 30, 1972. Louisville was 153–23 all time at the Jefferson County Armory which is now named the Louisville Gardens.[48][49]

Belknap Gymnasium (1931–1944)[edit]

After playing home games at numerous venues in its early years, the Cardinals moved to the newly constructed Belknap Gymnasium in 1931. The gym housed 600 bleacher seats and the baskets were mounted zenith 100 kayak to the wall. Louisville compiled a 56–35 (.615 winning percentage) before moving to the Jefferson County Armory. The gym was razed in 1993 to make way for Lutz Hall.[50]

Practice facilities[edit]

Planet Fitness-Kueber Center (2007–present)[edit]

Since 2007 the Cardinals have practiced at the $15.2 million, 60,000 square feet (5,600 m2) Planet Fitness-Kueber Center on campus. The Planet Fitness-Kueber Center houses the teams basketball offices, practice facilities, film room and training areas.

The facility was named the Yum! Center, until December 2018 when local businessmen Rick and David Kueber donated $3 million to rename the facility.[51]

Controversies and scandals[edit]

1956 recruiting violations[edit]

In 1956 the team was placed on probation for two years by the NCAA, including bans on postseason play, due to recruiting violations.[11]

2015 sex scandal[edit]

Main article: 2015 University of Louisville basketball sex scandal

A former Louisville player, and then Director of Basketball Operations, Andre McGee, arranged and paid for strippers and prostitutes to perform striptease dances and sexual acts for 17 prospective and former basketball players from 2010 to 2014. On October 3, uofl basketball uniforms, 2015, the book publisher IBJ Custom Publishing released a book entitled "Breaking Cardinal Rules." Based on revelations provided by the local self-described escort, Katina Powell, the book detailed striptease dances and acts of prostitution that Powell and McGee arranged and organized in Minardi Hall over approximately a four-year period.[52]

During the investigation of the allegations, the university self-imposed a ban on the 2016 NCAA Tournament. In June 2016, the NCAA announced that the university would lose four basketball scholarships over the course of four seasons, but there would be no further postseason ban. The NCAA suspended head coach Rick Pitino for five ACC games during the 2017–18 season. The NCAA also ordered the university to vacate all wins from 2011 to 2014 that include ineligible players. The vacated wins include a Final Four appearance in 2012 and an NCAA Tournament Championship in 2013.[53] Luke Hancock's 2013 Final Four Most Valuable Player Award was reinstated by the NCAA because he was found to be innocent of any NCAA rule violations.

2017–18 corruption scandal[edit]

Main article: 2017–18 NCAA Division I men's basketball corruption scandal

As a result of a corruption scandal implicating various schools including Louisville,[54][55][56] on September 27, 2017, Louisville placed head coach Rick Pitino on unpaid administrative leave and athletic directorTom Jurich on paid administrative leave.[57] Rick Pitino and Tom Jurich would then be fired with cause by the University, David Padgett would be selected to replace Rick Pitino as the Interim Head Coach of the men's squad, and Vince Tyra would be selected as Interim Athletic Director.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^"Louisville Athletics - Louisville Sports Information". March 26, 2015. Retrieved April 19, 2017.
  2. ^"2011 NCAA Men's Final Four Statistics"(PDF). uofl basketball uniforms NCAA Men's Basketball Statistics. National Intercollegiate Athletic Association. Retrieved January 15, 2012.
  3. ^"2015–16 Louisville Basketball Guide"(PDF). University of Louisville. Retrieved February 12, 2016.
  4. ^ ab"Louisville's Pitino and Jurich placed on leave", uofl basketball uniforms. ESPN.com. September 28, 2017. Retrieved September 27, 2017.
  5. ^Medcalf, Myron (September 30, 2017). "David Padgett to take on acting head-coaching duties for Cardinals". ESPN.com. Retrieved March 4, 2018.
  6. ^"Louisville must vacate basketball title, NCAA denies appeal". ESPN.com. January 20, 2018. Retrieved March 4, 2018.
  7. ^"Louisville hires Xavier's Chris Mack as new men's basketball coach". March 27, 2018. Retrieved March 28, 2018.
  8. ^"Louisville Basketball Media Guide". University of Louisville Athletic Department. Retrieved January 15, 2012.
  9. ^"NAIA Division I Men's Basketball"(PDF). NAIA. Archived from the original(PDF) on August 15, 2010. Retrieved December 27, 2011.
  10. ^"NIT Postseason Tournament Results (1950's)". NCAA. Retrieved December 27, 2011.
  11. ^ ab"The Stanford Daily Archives". archives.stanforddaily.com.
  12. ^"Former Hoop Coach/AD Hickman Dies". University of Louisville Athletic Department. Retrieved December 27, 2011.
  13. ^"Louisville Cardinal Head Coaches". University of Louisville. Retrieved January 15, 2012.
  14. ^
Источник: [https://torrent-igruha.org/3551-portal.html]

The Big Ten/ACC Challenge is upon us, albeit a little bit later for the Badgers and Cardinals than the other teams. This year, Wisconsin will face off against Louisville in a match up of red and white. I hope you aren’t color blind, because this one could be rough.

Now, let’s take a look at Louisville’s uniforms, to see if they will be challenging to look at.

As a reminder, we will be rating the opposing threads on a scale of oh honey, no, to YAASS QUEEN.

Oh honey, no: Obviously, this is the worst rating. If I must explain this to you, you’re probably wearing socks with sandals right now, or a brown belt with black pants, either way, oh honey, uofl basketball uniforms, no.

Ewww: Nice try, but no.

Werk it: You brought it.

YAASS QUEEN: Best of the best. Your proverbial milkshake brings all the proverbial boys to the yard.

School: University of Louisville

Mascot: Cardinals

Color Scheme: Black, Red, Yellow and Gray Horse

Official Brand Sponsor: Adidas

Home uniform:

Louisville Courier-Journal-USA TODAY Sports

The Cardinals home uniforms are white, with red and black accents, such as red and black trim around the collar of the uniform and ‘Louisville’ in red across the chest, outlined in black, uofl basketball uniforms, with red numbers outlined in black.

Each player uofl basketball uniforms has the word ‘unity’ on the back of their uniform under their number. A nice touch by the university during these times of racial inequality.

The shorts of the uniform are white as well, with a black waistband with a red line in the middle. On the left leg of the shorts, the Cardinal logo is visible, uofl basketball uniforms, facing backward and on the back of the reg leg ‘The Ville’ is printed in white, with red outlining. The coolest part of the uniform though in my opinion is that the Cardinal logo also appears on the right leg with a muted design.

These home uniforms are solid and I am a fan of the font that Louisville has been using for years on its basketball uniforms. Its certainly more appealing than block lettering that is for sure. I would also like to see some trim on the bottom of the shorts, something that maybe matches the waistband, just for a little more contrast.

That being said, you certainly can’t beat red and white in a uniform.

Uniform score:

Werk it

Away uniform:

The Cardinals road uniforms are red, with black and white accents. ‘Louisville’ is inscribed across the chest of the uniform, just as it is on the home uniform. The numbers and letters are white with black outlines.

From what I can tell from what I can see online, it looks as though the road shorts may not feature ‘The Ville’ on them and also do not appear to have the muted Cardinal logo.

I do like this look as well, but like with the home uniform, I think it could use some more trim on the shorts.

Away uniform score:

Werk it

Alternate Uniform:

Louisville usually has a couple of alternate uniforms that they have worn in the past as well, but I cannot see whether or not they will this season, as the school has only released footage of their new home and away uniforms.

However, Louisville’s alternate threads are usual black, or a different spin on their red uniforms.

I hope that if Louisville does wear alternates at some point this season, I hope it isn’t just a black version of their current home and away uniforms.

Adidas has a penchant for releasing special uniforms for the NCAA Tournament, and for other special events. While Adidas has fallen short with these in the past (for reference, the swim trunk look they saddled Wisconsin and all of their other schools with in the NCAA Tournament in 2015), they have come through in the clutch as they did in 2016 with the special Black HIstory Month uniforms.

And just as a reminder of how awesome Wisconsin’s throwbacks were.

Alternate Uniform Scores:

Werk It

Why Your Mascot Sucks

Louisville Courier-Journal-USA TODAY Sports

The Cardinal became the school nickname way back in 1913, because the Uofl basketball uniforms Cardinal is the state bird of Kentucky.

The school first got a mascot at the request of the school marching band and Dick Dyson was the first student to wear the costume. At that time the costume was made of paper mâché.

‘Louie,’ has gone through a few designs over the years. In the 1980’s it was made of long red fake fur and then in the 1990’s the costume was updated to more closely match the printed logo. He was designed with shoulder pads for a more fit and toned appearance.

The most recent update to Louie, occurred in 2016 and is the current mascot we see today. The update was made to give Louie a more trim figure and a wider smile. The athletic department’s marketing staff headed up the redesign, with the objective of having better line of vision, more flexibility and mobility for the Bird while keeping its iconic look.

If you know anything about me, you uofl basketball uniforms that I hate it when schools with bird nicknames, give their mascots teeth. BIRDS DO NOT HAVE TEETH! Louie is another example of this and he has had them for a while, dating back to the nightmare fuel of a mascot that was the design in the 1980’s (Second from left, above).

That thing has the smile of a sociopath, who wants to reassure you that it won’t kill you, but deep down.you know they’re going to kill you.

Teeth aside, I do prefer the newest design of the Cardinal to the last version. The beak of the previous model makes it look like it is having an allergic reaction to something.

The new design looks more athletic and is more in avoca football club with the school logo, uofl basketball uniforms, so I will give them uofl basketball uniforms for that. With the more athletic and slim design, uofl basketball uniforms, it does allow for the mascot to do more while entertaining the crowd.

However, I think the biggest improvement in the Louie design is that the newest version wears clothes. There is just something about a naked mascot that is just unsettling to me.

Источник: [https://torrent-igruha.org/3551-portal.html]

Louisville basketball unveils 2020 postseason uniforms

Look, you guys are welcome to form your own thoughts on this, but I’m going to share mine before I even post the video: They’re too normal, uofl basketball uniforms. They’re way, way too normal.

Judge for yourself:

It’s pretty straightforward ., uofl basketball uniforms.

Infra-Reds in 2012 = Final Four

Sleeved Camo Jerseys in 2013 = National Championship

Normal looking uniforms from 2014-19 = No Final Fours

If we wore trash bags from day one through uofl basketball uniforms first Monday in April, I guarantee we’d go 40-0.

The shorts are a little bit funky, and as a lot of people have already pointed out, the reveal video itself is a little weird, so that’s at least something. But still, this could be so much worse, which for us could make things so much better.

Pretty sure you owe us, Adidas, uofl basketball uniforms. If this postseason doesn’t go swimmingly, uofl basketball uniforms, twelve months from now we want straight garbage. Like, literal garbage. Literal garbage with numbers on the back. Those are the uniforms.

Make this right.

Источник: [https://torrent-igruha.org/3551-portal.html]

The Louisville men’s basketball program will wear 1985-86 throwback uniforms during its Louisville Live tipoff event at Churchill Downs on Saturday evening. 

The annual preseason event, which has been dubbed “Downs After Dark: Horses and Hoops,” will be staged amid an evening of thoroughbred horse racing. Members of the 1986 national championship team will be in attendance, signing autographs as the current Cardinals take the court.

With that, Louisville will wear uniforms that are reminiscent of what that team wore, with a black wordmark and numbers outlined in red on a white jersey. There’s also a traditional striping pattern on the collar, waistband and bottom of the shorts, as well as a the Cardinals’ “Dunking Bird” logo on the sides.

Louisville has worn similar throwback uniforms in the past, including against Duke in 2015 and Syracuse in 2018. 

The Cardinals won their second national title in 1985-86, knocking off the Blue Devils, 72-69, at Reunion Arena in Dallas. Last season marked the 35th anniversary of the run to the title, but the program was unable to hold an on-court celebration due to lynn university soccer camp pandemic.

As for the event, a portable court will be place on the plaza inside Gate 1 at Churchill Downs. Gates open at 5 p.m., the first horse race starts at 6 p.m. and the basketball festivities begin at 7:15 p.m.

Photo courtesy of @Bigticket_sc on Twitter.

Источник: [https://torrent-igruha.org/3551-portal.html]

 

“Louisville Uofl basketball uniforms is just a little over a week away. Today, the Louisville Men’s Basketball Twitter account tweeted out photos of an exclusive uniform just for the event.

The jersey is black in the front with a red rectangle in the middle that encompasses the white winter hooked rugs and numbers. The lettering says, “Louisville.” It appears that the red rectangle is either velvet or has some kind of sheen to it. The front also bears an ACC patch and a red Adidas logo. The back of the jersey has the same red rectangle. It also has a “Louisville Live” patch right beneath the neckline and a high top basketball shoes 2017 cardinal head just to the left both above the red rectangle.

The shorts are red in the front and likely back while black along the sides. Along the side of the waistband, “THE VILLE” is written in big block letters and there are black and red stripes on the band as well. There is a red, old English L in the black area of the shorts along the left thigh. On the right thigh is a red Cardinal head.

So, a team with legitimate Final Four aspirations, a bunch of highly touted recruits, hundreds and hundreds of Louisville fans, and these sweet new and exclusive uniforms make this year’s “Louisville Live” a must see event for Louisville fans. “Louisville Live” is set for Friday, September 27th.

Like this:

LikeLoading.

Источник: [https://torrent-igruha.org/3551-portal.html]

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