300 win mag long range shooting

300 win mag long range shooting

300 Winchester Magnum Rifles · Browning X-Bolt Hells Canyon Long Range Burnt Bronze Cerakote Bolt Action Rifle - 300 Winchester Magnum · Weatherby Vanguard. As a hunting cartridge the.300 Winchester Magnum remains immensely Loaded with frangible long range bullets, the.300 Winchester Magnum is truly. For shooting elk or similar sized critters a 160 to 180 grain bullet is just about ideal. A popular long range load for the 300 Win Mag near.

300 win mag long range shooting - advise you

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Without a doubt, two of the most popular cartridges for big game hunting are the .300 Winchester Magnum (.300 Win Mag) and the .308 (7.62 NATO). 

Both are known for stopping power, range, accuracy, and ease of use. 

Both rounds share a lot in common, but their differences put them worlds apart. 

To break down these two rounds, it needs to be clear that both fill different roles. One is not necessarily better than the other. However, hunters/shooters want to make sure that you use the right tool for the right job. 

This comparison between the two rounds should serve as a great way for the end-user to decide what round might work best for them.

Contents

.308

.308

The .308 came into being in 1952 when the Nations that made up NATO (North Atlantic Treaty Organization) decided on a standardized round for the military. 

Winchester saw an opportunity to market this for civilian use, and it has since become the most popular short-action, big-game hunting cartridge in the world.

Hunters, target shooters, military snipers, long-range shooters, and combat shooters worldwide turn to the versatile .308 for its availability and history.

The .308 was developed after the .30-06 used by the United States Military since just before World War One. The .308 has a little more drop in range when compared to the .30-06; this is due to the round being shorter and packing in less powder. 

The parabolic arch produced by the .308 gets pretty significant at ranges beyond 300 yards. At a 100 yard zero, the shooter will need to hold off about 2 inches above the target to hit center bull at 200 yards. At 300, the shooter is required to hold off of nearly 15 inches (depending on bullet grain size).

Most hunters zero their rifle at 200 to help mitigate the hold off needed for longer range shots.

Having less powder does create a benefit, lower and more manageable recoil. This allows shooters of the .308 to re-acquire targets faster while having more comfort from reducing the rifle bucking in the shoulder. Less recoil also helps with your optics; some lower-end optics will start to lose their zero due to recoil.

This is why it’s crucial to invest in good glass, especially when dealing with hotter loads.

The popularity of the .308 is largely due to its availability. Since armies around the world adopted the round, factories cranked out millions of rounds in .308.

With the ammo being in somewhat abundant numbers, the cost of the round is pretty low. Decent quality but economically valued hunting rounds up to match grade quality rounds are pretty easily found in most local stores. 

It is popular because it works, stopping the big game in their tracks with a single well placed shot.

.300 Winchester Magnum (.300 Win Mag) 

Magnum rounds have been around for rifles as early as 1913 with the .30 Newton. 

The desire for more power, a flatter parabolic arch, and faster velocities in the world of sport shooting resulted in a series of magnum rounds developed. 

In 1925 we saw the .300 H&H Magnum; in the 1940s, we see the .270 Weatherby Magnum and .300 Weatherby Magnum. 

Winchester decided to throw their hat in the ring in the late 1950s with several magnum rounds, including the .338 Winchester Magnum and the .458 Winchester Magnum. 

It was not until 1963 did the .300 Winchester Magnum come to pass and lived to become the most wildly available Magnum Round. The others still exist, but the ammo is a lot more expensive and harder to find.

The .300 Win Mag is one of the most popular long-range rounds on the civilian market. The round itself is the exact size and diameter of the .308. 

However, behind it is a much larger brass casing filled with far more powder.

This creates a much faster muzzle velocity, which translates down range to a much lower parabolic arch at ranges further than 300 yards. 

With a 100 yard zero, the .300 Win Mag will have the same 2-inch drop at 200 yards that the .308 has, but at 300, the drop is only a mere 9 inches. 

For a hunting round, this gives you a lot of room for error at longer range shots. With a properly dialed in scope, it is not uncommon for hunters/shooters to reach out well beyond 800yards.

In fact, the .300 Win Mag round is used by many competition long-range shooters extending out to 1,000 yards.

Having all that power comes with the side effect of a lot more recoil. This round was designed for maximum power and accuracy combined into one package. The idea being you make that first shot count, and at any range, you will have no doubt that your target will be down. 

Elk hunters in Montana prefer this round as most shots on Elk are taken at ranges 300+ over rugged terrain, not a place you want to chase a wounded animal for any period of time.

Now, this round comes at a higher price point than the .308. However, as far as magnum rounds go, this one is popular. This means the markets are not without a supply, and generally, the prices are a lot more affordable than the multitude of other magnum rounds. 

So if you want to do a lot of long-range shooting and enjoy a good performing round, the .300 Win Mag brings a lot to the table but won’t cripple your wallet.

.308 vs .300 Win Mag

308 vs 300 win mag

The .308 is a great round, used the world over as a sporting and hunting cartridge. With a lot of practice and good glass, a .308 rifle can reach out as far as the .300 Win Mag, but with a lot less energy and a lot more hold-off. 

The 300 Win Mag will have a lot more recoil but will be able to reach out to longer ranges with a lot more ease.

Since the .300 Win Mag is a lot hotter of a round you will want to consider barrel life. With the .308, the barrel life is considerably longer, meaning it will last a lot longer than the .300 Win Mag due to the lower power and velocity. 

As the round passed down the barrel, the rifling is stressed a lot more with the much hotter .300 Win Mag round.

The .308 round is less costly to manufacture and is abundant all around the world. So the cost is a lot lower than the .300 Win Mag. That said, the .300 Win Mag won the popularity contest of the Magnum rounds, so it’s not as scarce or costly as other Magnum rounds.

So while it does hit the wallet harder than the .308, it’s not as bad as other options on the market.

When shopping for what works best for you, consider what you want the rifle to do. 

Both are adequate big game rounds and have a home in the long-range shooting community. To say one is better than the other would be dishonest. 

They are different rounds designed for different applications. At the end of the day, pick what works the best for what you need it for.

Personal Experience

I have hunted with and shot targets with both rounds, and enjoy both rounds immensely. I tend to carry my .308 a lot more out in the field than a .300 Win Mag. This is purely an economical choice more than anything. 

You cannot go wrong with either, and I recommend having both in your inventory.

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C. Top 5 .300 Win Mag Rifles

1. Winchester Model 70 Super Grade

The first rifle on our list of best .300 Win Mag rifles is the Model 70 Super Grade from Winchester. This bolt action rifle is extremely sleek looking, with classic walnut styling with an ebony forearm tip.

The barrel has a polished blue finish, and the wood parts have a satin finish. The two-tone walnut is very aesthetically pleasing. The weapon has a 26 inch barrel, weighs 8.5 pounds, and has a 3 round magazine capacity.

The pros of this weapon are the looks, the accuracy, and the reliability. The accuracy of the weapon comes from a few things. First, the hammer forged barrel is free floated. Second, the MOA trigger system allows for a very precise trigger pull.

Third, the steel receiver has an integral recoil lug that is bedded in the front and rear to prevent the bolt from shifting at all. Last, the stock has a solid steel piece for added rigidness. All of these factors increase the accuracy of the weapon. The reliability comes from the steel receiver and the controlled round feeding and extracting mechanisms.

The cons of this weapon are the price, limited magazine capacity, and the weight. This is not the most expensive on our list, but it is still pricy. However, it is also the highest quality weapon on the list.

It is also a very heavy weapon, which is something to consider if you are looking for a hunting rifle. As far as uses go, it would excel in any role, but the weight and longer barrel may limit its uses to target shooting and hunts where you don’t have to travel far.

Suggested Retail Price: $1599

Top Features:

  1. As mentioned before, multiple factors add into the accuracy.
  2. Steel receiver, controlled round feeding and extracting.
  3. Pre drilled and tapped for scope mounts.
  4. Sleek looking.
  5. High quality weapon at a reasonable price.

2. Weatherby Mark V Ultra Lightweight

Next up is another bolt action rifle. The Mark V Ultra Lightweight variant is one of Weatherby’s best rifles. As with all Weatherby weapons, this rifle is extremely high quality and very accurate. The barrel is 24 inches long, the weapon weighs 6.75 pounds, and has a 3 round magazine capacity.

Due to the extreme light weight and accuracy, this is the best .300 Win Mag rifle for hunting. If you are looking for a precision rifle, we highly recommend checking out some of the other variants of the Mark V or some other weapons made by Weatherby, although the Ultra Lightweight is accurate enough to work in this capacity.

The pros of this weapon are the accuracy, light weight, and the smooth action. The accuracy comes from the hand lapped barrel and the excellent LXX trigger. The LXX trigger is extremely precisely made, and offers a wider face for more contact between your finger and the trigger.

The trigger is also completely adjustable, all the way down to 2.5 pounds. The LXX trigger goes a long way in increasing the accuracy of the firearm as a whole. The light weight comes from the lighter 6 lug action, composite stock, and a slightly smaller forearm.

The cons of this weapon are the smaller grip, limited magazine capacity, and the price. The smaller grip helps a lot in decreasing the weight, but takes a little getting used to. While this is one of the highest quality rifles on our list, it is also the most expensive.

Suggested Retail Price: $1999

Top Features:

  1. Weatherby guarantees .99 inch groups at 100 yards when using their ammunition.
  2. LXX trigger. Increases the accuracy, but is also an excellent trigger. One of the best on the market.
  3. Stainless steel barrel and composite stock will be resistant to the elements.
  4. Extremely strong action.

3. Browning X-Bolt Stainless Stalker

The Stainless Stalker is one of the variants of Browning’s X-Bolt rifle. They are all high quality firearms, but the Stainless Stalker has some added features that make it an excellent option as a hunting rifle.

The rifle has a 26 inch barrel, weighs just under 7 pounds, and has a 3 round magazine capacity. While other variants of the X-Bolt may function better in other roles, the Stainless Stalker is another one of the best .300 Win Mag rifles for hunting.

The pros of this weapon are the durability, adjustable trigger, short throw bolt, and reliability. The durability comes from the stainless steel barrel, bolt, and receiver paired with a composite stock coated in Dura-Touch Armor Coating.

This makes the weapon extremely resistant to the elements. Additional grip has been added to the forearm in order to allow for plenty of grip strength in adverse conditions. The adjustable trigger makes the weapon slightly more accurate, and the short throw bolt allows you to chamber the next round and fire quicker.

The cons of this weapon are that it is not as accurate as some of the others and has a limited magazine capacity. However, this is an excellent rifle for hunting.

Suggested Retail Price: $1099

Top Features:

  1. Stainless steel parts and composite stock.
  2. Adjustable trigger.
  3. Pre drilled and tapped for scope mounts.
  4. Light weight. Not as light as the Mark V Ultra Lightweight, but still a manageable weight.
  5. Comfortable pad that absorbs recoil well.
  6. Stainless steel parts increase the reliability significantly.

4. Savage Arms 110BA Stealth Evolution

While Savage Arms is generally known for their affordably priced bolt action rifles, the 110BA Stealth Evolution is cut from a different cloth.

This is still a reliable bolt action rifle, but has been given a modern, tactical look. It has an AR-15 style handguard with multiple picatinny rails to go along with a fully adjustable stock.

It also has a detachable box magazine that has a 5 round capacity. It has a 24 inch barrel and weighs around 7 pounds. With a little work, this could function well as a precision rifle. In our opinion, it is the best .300 Win Mag rifle for target shooting. It could be used for hunting, but there are better options out there.

The pros of this weapon are the picatinny rails, adjustable trigger, a manageable weight, and the modernized look. The picatinny rails allow you to mount any number of accessories on the rifle.

It also allows you to use a wider variety of scopes and optics. Savage Arms’ AccuTrigger is fully adjustable, and greatly increases the accuracy of the rifle. Adjusting the trigger pull will go a long way in increasing your shot.

The look of this weapon is nice, but some of the features that come along with it are even nicer. For example, the adjustable stock, pistol style grip, and the detachable box magazine look nice, but also add a lot to the weapon.

The pros of this weapon are limited to mostly the cost. As mentioned, this is a good frame to start off, but to make a competitive rifle, it may take a little work. As far as the cost, this is a quality rifle, but given the reputation of Savage Arms, some people will struggle to pay this for one of their rifles.

Suggested Retail Price: $1099

Top Features:

  1. Increased magazine capacity. Dependent on your use for the weapon, this may be a nice feature for you.
  2. Modern look and features that go along with it.
  3. Increases the accuracy of the weapon.
  4. Reliable and smooth action.

5.Thompson/Center Compass

The last entry on our list of best .300 Win Mag rifles is the Compass from Thompson/Center. While this is an extremely affordably priced and basic rifle, there are also some great features to see at this price point.

The rifle has a 24 inch barrel, weighs 7.5 pounds, and has a 4 round magazine capacity. Due to some of the added features, this is the best .300 Win Mag rifle for the price. It would function well as a hunting rifle, but could also be the starting point for an entry level precision rifle.

The pros of this weapon are the short pull, increased magazine capacity, adjustable trigger, and the perice. This weapon actually has one of the shortest pulls on our list, which is surprising in such an affordably priced weapon.

Another surprise for an affordably priced weapon is the adjustable trigger. Usually this comes at an added cost. Having the extra round that most of the other rifles don’t have is another plus.

The cons of this weapon are hard to complain about considering the price. However, this wasn’t the most accurate rifle on the list, and is one of the heavier ones.

Suggested Retail Price: $350

Top Features:

  1. Hard to beat this price, especially given some of the added features.
  2. Adjustable trigger. You usually don’t see an adjustable trigger at this price.
  3. Grip and stock. The composite grip and stock offer plenty of grip strength and are resistant to the elements.
  4. As with most bolt actions, this weapon is smooth and reliable, shot after shot.

Conclusion
As you can see, there are a plethora of options available for .300 Win Mag rifles. While there are many factors to consider, thinking about your use for the weapon will help you narrow down which features are important to you. Once you’ve identified that, the list of best rifles for you will start to shrink.

If you’re looking for a hunting rifle, the Weatherby Mark V Ultra Lightweight is an excellent option. If you’re looking for an overall excellent quality weapon, the Winchester Model 70 Super Grade is definitely something to look into.

However, if you are on a tighter budget, the Thompson/Center Compass is probably what you’re going to want. No matter which weapon you choose, .300 Win Mag is an excellent cartridge, and you will likely be happy with your purchase. Hopefully our list of best .300 Win Mag rifles has helped narrow down your search for you.

Tobias

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300 Winchester Magnum

The 300 Winchester Magnum is a long action belted magnum introduced in 1963 by Winchester Repeating Arms. It is a necked down, shortened, and slightly blown out cartridge based on the parent 375 H&H.  The 300 Win Mag has always been considered one of the great hunting cartridges, and with the current selection of bullets, better suited for long-range shooting, it has come into its own. We have included a SAAMI chamber drawing in this cartridge guide. Although the 300 Win Mag can benefit slightly from a custom chamber it does very well in SAAMI form. For most of its existence, it has been stuck with mediocre long-range bullets however this cartridge guide is going to focus on long-range hunting and shooting loads. It will focus on bullets from 200-230 grains and the powders most appropriate for them. Lighter bullets are not ideal for long-range hunting in a 30 caliber. Although heavier bullets can be used we feel they are better suited in larger capacity cartridges.

DISCLAIMER: This is a guide. Everything listed within is for information purposes only. All loads should be worked up carefully. We have seen loads require as much as two grains of charge weight adjustment from one powder lot to another. We have seen as much as five grains of powder adjustment required between different brands of brass. Failure to start low could result in damaged equipment or injury. USE AT YOUR OWN RISK.

300 Winchester Magnum Cartridge Case

First, let’s discuss the case itself. Many opponents of the cartridge will want to discuss the belt as being a hindrance but in real-world use, it is of little concern. If you treat the cartridge like any other and ignore the belt you will never even know it exists other than cosmetically. We are advocates of letting cases growing during the first few firings to the point where the bolt closure force gets noticeably more difficult to close and then set our dies up for a .002” shoulder bump. If you do this with the 300WM it will behave like every non-belted cartridge. In our opinion, this takes care of one of the so-called issues with the cartridge.

 

The second issue is the SAAMI spec overall cartridge length. With a SAAMI spec of 3.4” overall length, it is a worthy concern. For long-range hunting and shooting, we typically don’t use factory ammo and this guide is for reloading so we are going to consider this a moot point. As discussed above we have found the SAAMI chamber itself to be satisfactory for reloading. With bullets like the 215 and 230 Berger, the chamber has plenty of room to avoid using precious case capacity when the bullets are seated at or near the lands. While the SAAMI spec chamber is sufficient for the shorter bearing surface bullets like the two Bergers mentioned it does not have the freebore required to get the full use of the case with longer bearing surface bullets like the ELDs. We would recommend anywhere from .200” to .250” depending on the bullet.

Case Capacities

With those two issues out of the way, let’s get on with the guide. The case capacities are included in the image below.  Depending on the brand capacity will be between 89 and 95 grains of water to the top of the neck. We like to use this number, as “usable” capacity is arbitrary. This puts the 300WM roughly 6-12 grains above the 300WSM, equal to or slightly less than the 300 PRC, and 2-13 grains below the 30 Nosler depending on brass brands.

Our Go-To Load Recipes

Now let’s talk about loads that have worked well for us. First and foremost is H1000 with a 215 Berger. This load shoots very well in almost every rifle, from factory rifles to customs. Pick your favorite magnum primer, start at 73 grains of H1000 with a Berger seated at the lands and work up to pressure. You will usually find pressure between 76 and 79 grains. Case capacity and power lots can and do have a huge effect on this as mentioned above. Take the most accurate charge and do seating depth testing. In our experience, they usually prefer from at the lands to .040” off. Some have had great luck farther from the lands.

As far as actual load development methods we have a couple of great videos on our YouTube channel.

Our Favorite Berger Bullets

The 215 Berger has proven to be a very effective hunting bullet and performs very well near and far. This is a favorite combination of mine as well as many forum members. Next, we will mention the 210 Berger HVLD. For load development with the 210 HVLD, you can just do the same as the 215 Berger. This is another great combination but as you can see in the chart below it most likely will not have the same ballistic performance. The lower ballistic coefficient and longer bearing surface most likely will not let it outperform the 215 Berger.

The 225 Hornady ELD-M and the Berger 230 hybrid target and Hybrid OTM are great bullet options for those wanting a little larger bullet. These bullets have performed very well on game and are great for shooting steel. We have a couple of loads listed in the loads chart. As with any data, start low and work up. These will keep up with the 215 Berger in drift but will not be as flat shooting.

Let’s Talk Powders

There are many great powders for this case capacity and bullet weight range. Hodgdon’s powders have been great performers for many years. H1000 and Retumbo will be the best powders for the bullet weights we are covering. H4831SC can be great as well for the lighter bullets in that 200-grain range but is getting to be on the fast side.

Alliant powders have always been a favorite of many 300 Win Mag reloaders. Reloder 22 and 25 have been great but their temperature instability makes them unusable for taking ethical long-range shots, at game, in changing conditions. Whereas, Reloder 23 is very temp stable and has a similar burn rate to H4831SC. Reloder 26 is not listed as temperature stable but in my experience has been in many cartridges including those in the case capacity range of the 300 Win Mag.

Vihtavuori has a few great options. N565 will be very similar to H1000 in burn rate and N570 will be very similar to Retumbo. Both N565 and N570 do very well with bullets from 200 grains to 230 grains. They typically yield slightly faster speeds than their Hodgdon counterparts.

Other Bullet Options For The 300 Win Mag

Though we have discussed a few bullets we have the most experience with there are several other great options. Cutting Edge bullets makes three bullets in the weight range we are discussing with the 220, 230, and 240 grain Lazers. These bullets are bore rider, solid copper designs, and will typically yield more velocity over a typical lead core bullet as well as other monolithics. They are designed so that the nose of the bullet will fracture and three petals will radiate from the core causing a wound channel somewhat similar to a typical fragmenting lead core bullet. At the same time, the core of the bullet continues to penetrate deeply into the animal often with an exit many desire.

Other Berger bullets worth discussing are the 200.20x and 205 Elite Hunter. The Elite hunter will perform much like other Berger “hunting” bullets. The 200.20x will perform much like the 215 Hybrid. In use, it will be very difficult to tell the terminal performance apart. They will penetrate a few inches and rapidly expand causing violent and rapid shock to the animal’s vitals.

Hornady Bullets

Hornady bullets worth discussing are the 208 ELD-M, 200 ELD-X, 212 ELD-X, and 220 ELD-X. These bullets will have a very similar terminal performance to the Bergers.

Nosler Bullets

Nosler makes many great bullets but the one we will include in this guide is the 210 grain Long Range Accubond. This bullet is the typical bonded bullet Nosler is known for. This bullet is one of Nosler’s best ballistically performing bullets and still gives the “mushroom” many hunters have come to love.

Barnes Bullets

Last but not least we will talk about the two Barnes bullets that best fit this guide. The 200 and 212-grain LRX long-range hunting bullets give a beautiful flower petal expansion that many Barnes fans have come to love. The one issue we have seen with them is the lack of expansion at lower velocities. Lower velocity limits for expansion are always a consideration but with the inferior ballistic performance of the Barnes, you will need to pay closer attention. There are too many bullets out there to discuss them all but we feel this covers the more popular options.

Primer Options

Any magnum primer will work well with the 300 Win Mag with the most commonly used being the Federal 215 Match and the CCI 250. In use, I can’t say one is a better performer. I usually pick one and do load development with it. If I cannot get the velocity extreme spreads or the accuracy I desire I will swap to the other. I have stopped swapping “just to see” because it rarely gets better in my experience. I feel to see the best results from a primer you need to do a full load workup.

Reloading Dies

Any good set of reloading dies will work but we have come to prefer full-length “S” bushing dies with a micrometer seater. Redding dies have become our preference. Hornady makes a great set of bushing dies with a micrometer seater, often at half the cost. Both have made great consistent ammo. We will have a video on our YouTube channel discussing the different dies and why you might choose one over another.

Rifle Recommendations

For those looking at factory rifles chambered in 300 Win Mag, there are only a few we can recommend due to magazine restrictions of most. Christensen Arms makes many great models chambered in 300 Win Mag and one of them will surely fit your needs. We have shot many different models and all have exceeded expectations. These rifles give custom performance at a fraction of the cost.

Christensen Rifles

Fierce offers multiple models that would suit the needs of most as well. I have shot the Edge models and the Rival. Both are great if in your budget.

Fierce Rifles

Bergara also offers several great rifles with 3.7” magazine boxes, which is what you need to take full advantage of the cartridge.  Stick with a BDL floorplate model and you will have the magazine room.

Bergara Rifles

There are many other great factory rifles however most have short magazine boxes and will not allow most of the bullets we discussed above to be seated where they need to be to allow full use of the case capacity.

Check Out Our Sponsors For Your Rifle

If a custom 300 Win Mag is what you are after there are almost an infinite amount of options. Take a look at our sponsor page. There are a few great rifle builder and gunsmith options. We also have some sponsors that make great components. Whether you are looking for a turnkey custom or you want to collect the parts and have one built our sponsors have you covered.

A Proven Contender

In a day and age when everyone is after the latest and greatest thing, the 300 Win Mag is still more than capable of keeping up with the competition. Not only can it keep up, but it also has several advantages such as almost countless factory ammo options. This may one day get you out of a bind if you happened to have an issue with your ammo and need ammo for a hunt. If you found this guide in preparation for your next rifle the 300 win mag more than deserves your consideration.

Click here to join the conversation on the forum and read member’s input on loads that have worked for them.

Filed Under: Cartridge GuideTagged With: 300 win mag, 300 Winchester Magnum, Cartridge Guide, Loading Data, Long Range Shooting, reloading

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By John McAdams

300 Win Mag vs 7mm Mag

            Most hunters probably agree that the 7mm Remington Magnum and .300 Winchester Magnum are both fantastic choices for hunting a wide variety of big game, including bear. They’re both calibers able to handle the longer range shooting of hunting the big ungulates, but also the big body structure of bruins. However, many people get confused about the pros and cons of the two cartridges.

300 win mag versus 7mm mag for bear gun

The 300 Win Mag on the left, and the 7mm Mag is on the right. They're both flat shooting, hard hitting and very accurate  cartridges for bear.            

In this article, I’m going to detail the history of the cartridges as well as their strengths and weaknesses in order to provide you with the necessary information to decide which you should use in various hunting situations.

            Remington changed the shooting world forever in 1962 when they introduced the Remington Model 700 rifle along with the 7mm Remington Magnum. Using a shortened .375 H&H Magnum case paired with a .284" bullet, the 7mm Remington Magnum offered a significant ballistic improvement over most other popular cartridges of the day like the .30-06 Springfield.

            Additionally, the new 7mm Remington Magnum cartridge fit in a standard length rifle action. This meant it could be used in many of the same rifle models popular among hunters during that time period chambered in cartridges like the .270 Winchester and .30-06 Springfield. With all that in mind, it's not surprising at all that the flat shooting and hard-hitting 7mm Rem Mag quickly caught on with hunters in North America.

            Designers at Winchester during that timeframe could see what direction the wind was blowing and they began work on a .30 caliber magnum cartridge using the case from the .338 Winchester Magnum (itself descended from the .375 H&H) as a model. The company formally introduced the fruits of their labor to the world in 1963 as the .300 Winchester Magnum.

            Like the 7mm Mag, the .300 Win Mag had a significant ballistic advantage over cartridges like the .30-06 and also fit in a standard length rifle action. For those reasons, the .300 Win Mag was also an instant hit with American hunters.

            You can see some of the differences between the .300 Winchester Magnum and 7mm Remington Magnum in the photos. The .300 Win Mag has a slightly greater overall length (3.34" vs 3.29"), but both cartridges are used in standard (instead of magnum) length action rifles. The .300 Winchester Magnum has a slightly longer case length (2.62″ vs 2.5″) as well as a shoulder that sits .156" further forward than the shoulder of the 7mm Rem Mag.         Though they both have the same rim diameter and are very similar in overall length, the .300 Win Mag has a 5-8% advantage in capacity over the 7mm Rem Mag due to its shoulder placement and longer case length.

            As you'd expect from the fact that the two cartridges are very close in overall size, the ballistics of the 7mm Rem Mag and .300 Win Mag are also pretty similar.

            The biggest difference between them is the size and weight of the bullets they fire. The 7mm Remington Magnum uses .284" bullets and the .300 Winchester Magnum uses .308" bullets.

            Everything else being equal, the smaller diameter 7mm bullets have a higher ballistic coefficient and a higher sectional density than the larger diameter bullets of the same weight from the .300 Winchester Magnum. However, the .300 Winchester Magnum generally uses heavier bullets than the 7mm Remington Magnum.

            For instance, the vast majority of 7mm Rem Mag loads shoot bullets in the 139-175 grain range. On the other hand, most .300 Win Mag loads use 150-230 grain bullets. 

            As you can see in the table below comparing 150gr Barnes TTSX and 168gr Nosler AccuBond Long Range loads in 7mm Remington Magnum to 165gr Barnes TTSX and 190gr Nosler AccuBond Long Range loads in .300 Win Mag, the .300 Win Mag has a small edge, but there isn't a gigantic difference in the ballistics of the cartridges.

            The .300 Win Mag has slightly less bullet drop and carries more energy down range. This is due in large part to the fact that the cartridge uses heavier bullets and has more case capacity. However, since the 7mm Mag bullets compared above have a slightly higher ballistic coefficient, the gap in kinetic energy between the two bullets closes slightly at longer ranges.

            The table below shows how a 10mph crosswind impacts those same loads out to 500 yards. As you can see, the Barnes loads have a nearly identical amount of wind drift, but the 7mm Rem Mag has a slight edge over the .300 Win Mag with the AccuBond loads.              For all practical purposes, there isn't a significant difference in the ballistics of the .300 Win Mag and 7mm Rem Mag at typical hunting ranges. They’re flat shooting, hard hitting, and very accurate cartridges.

            That being said, the .300 Win Mag has more recoil than the 7mm Rem Mag. For example, when fired from the exact same rifle, a .300 Win Mag load firing a 165 grain bullet has about 25% more recoil than a 7mm Rem Mag load firing a 150 grain bullet at a similar muzzle velocity.

            The .300 Win Mag and 7mm Rem Mag are both extremely popular magnum cartridges and consistently rank among the best-selling rifle cartridges in the USA each year. For that reason, virtually every ammunition manufacturer of note produces a wide array of high quality factory ammunition in nearly every major bullet model for both cartridges.

            Along with lots of choices for ammunition, there are many great hunting rifles produced by nearly every firearms manufacturer chambered in 7mm Remington Magnum and .300 Winchester Magnum. Additionally, because the cartridges are the same length and have the same rim diameter, rifles of the same model chambered in each cartridge are virtually identical.

300 win mag versus 7mm mag for bear gun

The vast majority of 7mm Mag loads shoot bullets in the 139-175 grain range. Most .300 Win Mag loads use 150-300 grain bullets.       

           

        When using quality bullets and with good shot placement, both the 7mm Rem Mag and .300 Win Mag are excellent for hunting black, brown, and grizzly bear at all practical hunting ranges. However, since they are such flat shooting and hard hitting cartridges, the 7mm Mag and .300 Win Mag really shine in situations where hunters need to take shots out past 200-300 yards.

            The smaller caliber 7mm Remington Magnum is wonderful for smaller and lighter animals. By the same token, the lighter recoil of the cartridge also makes the 7mm Mag a great choice for smaller framed or recoil shy hunters. It’s also ideal for situations where a lightweight rifle is really desirable, like on a backpack or mountain hunt.

            On the other hand, since it shoots heavier and larger diameter bullets, the .300 Win Mag has a clear advantage when hunting larger, tougher, and more dangerous game.

            Don't get me wrong, you can absolutely hunt species like grizzly bear with the 7mm Rem Mag and untold numbers of hunters have successfully used it in that role over the years. There’s also nothing saying the .300 Win Mag isn’t suitable for smaller animals or that it isn’t appropriate for a mountain hunt.

            Like I said earlier, the 7mm Remington Magnum and .300 Winchester Magnum are both quite versatile, but each cartridge is just a better choice for certain applications. The fact that I have to nitpick the strengths and weakness of each cartridge like that really speaks to their overall effectiveness. All that being said, the difference between them isn't as great as it is sometimes made out to be and the animal will never know the difference if your shot is placed correctly.

This article was first published by John McAdams on The Big Game Hunting Blog and is reprinted here with slight modifications for length with his permission. Also, be sure to check out his list of the best gifts for hunters (which, among other things, includes a subscription to Bear Hunting Magazine).

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Trying to decide between the 6.5 Creedmoor and .300 Win Mag cartridges? Here’s what you need to know about them.

While the .300 Winchester Magnum has a long history of use as an extremely hard hitting and effective hunting cartridge, the 6.5 Creedmoor is much newer to the hunting game. Both offer certain advantages to hunters, but there are some significant differences between the 6.5 Creedmoor vs 300 Win Mag cartridges you should be aware of.

Unfortunately, as is the case with many things involving the 6.5 Creedmoor, there’s a lot of misinformation and hype out there regarding the capabilities of these cartridges. Not surprisingly, it’s really easy to get confused when trying to understand their actual strengths and weaknesses.

What do the .300 Winchester Magnum and 6.5 Creedmoor have to offer hunters? Does the 6.5 Creedmoor really live up to the claim made by some that it’s basically the same as the .300 Win Mag, just with less recoil?

In this article, I’m going to do a detailed comparison of the 6.5 Creedmoor vs 300 Win Mag in an effort to answer the above questions and parse out the differences between those cartridges so you can make an informed decision on which one will work best for you.

Before we get started, I have two administrative notes:

Some of the links below are affiliate links. This means I will earn a small commission (at no extra cost to you) if you make a purchase. This helps support the blog and allows me to continue to create free content that’s useful to hunters like yourself. Thanks for your support.

Additionally, I recorded an entire podcast episode on this exact subject. If you’d rather listen than read, click the appropriate link below to listen to this episode on your preferred podcasting service.

Be sure to hit that “Subscribe” button in your podcast player!

6.5 Creedmoor vs 300 Win Mag Podcast

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For quite a few reasons, .300 Win Mag is an extremely popular rifle round. As the name might suggest, it was developed by Winchester.

It was first introduced in the early 1960s. The name might also suggest that it is a magnum cartridge, which is true, as the cartridge was derived from .375 Holland & Holland cartridges.

It is popular in a few different niches. It’s popular for target shooters because it is one of the most accurate cartridges, and can handle long distances extremely well.

It is one of the flattest shooting projectiles available.

The round is popular among hunters because of the excellent combination of long range ability and a larger projectile. Various militaries and law enforcement agencies use it for snipers.

The projectile is .30 inches in diameter, and the projectiles are available from 110-250 grains.

This wide variety of projectile sizes available is another reason that the cartridge is so popular. The cartridge outperforms most of the competition in terms of ballistics.

A. 300 Win Mag Specs

While some of the more modern cartridges have begun to outperform .300 Win Mag, it has retained its popularity because of the number of available weapons and how affordable the ammunition is.

It is also one of the most popular rounds for reloading, due to the number of projectiles and amount of brass available.

Generally speaking it is faster than .308 Winchester, and maintains its velocity over distance better. This results in a high energy projectile that is excellent for hunting medium to large game.

B. How to Choose the Right Rifle

When looking to buy a .300 Win Mag rifle, there are a few factors to keep in mind. They basically boil down to what your uses for the rifle will be. However, to help point you in the right direction, we’ve identified a few key features.

  • How important is accuracy to you? Are you looking for a hunting rifle or a precision long range rifle?
  • Are you planning on taking this rifle on any mountain hikes in search of that trophy kill?
  • Goes along with the weight. Will a long rifle be a burden for you?
  • If you are looking for a precision rifle, you probably need to be prepared to spend more money than on a hunting rifle.
  • How important is the corrosion resistance and resistance to the elements for you?

Looking for a .300 Win Mag rifle can be overwhelming, as there are many options available. We have tried to touch on the best .300 Win Mag rifles across the whole range of available weapons to help give you an idea.

Winchester Model 70 Super Grade

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My New Long Range .300 Win Mag Rifle

Trying to decide between the 6.5 Creedmoor and .300 Win Mag cartridges? Here’s what you need to know about them.

While the .300 Winchester Magnum has a long history of use as an extremely hard hitting and effective hunting cartridge, the 6.5 Creedmoor is much newer to the hunting game. Both offer certain advantages to hunters, but there are some significant differences between the 6.5 Creedmoor vs 300 Win Mag cartridges you should be aware of.

Unfortunately, 300 win mag long range shooting, as is the case with many things involving the 6.5 Creedmoor, there’s a lot of misinformation and hype out there regarding the capabilities of these cartridges. Not surprisingly, it’s really easy to get confused when trying to understand their actual strengths and weaknesses.

What do the .300 Winchester Magnum and 6.5 Creedmoor have to offer hunters? Does the 6.5 Creedmoor really live up to the claim made by some that it’s basically the same as the .300 Win Mag, just with less recoil?

In this article, I’m going to do a detailed comparison of the 6.5 Creedmoor vs 300 Win Mag in an effort to answer the above questions and parse out the differences between those cartridges so you can make an informed decision on which one will work best for you.

Before we get started, I have two administrative notes:

Some of the links below are affiliate links. This means I will earn a small commission (at no extra cost to you) if you make a purchase. This helps support the blog and allows me to continue to create free content that’s useful to hunters like yourself. Thanks for your support.

Additionally, I recorded an entire podcast episode on this exact subject. If you’d rather listen than read, click the appropriate link below to listen to this episode on your preferred podcasting service.

Be sure to hit that “Subscribe” button in your podcast player!

6.5 Creedmoor vs 300 Win Mag Podcast

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C. Top 5 .300 Win Mag Rifles

1. Winchester Model 70 Super Grade

The first rifle on our list of best .300 Win Mag rifles is the Model 70 Super Grade from Winchester. This bolt action rifle is extremely sleek looking, with classic walnut styling with an ebony forearm tip.

The barrel has a polished blue finish, and the wood parts have a satin finish. The two-tone walnut is very aesthetically pleasing. The weapon has a 26 inch barrel, weighs 8.5 pounds, and has a 3 round magazine capacity.

The pros of this weapon are the looks, the accuracy, 300 win mag long range shooting, and the reliability. The accuracy of the weapon comes from a few things. First, the hammer forged barrel is free floated. Second, the MOA trigger system allows for a very precise trigger pull.

Third, the steel receiver has an integral recoil lug that is bedded in the front and 300 win mag long range shooting to prevent the bolt from shifting at all. Last, the stock has a solid steel piece for added rigidness. All of these factors increase the accuracy of the weapon. The reliability comes from the steel receiver and the 300 win mag long range shooting round feeding and extracting mechanisms.

The cons of this weapon are the price, limited magazine capacity, and the weight. This is not the most expensive on our list, but it is still pricy. However, it is also the highest quality weapon on the list.

It is also a very heavy weapon, which is something to consider if you are looking for a hunting rifle. As far as uses go, it would excel in any 300 win mag long range shooting, but the weight and longer barrel may limit its uses to target shooting and hunts where you don’t have to travel far.

Suggested Retail Price: $1599

Top Features:

  1. As mentioned before, multiple factors add into the accuracy.
  2. Steel receiver, controlled round feeding and extracting.
  3. Pre drilled and tapped for scope mounts.
  4. Sleek looking.
  5. High quality weapon at a reasonable price.

2. Weatherby Mark V Ultra Lightweight

Next up is another bolt action rifle. The Mark V Ultra Lightweight variant is one of Weatherby’s best rifles, 300 win mag long range shooting. As with all Weatherby weapons, this rifle is extremely high quality and very accurate. The barrel is 24 inches long, the weapon weighs 6.75 pounds, and has a 3 round magazine capacity.

Due to the extreme light weight and accuracy, this is the best .300 Win Mag rifle for hunting. If you are looking for a precision rifle, we highly recommend checking out some of the other variants of the Mark V or some other weapons made by Weatherby, although the Ultra Lightweight is swim overalls enough to work in this capacity.

The pros of this weapon are the accuracy, light weight, and the smooth action. The accuracy comes from the hand lapped barrel and the excellent LXX trigger. The LXX trigger is extremely precisely made, and offers a wider face for more contact between your finger and the trigger.

The trigger is also completely adjustable, all the way down to 2.5 pounds. The LXX trigger goes a long way in increasing the accuracy of the firearm as a whole. The light weight comes from the lighter 6 lug action, composite stock, and a slightly smaller forearm.

The cons of this weapon are the smaller grip, limited magazine capacity, and the price. The smaller grip helps a lot in decreasing the weight, 300 win mag long range shooting, but takes a little getting used to. While this is one of the highest quality rifles on our list, it is also the most expensive.

Suggested Retail Price: $1999

Top Features:

  1. Weatherby guarantees .99 inch groups at 100 yards when using their ammunition.
  2. LXX trigger. Increases the accuracy, 300 win mag long range shooting, but is also an excellent trigger. One of the best on the market.
  3. Stainless steel barrel and composite stock will be resistant to the elements.
  4. Extremely strong action.

3. Browning X-Bolt Stainless Stalker

The Stainless Stalker is one of the variants of Browning’s X-Bolt rifle. They are all high quality firearms, but the Stainless Stalker has some added features that make it an excellent option as a hunting rifle.

The rifle has a 26 inch barrel, weighs just under 7 pounds, and has a 3 round magazine capacity. While other variants of the X-Bolt may function better in other roles, the Stainless Stalker is another one of the best .300 Win Mag rifles for hunting.

The pros of this weapon are the durability, adjustable trigger, short throw bolt, and reliability. The durability comes from the stainless steel barrel, bolt, and receiver paired with a composite stock coated in Dura-Touch Armor Coating.

This makes the weapon extremely resistant to the elements. Additional grip has been added to the forearm in order to allow for plenty of grip strength in adverse conditions. The adjustable trigger makes the weapon slightly more accurate, and the short throw bolt allows you to chamber the next round and fire quicker.

The cons of this weapon are that it is not as accurate as some of the others and has a limited magazine capacity. However, this is an excellent rifle for hunting.

Suggested Retail Price: $1099

Top Thunder mountain high school girls basketball steel parts and composite stock.

  • Adjustable trigger.
  • Pre drilled and tapped for scope mounts.
  • Light weight. Not as light as the Mark V Ultra Lightweight, but still a manageable weight.
  • Comfortable pad that absorbs recoil well.
  • Stainless steel parts increase the reliability significantly.
  • 4. Savage Arms 110BA Stealth Evolution

    While Savage Arms is generally known for their affordably priced bolt action rifles, the 110BA Stealth Evolution is cut from a different cloth.

    This is still a reliable bolt action rifle, but has been given a modern, tactical look. It has an AR-15 style handguard with multiple picatinny rails to go along with a fully adjustable stock.

    It also has a detachable box magazine that has a 5 round capacity. It has a 24 inch barrel and weighs around 7 pounds. With a little work, this could function well as a precision rifle. In our opinion, it is the best .300 Win Mag rifle for target shooting. It could be used for hunting, but there are better options out there.

    The pros of this weapon are the picatinny rails, adjustable trigger, 300 win mag long range shooting, a manageable weight, and the modernized look. The picatinny rails allow you to mount any number of accessories on the rifle.

    It also allows you to use a wider variety of scopes and optics. Savage Arms’ AccuTrigger is fully adjustable, and greatly increases the accuracy of the rifle. Adjusting the trigger pull will go a long way in increasing your shot.

    The look of this weapon is nice, but some of the features that come along with it are even nicer. For example, the adjustable stock, pistol style grip, and the detachable box magazine look nice, but also add a lot to the weapon.

    The pros of this weapon are limited to mostly the cost. As mentioned, this is a good frame to start off, but to make a competitive rifle, it may take a little work. As far as the cost, this is a quality rifle, but given the reputation of Savage Arms, some people will struggle to pay this for one of their rifles.

    Suggested Retail Price: $1099

    Top Features:

    1. Increased magazine capacity. Dependent on your use for the weapon, this may be a nice feature for you.
    2. Modern look and features 300 win mag long range shooting go along with it.
    3. Increases the accuracy of the weapon.
    4. Reliable and smooth action.

    5.Thompson/Center Compass

    The last entry on our list of best .300 Win Mag rifles is the Compass from Thompson/Center. While this is an extremely affordably priced and basic rifle, there are also some great features to see at this price point.

    The rifle has a 24 inch barrel, weighs 7.5 pounds, and has a 4 round magazine capacity. Due to some of the added features, this is the best .300 Win Mag rifle for the price. It would function well as a hunting rifle, but could also be the starting point for an entry level precision rifle.

    The pros of this weapon are the short pull, increased magazine capacity, adjustable trigger, and the perice. This weapon actually has one of the shortest pulls on our list, which is surprising in such an affordably priced weapon.

    Another surprise for an affordably priced weapon is the adjustable trigger. Usually this comes at an added cost. Having the extra round that most of the other rifles don’t have is another plus.

    The cons of this weapon are hard to complain about considering the price. However, this wasn’t the most accurate rifle on the list, and is one of the heavier ones.

    Suggested Retail Price: $350

    Top Features:

    1. Hard to beat this price, especially given some of the added features.
    2. Adjustable trigger. You usually don’t see an adjustable trigger at this price.
    3. Grip and stock. The composite grip and stock offer plenty of grip strength and are resistant to the elements.
    4. As with most bolt actions, this weapon is smooth and reliable, shot after shot.

    Conclusion
    As you can see, there are a plethora of options available for .300 Win Mag rifles. While there are many factors to consider, thinking about your use for the weapon will help you narrow down which features are important to you. Once you’ve 300 win mag long range shooting that, the list of best rifles for you will start to shrink.

    If you’re looking for a hunting rifle, the Weatherby Mark V Ultra Lightweight is an excellent option. If you’re looking for an overall 300 win mag long range shooting quality weapon, the Winchester Model 70 Super Grade is definitely something to look into.

    However, if you are on a tighter budget, the Thompson/Center Compass is probably what you’re going to want. No matter which weapon you choose. 300 Win Mag is an excellent cartridge, and you will likely be happy with your purchase. Hopefully our list of best .300 Win Mag rifles has helped narrow down your search for you.

    Tobias

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    .300 Win Mag vs 30-06: The Quintessential Long Range Big Game Calibers

    300 win mag vs 30-06As you take your seat next to the crackling campfire at elk camp, you look up as the sparks flutter into the night sky. The evening is brisk, and you are looking forward to the hot coffee that is starting to boil in the blue enamel kettle on the fire.

    Your hunting buddies soon join you after a long day of stalking and regale their tales of the events that transpired. Near misses, huge bull elk sightings, and jokes about who are the worst shooters in the group pass the time as you soak in the atmosphere and scent of the forest that surrounds you.

    As the evening progresses, the discussion turns towards which hunting cartridge is ideal for big game hunting in North America.

    When it comes to long-distance big game hunting, 300 win mag long range shooting, the 30-06 Springfield and 300 Winchester Magnum are ever-present in the discussion around the campfire or internet hunting forums.

    Many claim that the high muzzle velocity, 300 win mag long range shooting, flatter trajectory, and longer effective range make the 300 Win Mag the obvious choice. However, 300 win mag long range shooting contest that the 30-06 is more than sufficient for any large game, and the added recoil and hunting rifle weight of the 300 Win Mag are not needed.

    But which of these 30-caliber cartridges is ideal for your next hunt?

    The Difference Between .30-06 vs .300 Win Mag: Two 30-Caliber Giants

    The 30-06 Springfield and the .300 Win Mag are two extremely capable long-range shooting cartridges that will serve you well when the moment arises. Both hunting cartridges fire the 30 caliber bullets accurately and it’s unlikely that we will be able to determine a winner per se.

    The 300 Winchester Magnum was designed as a long-distance magnum cartridge to fire heavier bullets with extreme precision at a high effective range like that of the 6.5 Creedmoor.

    The 30-06 Springfield was designed as a military cartridge that found amazing success in the realm of big game hunting. With its spectacular terminal ballistics, the 30-06 has claimed every large game animal on the North American continent and has been the hunting rifle chambering of choice for no less than 3 generations.

    Each hunting cartridge has its advantages and disadvantages, and you need to be aware of these when choosing the caliber of your next target shooting or hunting rifle.

    Cartridge Specs

    Both the 300 Win Mag and the 30-06 fire the same diameter bullet, 0.308&rdquo. This means that they can typically fire the same 30 caliber bullets, so it makes reloading simpler for both calibers.

    300 win magv s 30-06 dimension chart

    The first striking difference that you’ll see when comparing the .300 Win Mag and the 30-06 is the difference in case length. The 300 Win Mag is a full 0.12” longer than the 30-06 and you can easily see this when comparing them side by side. However, once loaded, both the 30-06 and the .300 Win Mag will have the same overall case length.

    The overall design of the 300 Win Mag also lends itself to increased case capacity. The .300 Win Mag has over 35% more case capacity than the 30-06, allowing for larger powder charges and higher velocity that lends itself to long-range shooting.

    As far as pressure, the .300 Win Mag is capable of handling over 3,000 psi more pressure than the 30-06. But all of that increased case capacity and powder 300 win mag long range shooting come at a price, recoil, and barrel life.

    Recoil

    There’s no denying that the recoil plays a key part in accuracy, and neither the .300 Win Mag nor the 30-06 is a slouch when it comes to recoil.

    Recoil also plays a part in follow-up shots, as you can get your sights back on target 300 win mag long range shooting with a lower recoiling rifle.

    As I’m sure you have guessed, the 300 Win Mag has higher felt recoil than the 30-06. Assuming a 7 lb rifle for both calibers, the .300 Win Mag has approximately 35 splitter baseball jersey of recoil, while the 30-06 is slapping your shoulder with 23 ft-lbs. That’s a good 12 ft-lbs less recoil for the 30-06, and that’s not nothing.

    However, there is another factor that we need to consider, and that’s rifle weight. Often a .300 Win Mag will garner a larger rifle. Although this might be uncomfortable to backpack through the woods all day, a heavier rifle will reduce the felt recoil a shooter has to endure as the rifle soaks up some of the recoil itself.

    With a rifle weighing 9 lbs, the felt recoil for .300 Win Mag will come down to about 27 ft-lbs of shoulder punishment.

    300 win mag vs 30-06

    Although this is a lot more manageable, you still must carry 300 win mag long range shooting 9-pound rifle through the woods all day, and that can wear on your endurance cruisers yachts 540 sports coupe for sale well. In the end, 300 win mag long range shooting, it’s a trade-off, a heavier rifle recoils less but is more uncomfortable to carry while a lighter rifle will recoil more but be more comfortable to carry through the woods.

    Many hunters will just say you need to “man up” because shooting the more powerful .300 Win Mag is worth it. But is it?

    When shooting at longer ranges, consistency is key. Although the flat shooting trajectory of the 300 Win Mag is more favorable for long-range shots, the added recoil can add a level of difficulty focusing on the fundamentals of shooting, particularly a clean trigger squeeze.

    For younger shooters, there is no question, the 30-06 with less recoil is the obvious choice. For more seasoned hunters and shooters, you need to be honest with yourself about your marksmanship skills and ability to handle the recoil.

    Because a little trigger jerk at 400 yards will send that 220 gr Hornady ELD-X under the belly of that trophy mule deer. Or worse, you wound the poor animal with a shot that misses all the vitals entirely.

    The simple truth is that it is easier to be more accurate with a 30-06 as it has less recoil, and you can practice with it more.

    Barrel Life

    This is another category that favors the 30-06 Springfield as the .300 Win Mag is notoriously hard on barrels. This is due to the larger powder charge that the cavernous case capacity of the 300 Win Mag allows.

    Sure, you can send those 30 caliber bullets screaming out of the barrel at ridiculously high velocity, decidedly higher velocity than the 30-06. But those magnum powder charges are going to accelerate your barrel wear, especially in the throat where the rifling begins.

    Traditional wisdom states that a 30-06 barrel is good for 3,000 to 4,000 rounds while the .300 Win Mag barrel will maintain peak accuracy for 2,500 to 3,000 rounds.

    For most hunters, it is unlikely that they will ever wear out a 300 Winchester Magnum barrel.

    However, for long-range shooting competitors, it is not uncommon to go through a lot of rounds in a practice session. These shooters demand the pinnacle of accuracy from their handloads and barrels, therefore barrel life is much more important for competitive shooters as opposed to hunters.

    Accuracy

    Accuracy is a tricky category to empirically analyze as there are factors that cannot be calculated. The rifle system being used, barrel life, consistency of ammo, the skill of the shooter, and environmental conditions all play a part in accuracy.

    All things being equal, both the .300 Win Mag and the 30-06 are extremely accurate within their effective ranges and sub-MOA accuracy is achievable with match-grade ammo, proper optics, and proper execution of the fundamentals of marksmanship.

    As the .300 Win Mag has a flatter trajectory, this gives it a slight edge in accuracy over the 30-06 as a shooter will need to make fewer adjustments to account for bullet drop.

    300 win mag vs 30-06

    Furthermore, the Army selected the 300 Win Mag as its ammo for their new Enhanced Sniper Rifle in 2010 (though the 6.5 Creedmoor is turning some heads at USSOCOM).

    Effective range also plays a part in accuracy, as once a bullet goes subsonic, accuracy goes out the window.

    The .300 Win Mag is rated out to a maximum effective range of 1,300 yards while the 30-06 starts going subsonic right around the 1,000-yard marker. Under 800 yards, with all things being equal, I doubt many shooters could detect any differences in accuracy. Over 800 yards it will become more apparent as the 30-06 starts to hemorrhage fps quickly and the 300 Win Mag is still trucking along.

    For shots over 800 yards, the 300 Win Mag will be the better option. However, for shots within ethical hunting ranges and below 800 yards, accuracy should be equal for these two hunting cartridges.

    Trajectory

    Trajectory is how we quantify a bullet’s flight path to its target measured in inches of bullet drop.

    For the purpose of discussion, we will look at the 180 grain bullet that both cartridges fire.

    Short-range trajectory for the 300 Win Mag and 30-06 are fairly close, at -18” and -27” respectively. Nine inches is not insignificant, but the difference between these two cartridges really shows when you hit the 1000-yard line.

    At 1,000 yards, the 30-06 has dropped on average -397” while the 300 Win Mag has only dropped -295&rdquo. That’s 8.5 feet difference between the two cartridges.

    This is one of the main reasons that the 30-06 is not used in long-range target shooting competitions and the 300 Win Mag is often seen on the 1,000-yard firing line.

    The .300 Win Mag was specifically designed to be a high velocity, flat shooting round similar to the 6.5 Creedmoor and it excels at this role. There’s no denying that for longer ranges, the .300 Win Mag is the superior choice.

    Effective Range

    This is another category where the .300 Win Mag runs away with the victory.

    As mentioned earlier, the 300 Winchester Magnum can maintain supersonic bullet speeds out to 1,300 yards, with some match grade loads reaching out to 1,400 and even 1,500 yards.

    The 30-06 Springfield will start to go subsonic right around the 1,000-yard line and accuracy will drop off significantly.

    The .300 Win Mag has cornered the market in terms of effective range.

    Ballistic Coefficient

    When I start talking about ballistic coefficient (BC) to my shooting buddies, I often get a “deer in headlights” look.

    In short, the ballistic coefficient for a given bullet is a measure of how well it resists wind and air resistance. It’s a numeric representation of how aerodynamic a bullet is, a high BC is preferred and means the bullet will buck the wind easier.

    300 win mag vs 30-06

    The way a bullet’s ballistic coefficient is calculated is a bit complicated, so we won’t cover that today as I don’t want your eyes to glaze over!

    Generally, a heavier bullet will have a higher BC.

    As the 300 Win Mag and the 30-06 Springfield fire the same bullet diameter, there is not a lot of difference in ballistic coefficients between the two cartridges.

    The .300 Win Mag does pull away a little when you start to factor in the heavier 190+ grain loadings, but it is not a significant difference.

    If we look at this in a hunting context, I doubt that any hunters will be able to detect a difference in wind drift under 300 yards, which is where the majority of shots will occur.

    Therefore, there is not a major difference between these two rounds in terms of ballistic coefficient as most offerings hickory fountain green indoor soccer between the 0.45-0.5 range, 300 win mag long range shooting is an exceptional BC.

    There are a few 30 caliber bullets that break the 0.6 BC, which would be ideal for long-range target shooting for the 300 Win Mag. Those bullets would be the Nosler Trophy Grade 300 win mag long range shooting Long Range 190 gr (0.64 BC) and the Barnes Precision Match OTM 220 gr (0.611 BC).

    Sectional Density

    Sectional Density (SD) is the measure of how well a bullet penetrates a target. This is extremely important when hunting big game, as you need a bullet that can punch through thick hide, bone, and sinew.

    Sectional density is calculated by comparing the bullet weight and the bullet diameter, the higher the number the more effective it will be at penetrating a target. The higher the SD the deeper the bullet will penetrate the target.

    300 win mag vs 30-06

    Just like for ballistic coefficient, there is not much difference between the 30-06 and the .300 Win Mag as they fire the same .308” diameter projectiles, with a slight advantage for the heavier 300 Win Mag loadings.

    Another small advantage is the higher velocity that the 300 Win Mag can achieve with its higher case capacity. This added velocity over the 30-06 Springfield will allow the .300 Win Mag to penetrate just a bit deeper.

    However, both the 30-06 Springfield and the 300 Winchester Magnum will give you devastating penetration that will punch through the toughest bone and sinew on any large game that dares to end up in front of your crosshairs.

    The average sectional density for .300 Win Mag is approximately 0.284 vs 0.26 for the 30-06.

    Hunting

    Now we come to the big question, is the 300 Win Mag or 30-06 better for hunting?

    And I’m going to go out on a limb here and state that the 30-06 Springfield is the ideal hunting round between the two.

    Now, before all my 300 Win Mag shooters get up in arms, let me present my case.

    The biggest selling point on the .300 Win Mag that I read constantly in hunting forums online is that has a flatter fanzy cricket download and longer effective range. And those are both true.

    On those same forums, I see hunters justifying their purchase that they “might need to shoot out to 1,000 yards at some point…”

    I have a question, have any of those forum posters actually practiced 1,000-yard shots?

    I’m not talking about using reduced-sized targets to simulate 1,000 yards at 100 yards, I’m talking about an actual 1,000-yard shot.

    The calculations and skills that are required to make a shot this long require years of practice and specialized training.

    There are a ridiculous number of factors to consider in taking a shot this long: changes in wind direction along the flight path, bullet drop, relative humidity, temperature, the Coriolis Effect, bullet travel time, the curvature of the Earth, even the type of powder you used in your handloads.

    300 win mag vs 30-06

    Oh, and you actually need a shooting range that can accommodate 1,000-yard shots. In my home state of Indiana, there is exactly ONE range that allows shooters to go out to this distance and they have extremely stringent marksmanship requirements that you must meet before you can even set foot on the 1,000-yard range.

    If these forum posters think they can pull off even an 800-yard shot without practicing, well I say, “Good luck to you sir!” Because you’re going to need it!

    The simple fact is this, most hunters do not have the equipment, skills, time, or money to develop the ability to shoot this far. And you know what? That’s OK!

    If you are an ethical hunter (which if you have read this far, I know you are), you should not even be considering taking a shot on any game animal at those distances because the probability that you wound the animal is significantly higher (if you hit them at all).

    An ethical hunter will try to close the distance to a range they are comfortable taking the shot or passing on the animal altogether. Therefore, the internet group reasoning for purchasing a 300 Win Mag because of its ability to shoot out to 1,000 yards is null and void in terms of hunting.

    In my experience, ethical hunting shot distances are 500 yards or less with 300 yards being the average maximum distance most hunters are comfortable with. Shot placement is always the most important thing to 300 win mag long range shooting harvesting an animal, and the closer you are the better your shot placement will be.

    Bearing that in mind, what advantage does the 300 Win Mag offer over the 30-06 Springfield at 300-500 yards? The answer is not much.

    Both hunting cartridges will have more than enough muzzle energy to take down a bull elk (1,000+ ft-lbs) at these distances, which means they are more than enough for Whitetail and Mule Deer as well.

    Therefore, it makes logical sense that the better option is the cartridge that has less recoil (better shot placement), allows for faster follow-up shots, and is generally less expensive.

    Hence my reasoning for selecting the 30-06 Springfield as the superior choice for hunting medium to large game animals across North America.

    Neither cartridge is recommended for varmint hunting as they are simply too much bullet for the job. For something like this, I’d recommend using the cheaper and softer shooting 223 Rem or perhaps a 22-250.

    For deer to black bear, the 30-06 loaded with quality hunting ammo like a Nosler Partition will serve you well.

    300 win mag vs 30-06

    Ammo Price and Availability

    In terms of ammo availability and price, without question, the 30-06 is the superior choice.

    As the 30-06 has been in service for well over 100 years now, the amount of work that has been done on the cartridge is extensive. Advancements in bullet technology and powders have come a long way to make the 30-06 an effective 300 win mag long range shooting game 300 win mag long range shooting cartridge.

    Virtually every ammo manufacturer has an offering in 30-06, but the same cannot be said for .300 Win Mag.

    The 300 Winchester Magnum was not released until 1963, and although it has gained a lot of popularity, not as many ammo options are available for this caliber.

    You still have plenty to choose from, but overall, there are fewer options for .300 Win Mag.

    As for price, cheap full metal jacket (FMJ) ammo can be had for about $1.50/round for 30-06 compared to $2/round for 300 Win Mag.

    That might not sound like a huge difference, but when you start looking at premium hunting ammo from Hornady, Nosler, Barnes, Norma, or Federal, the price jumps up significantly. Premium hunting ammo for 30-06 will run you anywhere between $2-3/round. For .300 Win Mag, you should expect to pay no less than $3 and up per round.

    With 30-06, 300 win mag long range shooting, you can practice with your hunting rifle more which means you will be better prepared when hunting season comes around.

    Rifle Price and Availability

    Rifles for both the 30-06 and 300 Win Mag are not in short 300 win mag long range shooting major rifle manufacturer will have an offering in both cartridges.

    Some popular bolt action rifle options are:

    • Remington 700
    • Savage 110
    • Browning A-Bolt
    • Ruger American
    • Winchester Model 70
    • Tikka T3

    And although you will not lack options in either caliber, there will simply be more in 30-06 as it has been a military caliber. There are many surplus options for 30-06, like the 1903 Springfield and M1 Garand, that are simply not available for 300 Win Mag.

    It was only within the last 12 years that the 300 Win Mag was adopted as a military round, and as such there are no surplus rifles available. And when there are more rifle options available, this means that the price will be lower.

    In general, a rifle chambered in 30-06 will be a little cheaper than one chambered in .300 Win Mag.

    300 win mag vs 30-06

    Reloading

    As the .300 Win Mag and the 30-06 shoot the same .308” diameter bullet, 300 win mag long range shooting, it is nothing short of a reloader’s dream as you can stock up on one bullet type for both calibers.

    Furthermore, if you want to shoot long-range (and have the location to do so), handloading is the best way to tighten up your groups and squeeze every fps of muzzle velocity out of either cartridge (Warning: never load over the maximum charge listed in your reloading manual!)

    The widespread success of the 30-06 (and 308 Winchester) means that you have a wide variety of different bullet weights, bullet profiles, and powders to choose from to create your ideal reload.

    Reloading for both the 30-06 and .300 Win Mag is a breeze and you should not worry about any lack of components or reloading dies as these are both extremely popular cartridges for handloading.

    .300 Win Mag vs .30-06: Ballistics

    Below are the ballistics tables for both .300 Win Mag and .30-06 Springfield comparing multiple popular loadings for each cartridge. Here you can see how each cartridge stacks up against the other, and the differences in the ballistics are impressive.

    The 300 Win Mag has a clear advantage over 300 win mag long range shooting 30-06 in terms of muzzle velocity and muzzle energy as we have alluded to earlier in the article.

    When looking at the lighter bullet options for the .300 Win Mag, you’ll note that the 150 grain 300 Win Mag has a higher muzzle velocity than the 55 grain .223 Rem! (3,400 fps vs 3,200 fps, respectively)

    Generally, the 30-06 Springfield is going to be about 800 fps slower at the muzzle than the 300 Win Mag. The same can also be said for muzzle energy as the .300 Win Mag will have about 500+ more ft-lbs of energy at the muzzle compared to the 30-06. There’s no denying that the 300 Win Mag is a high velocity, hard-hitting round!

    .300 Win Magnum Ballistics

    Note: This information comes from the manufacturer and is for informational purposes only. The actual ballistics obtained with your firearm can vary considerably from the advertised ballistics. Also, ballistics can vary from lot to lot with the same brand and type load.

    300 Win Magnum Bullet WEIGHTMuzzle VELOCITY (fps)Muzzle ENERGY (ft. lbs.)TRAJECTORY (in.)
     Muzzle100 yds.200 yds.300 yds.400 yds.Muzzle100 yds.200 yds.300 yds.400 yds.100 yds.200 yds.300 yds.400 yds.
    150 Grain32902951263623422068360529002314182714242.51.9-3.8-15.8
    150 Grain Superformance340031502914269024773850330428172409204310-5.1-15
    165 Grain31002877266524622269352230332603222118972.52.4-3-16.9
    178 Grain29002760256823752191350930302606223018972.51.4-5-17.6
    178 Grain29602770258824132245346330322647230119921.50-6.7-19.4
    178 Grain Super Match29602770258724122243346230312645229819881.50-6.7-19.4
    180 Grain29602745254023442157350130112578219618592.51.2-5.5-18.5
    180 Grain Superformance31302927273225462366391734242983258922381.30-5.9-17.3
    190 Grain28851691250623272156351130552648228519612.51.2-5.7-19
    200 Grain2825259523762167197035452991250820861742-2.51.6-4.7-17.2
    220 Grain26802448222820201823350829272424199316232.50-9.5-27.5

    .30-06 Springfield Ballistics

    Note: This information comes from the manufacturer and is for informational purposes only. The actual ballistics obtained with your firearm can vary considerably from the advertised ballistics. Also, ballistics can vary from lot to lot with the same brand and type load.

    30-06 Bullet WEIGHTMuzzle VELOCITY (fps)Muzzle ENERGY (ft. lbs.)TRAJECTORY (in.)
     Muzzle100 yds.200 yds.300 yds.400 yds.Muzzle100 yds.200 yds.300 yds.400 yds.100 yds.200 yds.300 yds.400 yds.
    55 Grain4080348529652502208320331483107476453021.9-2.1-11.7
    125 Grain2660233520341757n/a196415131148856n/a0-5.2-18.90
    125 Grain270024122143189116602023161512749937652.30-9.9-29.5
    125 Grain31402780244721381853273621451662127995321-6.2-21
    150 Grain29102617234220831853282022811827144511352.50.8-7.2-23.4
    150 Grain30802848261724172216315927002298194516361.40-6.4-18.9
    165 Grain28002534228320471825287223521909153412202.50.4-8.4-25.5
    168 Grain27102522234621692003273923722045175414972.50.4-8-23.5
    168 Grain M1 Garand27102523234321712006273923742048175815012.30-8.6-24.6
    170 Grain200017401510n/an/a15101145860n/an/a0000
    178 Grain27202511231121211939292424912111177714862.50.4-8.2-24.6
    180 Grain2700246922502042184629132436202316661362-2.50-9.3-27
    180 Grain Superformance28202630244722722104317827642393206317691.80-7.6-21.9
    180 Grain High Energy28802690250023202150331528802495215018451.70-7.2-21
    220 Grain2410213018701632142228372216170813019882.5-1.7-180

    300 Win Mag: Joining the Magnum Lineage – Go Big or Stay Home

    Let’s call a spade a spade my fellow shooters, here in North America we like our Magnum cartridges!

    From Dirty Harry and his .44 Magnum Smith and Wesson handgun to big game hunters in the forests of Northern Canada, many shooters like that extra stopping power that magnum cartridges bring to the table.

    And the 300 Winchester Magnum steps into the Magnum Lineage like any other magnum cartridge on the market…with a deafening BANG!

    Before the 300 Winchester Magnum exploded onto the shooting scene in 1963, there were several other 30-caliber options that we would classify as Magnum ammo by today’s standards.

    The most prominent of these was the 300 H&H Magnum that had been on the market since 1925. However, the 300 H&H Magnum could not fit into a standard action Mauser or Springfield receiver and required a custom Magnum action, which severely handicapped its acceptance in the shooting community.

    The austin white football attempt at a magnum rifle cartridge was attempted by Roy Weatherby with the 270 Weatherby Magnum in 1943 and the 300 Weatherby Magnum in 1944.

    300 Win Mag: Genesis of the Quintessential Big Game Hunting Cartridge

    In 1958, Winchester figured they should probably get in on the magnum craze and introduced 3 new cartridges to their line: the 264 Winchester Magnum, the 338 Winchester Magnum, and the 458 Winchester Magnum.

    Notice any glaring omission from that list? There’s no 30-caliber option!

    Wildcatters (hand loaders who take it upon themselves to develop new cartridges) quickly jumped on this glaring hole in the Winchester line and developed the 30-338 Winchester. Norma Precision also took the opportunity to get in on the action and developed the 308 Norma Magnum in 1960.

    It was at this point that Winchester figured that maybe they might do well by introducing a 30-caliber magnum rifle cartridge offering. And in 1963, Winchester introduced the 300 Win Mag in its long-action Winchester Model 70 bolt action rifle.

    Remington quickly followed suit, introducing a 300 Win Mag offering in its popular Rem 700 bolt action rife. Since then, the 300 Winchester Magnum has quickly become one of the most successful magnum rifle cartridges on the market today.

    The 300 win mag long range shooting Winchester Magnum was developed from the belted 375 H&H Magnum cartridge and sports a whopping case capacity of 91.5 gr of water and a max pressure of 64,000 psi based on SAAMI specifications.

    This voluminous case capacity allows the 300 Win Mag to pack in the powder and push the .308” diameter bullet to its limits.

    At the muzzle, a 150 grain bullet is screaming downrange at about 3300 fps with a when does spring softball start 3600 ft-lbs of energy. That is some serious power! Standard loadings for the 300 Win Mag range between bullet weights of 165 and 220 gr.

    Many shooters believe that the belt around the case head is required to contain the “case-splitting” pressure that the 300 Win Mag must exude. However, this is a common misconception.

    Based on the case design, the belted cartridge is superfluous. However, Winchester retained the design as a marketing strategy to link the cartridge to its heavy-hitting predecessor, the 375 H&H Magnum.

    The strategy was wildly successful as the 300 Winchester Magnum has become one of the most popular magnum cartridges on the market, surpassing the 300 WSM, 7mm Rem Mag, and 270 Weatherby Magnum in popularity.

    A Brief History of the 30-06 Springfield: America’s Beloved Rifle Cartridge

    America’s love affair with 30 caliber rifle rounds began back in the Wild West with the introduction of the 30-30 Winchester. Later, the U.S. Army developed the 30-40 Krag to be its smokeless powder replacement for the .45-70 Government.

    Around 1901, the U.S. Military started developing a new cartridge to replace the 30-40 Krag. The American Expeditionary Forces were very familiar with the effectiveness of the 7mm Mauser cartridge, suffering staggering losses at the hands of the 1893 Mauser at the Battle of Santiago during the Spanish-American War.

    It was clear that the 30-40 Krag was an inferior design compared to the Spanish Mausers and the military did not want to fall behind with advancements in bolt action rifle and cartridge technology.

    At the time, heavier bullet weights were thought to be the superior ballistic choice. Therefore, the initial design submitted in 1903 used 300 win mag long range shooting same 220-grain round-nose bullets fired by the 30-40 Krag.

    300 win mag vs 30-06

    The 30-03 Springfield was patterned after the famous 7x57mm Mauser cartridge, sharing identical case head dimensions.

    However, it didn’t take long for the American generals to take note that multiple European nations were favoring higher velocity, Spitzer (pointed) projectiles in their new bolt action rifles.

    Not wanting to get left behind, the U.S. Military was quick to adopt a similar design. In 1906, the new cartridge that fired a 150-grain Spitzer flat-based bullet was submitted and accepted. The original design for 30-06 Springfield achieved a muzzle velocity of 2,700 fps, packed 2,429 ft-lbs of muzzle energy, and a maximum pressure of 60,200 psi (SAAMI specs).

    And thus the 30-06 Springfield was born, 300 win mag long range shooting. The “30” designates the bullet caliber and the “06” (pronounced: aught six) designates the year of its adoption.

    Although the 30-06 initially gained popularity with the Army’s new bolt action rifle, the 1903 Springfield (which looked surprisingly similar to a Mauser…coincidence I’m sure), it truly became World Famous with the introduction of the semi-auto M1 Garand during World War II.

    The 30-06 Springfield was the ammo carried by our soldiers who fought in the trenches on the Western Front in World War I, stormed the beaches of Normandy in WWII, assaulted the 38th Parallel in Korea, and saw limited use in the jungles of Vietnam.

    Not only has the 30-06 seen massive success on the battlefield, but it has also seen immense commercial success in the civilian market. Big game hunters loved the amazing terminal ballistics and long-range that the 30-06 offered while having a recoil impulse that is not punishing to the shoulder.

    Since its introduction to the civilian market, the 30-06 has been the de facto hunting cartridge that all other hunting caliber cartridges are measured against. The most popular loadings for 30-06 range between 150 and 180 gr bullet weights with the 180 grain bullet being the most popular with big game hunters. However, specialty ammo 300 win mag long range shooting go as low as 110-grain bullets and as high as 220 grain projectiles.

    The 30-06 Springfield is incredibly versatile, allowing hunters to customize their loads depending on the game animals they are stalking. Lighter bullet weights like the 150 and 165 gr Nosler Partition or Accubond can be utilized for whitetail or mule deer, while you should have good luck with the 200 gr Barnes TSX when you have a vital shot lined up on that trophy elk in your crosshairs.

    The 30-06 is truly a rifle cartridge of American legend and has survived the test of time, 300 win mag long range shooting, as it is still one of the most popular hunting rounds in the world over 100 years later. But does the 300 Winchester Magnum simply outclass the tried and true 30-06? Let’s compare these two spectacular long-range cartridges.

    Final Thoughts on .300 Win Mag vs .30-06 Springfield

    The .300 Win Mag was developed to be an incredibly accurate long-range rifle 300 win mag long range shooting capable of shooting past 1,000 yards. And it does this extremely well.

    The 30-06 Springfield was battle-tested on the beaches of Normandy and has proven to be a capable hunting cartridge in the forests across North America.

    On paper, the 300 Win Mag has superior ballistics in terms of muzzle 300 win mag long range shooting, muzzle energy, trajectory, effective range, and ballistic coefficient. However, all these benefits are at the cost of punishing recoil and reduced barrel life.

    But with all these advantages, should you go out and sell the Remington 700 or Browning A-Bolt chambered in 30-06 that you inherited from your grandfather and 300 win mag long range shooting a 300 Win Mag? Absolutely not!

    The 30-06 is a versatile hunting cartridge that has withstood the test of time, claiming every large game animal from the Great Plains to the Rocky Mountains. Less recoil and faster follow-up shots allow the 30-06 to be just as potent as the 300 Win Mag within 500 yards and you should never feel under-gunned when you bring your 30-06 into the woods.

    But if you can take the recoil and you take comfort in knowing you are bringing a high velocity, flat shooting cartridge to bear on that Whitetail in your sights, the 300 Win Mag won’t let you down so long as your shot placement is on point.

    Hunting season is fast approaching, it’s time to get out to the range and practice with your favorite bolt action rifle and get ready. Your trophy deer or elk is waiting for you, show him what a 30-06 or a .300 Win Mag can do!

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    a hunting rifle with ammo

    The .300 Winchester Magnum, known as the .300 Win Mag, is a big, bad magnum power cartridge. Its metric dimensions are 7.62x67mm. That makes it 23.8% bigger than the popular .308 Winchester at 7.62x51mm, and 6.3% bigger than the .30-06 at 7.62x63mm, 300 win mag long range shooting. It uses the same bullets as the .308 and .30-06, but it pushes them a greater distance downrange with a lot more velocity. While it has been surpassed in performance in recent years by technologically advanced newcomers, it remains the most popular .30 caliber magnum cartridge.

    History of the .300 Win Mag Cartridge

    The .300 Win Mag was not the first magnum cartridge, not even by a long shot. In fact, it was not even the first .30 caliber magnum in mass production. That distinction goes to the .300 H&H Magnum way back to 1925, followed by the .300 Weatherby Magnum appearing in 1944. The .300 Win Mag is actually the fourth magnum in a series of hard hitters and came out five years later in 1963. To bring the .300 Winchester Magnum to life, the Winchester Repeating Arms Company modified the heavyweight .338 Win Mag and re-released it in 1963 to use in the Model 70.

    The short neck of the .300 Win Mag has been a controversial topic. Some ballistic experts suggest it could negatively affect accuracy. The neck of the .300 Win Mag is shorter than the diameter of the bullet it carries, however, in real-world results, this has little influence over the bullet’s accuracy. While so many of the other magnums of the early 20th century went the way of the buffalo, the .300 Win Mag, which had a slow and unheralded beginning, has stood the test of time and remains tremendously popular.

    300 Win Mag Ammo Quick Answer Box:

    photo of 223 Rem cartridge compared to the 300 Win Mag

    From left to right: The .223 Rem cartridge compared to the .300 Win Mag.

    • Is .300 Win Mag bigger than .308? The .300 Win Mag is larger than the popular .308 round, although both use the same .30  caliber bullets. The .300 Win Mag measures in at 7.62x67mm, 300 win mag long range shooting, while the .308 cartridge measures in at 7.62x51mm.

    • What is the effective range of .300 Win Mag? With an optic zeroed at 270 yards, a factory 150gr .300 Win Mag bullet has an effective range of about 318 yards before needing hold-over to compensate for bullet drop. With an optic zeroed at 250 yards, a factory 180gr .300 Win Mag bullet has an effective range of about 300 yards before needing hold-over to compensate for bullet drop. The flat trajectory of the .300 Win Mag bullet allows skilled hunters with calibrated optics the ability to hit targets at 500 or even 1,000 yards away. 

    • Is .300 Win Mag better for hunting deer than .223 Rem? You’ve likely heard both sides of this argument. 223 is too weak of a round for deer hunting, or .300 Win Mag is too powerful of a round for deer hunting. Neither are true. If you are hunting deer in the 100-300 yard range, a quality .223 round like Federal Fusion 62gr will put food on your table with careful shot placement. If you are commonly hunting deer at distances of 300 yards or greater, you may need the extra reach of a Magnum cartridge like the .300 Win Mag. 150gr Winchester Super-X Power-Point in .300 Win Mag is specifically designed to stop a deer in its tracks well beyond the 300 yard range with a zeroed optic.

    .300 Win Mag Bullet Types

    Magnum calibers are not for casual plinkers. They are pricey, well-engineered rounds and depending on your gun, they are often not pleasant to shoot. Did I mention that they are pricey? An average box of 20 rounds of .300 Win Mag is 3X the price of an average box of .223 Rem. If you are going to pull the trigger on a weapon chambered in Magnum ammo, you may want to consider how much you are willing to invest in it. 

    On the bright side, the .300 Win Mag is common enough that pricing is kept to a reasonable level. There are a few of the more budget-friendly manufacturers that produce quality ammunition for it. Also, it is common enough that many of the economy-line rifles by leading manufacturers are now produced in the caliber.

    You may find some standard FMJ ammunition produced in the Magnum caliber (and the amateur re-loader can definitely do so if they wish, since it uses the common .30 caliber bullet), but the most common economy target and training load is a soft point, ranging in weight from 150gr to 180gr. 

    Soft Point

    By far the most prolific bullet type on .300 Win Mag is the soft point. A well-balanced bullet which has a good ballistic coefficient, is easily produced en masse. It’s likely to be godley football be flat-based or boat-tail. Since it shares projectiles with its very common little brothers, it is easy to see it as a Big Block .308 and that seems apropos considering the velocity and energy it delivers. But this is not universally true; not all bullet weights carry energy as well as others. The 150gr screams out of the gate at .223 velocities. It delivers a TON of energy at the muzzle but drops precipitously after 200 yards.

    However, the 180gr and 200gr samples hold onto much more energy at 500 yards.

    Hollow Point

    Like almost all other high powered rifle calibers, save the personal protection/defensive calibers, hollow points are generally reserved for precision and match usage only. Hollow point Magnum loads are less of a traditional hollow point and more of a divot. They are practically all boat-tail bullets, and on the heavier end of the spectrum, often in the 190gr-range.

    Nosler Accubond

    An interesting thing about the ammunition industry is how many of the major manufacturers use bullets made by other premium manufacturers (Nosler, Hornady, etc.) with their own proprietary blends of brass and propellants. It’s not uncommon to find this mixed brand assortment for .300 Win Mag, specifically in the Nosler bullet type.

    Nosler AccuBond is very popular due to its excellent flight profile, accuracy, and lethal impact. It uses a unique bonding process that prevents voids in the bullet’s core, creating the most stable flight path possible.

    The Best 300 Win Mag Ammo For Hunting

    Hornady American Whitetail 300 Win Mag 150 Grain SP Interlock

    photo of hornady american white tail best 300 win mag ammo

    Hornady American Whitetail is specifically designed with a soft-point edge for wound channel expansion.

    Everyone wants to feel the excitement of bringing home something from the hunt on opening day. Hornady decided to increase hunter’s chances of putting meat in the freezer and antlers on the wall with their American Whitetail cartridge. This SP Interlock design keeps the core and jacket together on impact. It features a lead alloy core for improved penetration in dense targets. Screaming out of the barrel at 3,275 FPS, Hornady records 3572ft/lbs of energy at the muzzle and maintains almost 2,000ft/lbs of target dropping power out to 300 yards. 

    Federal Vital-Shok 300 Win Mag 165 Grain Nosler Partition SP

    photo of federal vital shok best 300 win mag ammo outdoors

    Federal Vital Shok .300 Win Mag ammo uses the Nosler Partition soft point tip to increase penetration.

    Once again we see Federal Premium Ammunition utilizing the vicious Nosler Partition soft point. So why Partition? Sixty-five years of history must be on to something. Results don’t lie and hunters can be sure this round has slain a lot of game in that time. The partition is an ingenious design, using dual lead core with a copper partition separating the two. The leading core, the soft point, creates a wicked, irrecoverable wound. The aft core retains nearly all of its mass, hence all of its energy to push the bullet through the target.

    Federal loads the 300 win mag long range shooting Shok with a 165gr Partition that has a great ballistic coefficient of 0.409 and screams out of the brake at 3,050fps and 3,408ft/lbs of energy! What a hammer.

    Winchester Super-X 300 Winchester Magnum 150 Grain Power-Point

    photo of winchester super x best 300 win mag ammo outdoors

    Winchester Super-X Power-Point is a round designed for hunting deer, antelope, and wild boar.

    150gr loads are the top fuel dragsters of the .30 caliber bullet world and Winchester Super-X is no exception. Super-X PowerPoint ammo is a bonded soft point that is designed primarily for bringing down mid to larger sized game normally encountered in a forest environment, 300 win mag long range shooting.

    150gr PowerPoint are extremely fast at the muzzle, generally in the ballpark of 3,250-3,300fps with around 3,500ft/lbs of energy. As previously discussed, 150gr bullets in .300 Win Mag scream out of the muzzle with enormous energy but begin to drop off after passing 300 yards. That being said, Winchester Super-X is consistent with other 150gr loads and still carries between 1,300-1,400ft/lbs at 500 yards. That may not be favorable for elk, but ample for taking down whitetail and antelope at a distance.

    Federal Fusion 300 Winchester Magnum 180 Grain Fusion

    photo of federal fusion best 300 win mag ammo outdoors

    A 180gr round Federal Fusion round designed to bring down big game at distances of 500 yards or further.

    Federal Fusion is a bullet designed specifically for deer hunting and the 180gr carries plenty of wallop for that use, well out to and past 500 yards. The design is a soft point bullet with a boat tail, possessing a tremendous ballistic coefficient of 0.485. It is considerably slower upon launch than the 150gr bullets, However, it maintains much more energy through the curve. It will pound targets with authority well out of the effective range of lesser rounds.

    Is .300 Win Mag The Best Long Range Hunting Ammo?

    photo of a man shooting a hunting rifle outdoors

    With great bargains available on the market, the .300 Win Mag is an excellent choice for big game hunting.

    It’s an easy question to answer. If .300 Win Mag checks all the boxes you need for hunting performance, go for it! A .300 Win Mag is a great addition to any sportsman’s gun locker, now more than ever. With a large variety of solid budget bolt guns with price tags sometimes dipping sub-$300 (sans optics). No, you’re not probably going to use these budget rifles at match shoots, but they aren’t made for that. The casual hunter will find these rifles are very well suited for one shot, maybe two, with the best 300 Win Mag ammo in a hunt. You won’t have to worry about having to track a wounded animal for hours later, 300 win mag long range shooting.

    The .300 Win Mag offers a surprising amount of versatility for a Magnum cartridge. The 150gr SP rounds are capable of appealing to deer hunters. The heavier 180gr bullets are for those interested in bringing home big game. For the hand loader, the .300 Win Mag makes a ton of sense since as well.  Almost all rifle owners own either a .308 or .30-06 (most likely both) and the .30 caliber bullets are fully compatible.

    Let your fellow shooters know – share this article using the Facebook, 300 win mag long range shooting, Twitter and other social media icons below. The more we all know, the better organized and stronger the shooting and hunting community will be.

    300 win mag300 win mag ammo300 win mag noslerbest 300 win mag ammobest hunting ammofederal 300 win maghornady 300 win magwinchester 300 win mag

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    My Grandpa is an incredible hunter and an amazing shot. He hunted for many years with a 300 Win Mag so I thought I would get his opinion on this classic caliber. When I asked him what should be said about the 300 Win Mag he said without hesitation, “It kicks like a mule.” Although this is true, he and many others would not have used it for so long if it did not have so many desirable qualities as well. Over the years since its conception in 1963 it has become a staple not only in the hunting world, but also in target shooting and military use as well. In the context of long range shooting, the 300 Win Mag is often the standard that we measure all other cartridges against. The big question, though, is if it is the best long range hunting cartridge or not. 

    History

    30 caliber bullets as we know them have been around for over a century and have been used in standard military rounds until just recently. These military rounds included the 30-06 springfield and the 308 Winchester. These calibers are not particularly impressive in their trajectory and during the early through mid 1900s there was a lot of experimentation being done to develop a 30 cal cartridge with excellent ballistic performance.

    Some of the 30 cal rounds developed during this time include the .300 H&H Magnum in 1925, and the .300 Weatherby Magnum in 1944. In 1958 Winchester introduced the 338 Win Mag, the 264 Win Mag, and the 458 Win Mag. These cartridges were based off of the 375 H&H magnum brass with less taper in the body to allow for more powder. Finally in 1963 Winchester came out with their 300 version. This cartridges was based off the same brass as the previous 3 but had the shoulder moved farther forward to allow shooters to ream their .308 Normas or .30-338 Winchesters to accept the new 300 Win Mag. This cartridge proved to be what people were looking for and has outgrown all the other 30 calibers that existent at the time.

    Long Range Application

    One of the reasons that this cartridge has been so popular for so long is that it shoots a big bullet fast, 300 win mag long range shooting, allowing for great knockdown power and minimal compensation at standard distances. It’s a favorite of U.S. Military snipers and has seen action in battlefields around the world, 300 win mag long range shooting. When people graco pack n play sport to get into long range hunting this is often the first place they go but the question is if it is the best choice? Although this is a fairly popular debate lets compare the 300 Win Mag to the 7mm Rem Mag and look at the actual numbers.

    For shooting elk or similar sized critters a 160 to 180 grain bullet is just about ideal. A popular long range load for the 300 Win Mag near this range is the 190 grain Berger VLD. The 7mm counterpart is the 180 grain Berger VLD. In the standard Gunwerks loads these two bullets have identical muzzle velocities. The G7 BC however is quite different between the two bullets. The 180 grain 7mm bullet has a G7 BC of .659 while the 190 grain 30 cal bullet has a G7 BC all the way down at .570 despite it being 10 grains heavier. At 1000 yards this translates to an extra 20 inches of drop and 10 inches more drift in a 10 mph cross wind for the 300 Win Mag. In order to match the BC of the 7mm Rem Mag you have to go up to about a 210 grain bullet and still be pushing the same velocity. This is possible but unless you need the extra knockdown for larger game it is overkill, and, like my grandpa remembered, it will kick the snot out of you.

    Conclusion

    So the almighty Ballistic Coefficient has spoken and shown that at long ranges the slightly smaller bullets with better BCs will perform slightly better than the big 300s. Does that mean that the 300 Win Mag is a bad choice? I don’t think so. There are a lot of guys that like the 30 cal and if thats what you want or if thats what you have then I say go for it. On 300 win mag long range shooting other hand, if you want something that has as good or better performance as the 300 Win Mag with less recoil then 300 win mag long range shooting probably ought to look into the 7mm Rem Mag, or Gunwerks own 7 LRM which even outperforms the 7 Rem Mag.

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    Stitcher

    History Of The 6.5 Creedmoor and .300 Winchester Magnum

    The years following World War II were a true renaissance of civilian firearm and cartridge development in the United States. That time period saw a flood of new centerfire rifle cartridges like the .223 Remington. 243 Winchester. 280 Remington, and .308 Winchester.

    That same general time period also saw the start of “Magnum Era” when Winchester introduced a line of new belted magnum cartridges that utilized a modified .375 H&H case. The .458 Winchester Magnum came along first in 300 win mag long range shooting and was quickly followed by the .338 Winchester Magnum and the .264 Winchester Magnum during the next couple of years.

    All of those cartridges utilized a .375 H&H Magnum case necked down (or up, in the case of the .458 Win Mag) and shortened from 2.85″ to 2.5″ long. The designers used those shortened cases so all three cartridges would fit in a standard length rifle action (same as the .30-06 Springfield) instead of the longer magnum length action required by the original .375 H&H cartridge.

    Winchester offered those belted magnum cartridges in their legendary Model 70 rifle and marketed each one to a particular segment of the American hunting community: 300 win mag long range shooting .264 Win Mag to western hunters wanting a flatter shooting cartridge for longer range shots on thin-skinned game like pronghorn and mule deer (and potentially bigger game too), 300 win mag long range shooting .338 Win Mag to hunters pursuing really large and/or tough North American game like elk and moose, and the .458 Win Mag to hunters going afield after dangerous game like brown bear in Alaska or cape buffalo in Africa.

    While those cartridges were all commercially successful, Winchester didn’t stop with the .264. 338, and .458 Win Mag cartridges though.

    Remington sent shockwaves through the hunting and shooting worlds with the introduction of the 7mm Remington Magnum in 1962. That cartridge also used a shortened and necked down .375 H&H case and fired a 7mm/.284″ bullet. The new Remington cartridge was a massive commercial success and quickly began to take market share away from the .264 Winchester Magnum.

    Winchester responded with the introduction of the .300 Winchester Magnum (also known as the .300 Win Mag or .300 WM) in 1963.

    Built using a modified .338 Winchester Magnum case, the .300 Winchester Magnum basically duplicated the performance of the other fast .30 caliber cartridges of the day like the .308 Norma and .300 H&H Magnum. However, unlike those other .30 caliber magnums, the .300 Win Mag utilized a shorter case that fit in a standard length rifle action like the other new Winchester belted magnums as well as the 7mm Remington Magnum.

    Offering a dramatic improvement in performance over the venerable .30-06 Springfield that also compared favorably to the 7mm Rem Mag in many areas, the .300 Win Mag was an almost instant commercial success for Winchester and remains one of the most popular big game hunting cartridges in North America to this day.

    Now let’s fast forward a few decades.

    In the early 2000s, Dave Emary of Hornady Manufacturing and Dennis DeMille of Creedmoor Sports saw an opportunity to build a new cartridge for high power rifle competition shooting. Specifically, they wanted to build an ideal long range shooting cartridge that was just as accurate as the .308 at long distance, but with less recoil, less wind drift, and a flatter trajectory.

    They also wanted the cartridge to fit in a short action rifle.

    By modifying a .30 Thompson Center (.30 TC) case to shoot .264″ bullets, they successfully built a cartridge optimized for use with 4350 class propellants with a relatively large case capacity that could also accommodate long, heavy, high ballistic coefficient (BC) bullets without intruding into the powder column.

    Named the 6.5 Creedmoor (sometimes misspelled Creedmoore or Creedmore) in honor of the Creedmoor Matches and designed for use with a relatively fast 300 win mag long range shooting rifling twist rate, Emary and DeMille were quite successful in their goal of building the ideal competition shooting cartridge with a relatively flat trajectory.

    If you’d like to learn more about how the 6.5 Creedmoor compares to the .308 Winchester in more detail, read the article below:

    6.5 Creedmoor vs 308 Winchester Debate Settled

    A typical 6.5 Creedmoor load shoots a 140 grain bullet at about 2,700 fps (2,266 ft-lbs). So, the 6.5 Creedmoor does not have eye popping ballistics, but it is very accurate, has moderate recoil, and uses high BC bullets that retain energy and resist wind drift exceptionally well.

    For those reasons, the cartridge has seen a great deal of success in the hands 300 win mag long range shooting competition shooters and recently made the jump into the mainstream hunting community. The cartridge has become extremely popular among hunters and shooters who appreciate the mild recoil and great extended range performance of the cartridge.

    .300 Win Mag vs 6.5 Creedmoor: Cartridge Sizes

    You can see differences between the 6.5 Creedmoor and the .300 Winchester Magnum in the photos below.

    First, the .300 Winchester Magnum is physically much larger than the 6.5 Creedmoor.

    The Winchester cartridge has a longer overall length and uses a longer case than the 6.5 Creedmoor, 300 win mag long range shooting. That said, the 6.5 Creedmoor is designed to fit in a short action rifle while the longer .300 Win Mag requires the use of a long or standard length action.

    picture of 6.5 creedmoor vs 300 win mag bullets

    Bullet size is one of the other obvious differences between the 6.5 Creedmoor vs 300 Win Mag. Each cartridge uses different diameter bullets: .264″ for the Creedmoor and .308″ for the Win Mag.

    There is also a 300 win mag long range shooting difference in the most common bullet weights for each cartridge. The 6.5 Creedmoor most often utilizes bullet nike basketball chicago 2017 in the 95-160 grain range, 300 win mag long range shooting, with 120 grain, 300 win mag long range shooting, 129 grain, 140 grain, and 143 grain bullets being the most common. On the other hand, 300 win mag long range shooting, the 300 Win Mag commonly uses bullets in the 150-220 grain range with 150 grain, 165 grain, 180 grain, and 200 grain bullets being most common. 

    picture of 6.5 creedmoor vs 300 win mag base

    The .300 Win Mag also has a larger .532″ rim diameter while the 6.5 Creedmoor has a .473″ rim diameter.

    At the same time, the 6.5 Creedmoor has a steeper 30 degree shoulder (the .300 Win Mag has a 25 degree shoulder).

    Even so, the .300 Winchester Magnum has a much larger case capacity than the 6.5 Creedmoor since it’s so much longer and larger in diameter.

    The .300 Winchester Magnum is also loaded to a higher pressure than the 6.5 Creedmoor (64,000psi vs 62,000psi).

    Note: while the powder capacity figures listed below do give a good indication of the differences between the two cartridges, exact case capacities vary slightly according to the brand of brass used.

    picture of 6.5 creedmoor vs 300 win mag dimensions

    6.5 Creedmoor vs 300 Win Mag Ballistics

    Not surprisingly, the differences in the external dimensions of the 6.5 Creedmoor and the .300 Winchester Magnum translate into some pretty significant differences in their ballistic performance. This is illustrated in the table below comparing Hornady Precision Hunter, Nosler Trophy Grade Partition, and Winchester Deer Season XP factory ammunition.

    I chose those particular factory loads because they provide a good demonstration of the performance of each cartridge when using wide spectrum of different bullets. The Winchester loads use light for caliber bullets, the Nosler loads use heavy for caliber bullets, and the Hornady loads use heavy for caliber, exceptionally aerodynamic bullets for each cartridge.

    Specifically, the 6.5 Creedmoor loads use a 125gr Extreme Point (.540 BC), a 140gr Partition (.490 BC) and a 143gr ELD-X (.625 BC). The .300 Win Mag loads use a 150gr Extreme Point (.392 BC), a 180gr Partition (.474 BC), and a 200gr ELD-X (.597BC).

    Note that the bullets used by 6.5 Creedmoor in each load are more aerodynamic than those used by the .300 Winchester Magnum for the exact same load. More on this in a minute.

    All six loads used a 200 yard zero.

    picture of 6.5 creedmoor vs 300 win mag trajectory

    As you can see, the .300 Winchester Magnum fires a larger caliber and heavier bullet at a significantly faster muzzle velocity than the 6.5 Creedmoor. Even though the bullets used by the 6.5 Creedmoor are generally more aerodynamic, that 100-410 fps advantage in muzzle velocity with bullets that are 20-40% heavier translates into a flatter trajectory with less bullet drop at longer range.

    The .300 Win Mag also has a significant kinetic energy advantage over the 6.5 Creedmoor at all ranges. However, since the 6.5 Creedmoor uses more aerodynamic bullets with a higher ballistic coefficient, the gap in performance between the cartridges slightly decreases in size as range increases.

    Specifically, the .300 Winchester Magnum has about 38-57% more muzzle energy than the 6.5 Creedmoor with these three particular loads. That turns into a 300 win mag long range shooting advantage in favor of .300 Win Mag at 500 yards, which isn’t much of a change from the difference in energy at the muzzle.

    So, I think it’s fair to say that, while the Creedmoor does “catch up” a little bit at longer range, the .300 Win Mag hits significantly harder than the 6.5 Creedmoor at all reasonable hunting ranges.

    The chart below compares how much a 10 mile per hour crosswind impacts those same 6.5 Creedmoor and .300 Winchester Magnum loads out to 500 yards.

    picture of 6.5 creedmoor vs 300 win mag wind drift

    As you can see, even though the bullets from the .300 Win Mag are heavier and going faster, the 6.5 Creedmoor uses much more aerodynamic bullets that also offer pretty good resistance to wind drift. Even so, the difference between the 6.5 Creedmoor and .300 Win Mag is still pretty small in this regard.

    The Nosler Partition and Hornady ELD-X loads track each other almost exactly and the .300 Win Mag has a tiny advantage in each case. The .300 Win Mag Deer Season XP load drifts almost 3″ more than the 6.5 Creedmoor at 500 yards.

    The differences are of course smaller at shorter range.

    All things considered, it’s pretty much a wash or maybe a small edge in favor of the 6.5 Creedmoor as far as wind drift goes.

    Now let’s talk about recoil.

    The table below compares the recoil produced by the loads above using the Hornady ELD-X for each cartridge when fired from identical 7 pound rifles.

    picture of 6.5 creedmoor vs 300 win mag recoil

    Felt recoil will vary from shooter to shooter and rifle to rifle, but free recoil energy is still a useful way to compare cartridges.

    As you can see, the .300 Winchester Magnum has significantly more recoil than the 6.5 Creedmoor. In this case, the .300 Win Mag produces 150% more free recoil energy than the 6.5 Creedmoor.

    That should not be surprising at all, 300 win mag long range shooting. After all, 300 win mag long range shooting, the 6.5 Creedmoor was designed specifically to be a mild recoiling and sweet shooting cartridge while the .300 Win Mag is a heavy hitting belted magnum.

    Basically, the .300 Win Mag should be expected to hit harder on both ends, which is exactly the case.

    This can be mitigated to a certain extent with the use of a suppressor, muzzle brake, or a good recoil pad. So the extra recoil of the .300 Win Mag isn’t necessarily a deal breaker for many people. It’s still worth considering though.

    Don’t underestimate the impact that recoil has on the ability of a person to shoot accurately either. Some people do handle recoil better than others, but all other things being equal, they will absolutely shoot more accurately with a milder recoiling cartridge.

    Additionally, there are a couple of other factors that are also worth discussing.

    First, the .300 Win Mag uses larger diameter bullets than the 6.5 Creedmoor.

    Specifically, the larger diameter .308″ bullets 300 win mag long range shooting by the .300 Winchester Magnum have about 36% more frontal surface area (also known as cross sectional area) than the 6.5 Creedmoor (.0745 vs .0547 square inches). 300 win mag long range shooting other things being equal, a bigger bullet will make a bigger hole, cause more tissue damage, and result in more blood loss.

    picture of 6.5 creedmoor vs 300 win mag bullets

    Especially when combined with the fact that the .300 Win Mag carries more kinetic energy downrange than the 6.5 Creedmoor, those larger diameter bullets are certainly helpful when hunting big game.

    On the other hand, as we covered earlier, those longer, 300 win mag long range shooting, heavy for caliber .264″ bullets have a higher ballistic coefficient than the most common bullets used in the .300 Winchester Magnum though.

    The 6.5mm bore diameter is also in something of a sweet spot where it’s easier to manufacture very high BC bullets that aren’t especially heavy. Those aerodynamic projectiles don’t slow down as fast and are more resistant to wind drift.

    They 300 win mag long range shooting have a relatively high sectional density (SD).

    Sectional density (SD) is a measure of the ratio of the diameter of a projectile to its mass, 300 win mag long range shooting. All other things equal, a heavier projectile of a given caliber will be longer and therefore have a higher sectional density and consequently penetrate deeper than projectiles with a lower mass and sectional density.

    150 grain, 180 grain, 300 win mag long range shooting, and 200 grain .308″ bullets have sectional densities of .226. 271, and .301 respectively. At the same time, 120 grain, 129 grain, 300 win mag long range shooting, 140 grain, and 143 grain .264″ bullets have sectional densities of .246. 264. 287, and .293.

    There’s some overlap here, but with the exception of the absolute heaviest .300 Win Mag bullets, the 6.5 Creedmoor has a slight edge in sectional density. There’s not a darn thing wrong with the killing power or penetration capabilities of the .300 Win Mag, but this might help explain why the 6.5 Creedmoor tends to perform better on game than the modest ballistics of the cartridge on paper would suggest.

    What 300 win mag long range shooting 6.5 Creedmoor vs .300 Win Mag accuracy?

    The .300 Winchester Magnum is certainly capable of outstanding accuracy (often sub-MOA). However, the heavier recoil of the cartridge can make shot placement more challenging for certain people who are more recoil shy.

    On the other hand, the 6.5 Creedmoor was specifically designed as a mild recoiling competition shooting cartridge. At the same time, since it utilizes .264″ bullets, there is a bigger selection of high BC and high SD match grade hunting bullets available for the cartridge. 

    That’s basketball camps pensacola fl to say that the .300 Win Mag isn’t accurate or that there aren’t a bunch of good quality bullets available for it. It’s just that the overall design of the 6.5 Creedmoor gives that cartridge an edge over the .300 Winchester Magnum in potential accuracy at extended range.

    So where do we stand with each cartridge?

    6.5 Creedmoor vs 300 Win Mag

    The .300 Win Mag fires larger diameter and significantly heavier bullets at a higher velocity than the 6.5 Creedmoor, 300 win mag long range shooting. The .300 Win Mag has a flatter trajectory and has 300 win mag long range shooting more kinetic energy at typical hunting ranges, but the 6.5 Creedmoor has much less recoil.

    All things considered, the two cartridges have vastly different strengths and are optimized for different uses. The .300 Win Mag has definite advantages in velocity, bullet weight, retained energy, and trajectory while the 6.5 Creedmoor has much less recoil and may have a tiny advantage in terms of wind drift.

    So, what about the claim some people have made that the 6.5 Creedmoor is basically the same as the .300 Win Mag, just with less recoil?

    I think it’s pretty clear that the .300 Win Mag is in an entirely different class from the 6.5 Creedmoor (to include recoil).

    Similar to (but not quite as extreme as) the comparison of the .223 to the .308, the 6.5 Creedmoor and .300 Win Mag are vastly different cartridges.

    The 6.5 Creedmoor is a short action cartridge designed to use very high BC bullets and produce minimal recoil. Those bullets also have a relatively high SD and tend to penetrate very well.

    Those aforementioned strengths of the 6.5 Creedmoor all facilitate precise shot placement, which is extremely important when it comes to ethically taking game.

    On the other hand, the .300 Win Mag has a definite, though not gigantic, advantage over the 6.5 Creedmoor in external ballistics at typical hunting ranges. While that’s certainly something to keep in mind, 300 win mag long range shooting, laser rangefinders and modern scopes with easily adjustable ballistic turrets (like the Leupold VX-5) make adjusting for bullet drop much simpler now than it was a few decades ago.

    Instead, I think the killing power of the .300 Win Mag vs 6.5 Creedmoor is the biggest difference between them.

    For one thing, the .300 Win Mag also carries a whole lot more energy downrange than the Creedmoor. The cartridge also uses significantly heavier bullets and has a big advantage when it comes to frontal surface area. Those traits give hunters a tiny bit more room for error in shot placement when compared to the 6.5 Creedmoor.

    Add it all up and the .300 Win Mag just hits with a whole lot more “authority” than the 6.5 Creedmoor and the cartridge is renowned worldwide for being an extremely effective hunting round on all manner of game.

    .300 Win Mag vs 6.5 Creedmoor Barrel Life

    Both cartridges have reputations for being rough on barrels. Exactly how fast they’ll 300 win mag long range shooting wear out a barrel depends on a number of factors like the quality of the barrel, the exact ammunition used, etc.

    However, the good news for hunters is that typical .300 Win Mag and 6.5 Creedmoor barrel life is most likely long enough to last for many, many years of hunting with no issues at all.

    So, there is very little practical difference in 6.5 Creedmoor vs 300 Win Mag barrel life as far as most hunters are concerned.

    .300 Win Mag vs 6.5 Creedmoor Ammo

    The .300 Winchester Magnum and the 6.5 Creedmoor are both extremely popular centerfire rifle cartridges. Indeed, they’re usually among the top 10 most popular cartridges in the USA each year right now. As popular as the .300 Win Mag is, the 6.5 Creedmoor is probably a little more popular right now.

    That said, they’re both widely used and ammo is easy to find for both. Availability also likely varies regionally though. For instance, 300 win mag long range shooting. 300 Win Mag ammo is probably more common in places like Alaska.

    On the other hand, 6.5 Creedmoor ammo is typically noticeably cheaper than .300 Win Mag ammo.

    The big ammunition manufacturers like Barnes, Berger, Browning, Federal Premium, Hornady, HSM Nosler, Remington, Sierra, Sig Sauer, Swift, and Winchester produce an incredible variety of .300 Winchester Magnum and 6.5 Creedmoor factory ammunition. In each case, there is normally a good selection of bullet types and weights for each cartridge suitable for big game hunting.

    During normal times, it’s usually very easy to find ammo for both cartridges and almost any gun or sporting goods store will have a wide variety of .300 Winchester Magnum and 6.5 Creedmoor ammo in stock.

    Ammo availability is also usually excellent online and the bigger retailers typically have a good selection of quality factory ammo for both cartridges as well.

    BUY SOME GREAT 6.5 CREED AMMO HERE

    BUY SOME EXCELLENT .300 WINCHESTER AMMO HERE

    If you’d like to learn more about some of the various hunting ammunition choices for the 6.5 Creedmoor and .300 Winchester Magnum cartridges, read these articles:

    Best 6.5 Creedmoor Ammo For Hunting Elk, Deer, And Other Big Game

    Best 300 Winchester Magnum Ammo For Hunting Elk, Deer, 300 win mag long range shooting, And Other Big Game

    Handloaders will appreciate the fact that reloading components for both cartridges are also readily available and there’s an especially wide variety of bullet choices for each cartridge. So, 300 win mag long range shooting, you should not have any trouble working up a good custom load for either one if you like to handload.

    The 6.5 Creedmoor shoots the same .264″ bullet size that’s also used by the 6.5×55 Swede, 6.5 Grendel. 260 Rem, and 6.5 PRC (among others).

    The .300 Winchester Magnum uses the same .308″ bullet size as the .308 Winchester. 30-30 Winchester. 30-06 Springfield, 300 WSM. 300 Ultra Mag, and .300 PRC.

    Bullets like the Barnes LRX, TSX, TTSX, and TAC-X, the Berger VLD and Hybrid Hunter, the Hornady A-Max, ELD-X, GMX, InterBond, InterLock, SST, and V-Max, the Nosler AccuBond, Ballistic Tip, E-Tip, and Partition, the Sierra GameChanger and GameKing, the Swift Scirocco and A-Frame, (just to name a few) are options for if you want to reload the .300 Winchester Magnum and the 6.5 Creedmoor.

    picture of 6.5 creedmoor vs 300 win mag bullets

    300 Win Mag vs 6.5 CreedmoorRifles

    In addition to the great selection of ammunition available in .300 Winchester Magnum and 6.5 Creedmoor, there are also many quality rifles manufactured in these cartridges.

    Both cartridges are extremely common in bolt-action rifles. In fact, just about every really popular bolt-action hunting rifle in current production is available in both cartridges.

    For instance, both the .300 Winchester Magnum and 6.5 Creedmoor are available in several different versions of the Remington Model 700 and Winchester Model 70. 300 win mag long range shooting same goes for the Browning X-Bolt, Browning AB3, Christensen Arms Mesa, Christensen Arms Ridgeline, Kimber Hunter, Mauser M18, Mossberg Patriot, Nosler M48, Remington Model 7, Ruger American, Ruger Hawkeye, Savage Axis, Savage 110, Tikka T3x, Weatherby Vanguard, and Winchester XPR.

    Remember when I mentioned earlier that the 6.5 Creedmoor will fit in a short-action rifle while the .300 Win Mag requires the use of a long/standard length action rifle? Well, this means that rifles chambered in 6.5 Creedmoor have a shorter bolt than the exact same rifle chambered in .300 Win Mag.

    Additionally, (this has nothing to do with a rifle having a short or a long-action), gun manufacturers tend to put longer barrels on rifles chambered in .300 Win Mag. So all things considered, rifles chambered in .300 Win Mag tend to be slightly longer, heavier, and more unwieldy than rifles chambered in 6.5 Creedmoor.

    The Ruger Hawkeye Hunter illustrates these differences well.

    When chambered in 6.5 Creedmoor, the rifle has a 22″ barrel, an overall length of 42″, and weighs 7.2 pounds. The same rifle chambered in 300 win mag long range shooting Winchester Magnum has a 24″ barrel, is 44.75″ long, 300 win mag long range shooting, and weighs 8.2 pounds.

    The rifle chambered in .300 Winchester Magnum is almost 3″ longer and weighs nearly a pound more than the 300 win mag long range shooting same model chambered in 6.5 Creedmoor.

    Having a shorter and lighter rifle is more important on some hunts than on others. So, just keep that in mind.

    BUY A NICE 6.5 CREEDMOOR HUNTING RIFLE HERE

    BUY A GREAT .300 WIN MAG HUNTING RIFLE HERE

    6.5 Creedmoor vs 300 Win Mag: Which Is Right For You?

    Do you primarily hunt medium sized game like whitetail deer, feral hogs, or black bear at ranges within 200 yards? Both are extremely effective deer hunting cartridges and will absolutely get the job done on medium sized game if you do your part. The 6.5 Creedmoor in particular is a great deer hunting cartridge. There’s nothing wrong with using the .300 Win Mag on deer inside of 200 yards, but it’s really more gun than you need for that sort of work though (and it’s rougher on both the shoulder and wallet).

    If you’re going to be hunting in thick brush or in the tight confines of a deer stand, remember what I just mentioned about 300 win mag long range shooting size difference with 6.5 Creedmoor vs 300 Win Mag rifles. That extra couple of inches in overall length of a rifle can be a real headache to deal with when trying to quickly and quietly maneuver for a shot.

    Are you looking for the cartridge better suited for long range hunting for game like mule deer or pronghorn in 300 win mag long range shooting country where you might need to take a shot at several hundred yards? Once again, they’ll both work really well in this role. The 6.5 Creedmoor is a good choice for this sort of hunting, but the .300 Win Mag carries a lot more energy out past 200 yards.

    Do you want a hunting cartridge that’s well suited for caribou, moose, elk, eland, kudu, or red stag hunting? The 6.5 Creedmoor will get the job done in a pinch, but hunters need to be careful with their shot angles (broadside or slightly quartering shots are best) and should probably stick to shots under 250 yards on elk sized game.

    The .300 Win Mag is hands down the better choice for hunting bigger game since it shoots significantly heavier and larger diameter bullets that carry more kinetic energy downrange. The result is that the .300 Winchester Magnum has a longer effective range and gives hunters more flexibility with shot angles on really big game when compared to the 6.5 Creedmoor.

    Are you sensitive to recoil and in need of a serious low recoil cartridge? The 6.5 Creedmoor has significantly less recoil than the .300 Win Mag, especially in a lighter rifle. So, this cartridge is especially well suited to new, small framed, and or recoil shy hunters. Indeed, the 6.5 Creedmoor is extremely popular for children to use for deer hunting because it is so effective on deer and has such mild recoil.

    Do you want the round that is best suited for target shooting out past 400 yards or so in a precision rifle? Both will work and have excellent reputations for precision shooting, but since we’re just punching paper or banging steel, I lean towards the 6.5 Creedmoor since it has such mild recoil and is specifically designed to use very high BC, match grade bullets.

    The 6.5 Creedmoor and .300 Win Mag are both excellent rifle cartridges, albeit ones with very different strengths and weaknesses. Though the differences between them (6.5 Creedmoor vs 300 Win Mag) are significant in some respects, they’re both suitable for many hunting tasks. Get a good hunting rifle chambered in the cartridge that you think fits your needs the best, learn to shoot it well, use quality bullets, and you’ll be all set for most hunting situations. Good luck!

    NEXT: 308 vs 30-06 SPRINGFIELD vs 300 WIN MAG: WHICH SHOULD YOU HUNT WITH?

    Enjoy this article comparing the 6.5 Creedmoor and .300 Winchester Magnum cartridges? Please share it with your friends on Facebook and Twitter.

    The Lyman 50th Edition (p183-184 and p260-262) and Hornady 10th Edition (p317-322 and p574-585) reloading manuals were used as references for the history of the cartridges. I obtained the data used to compare the trajectory of the cartridges from Hornady (here and here), Nosler (here and here), and Winchester (here and here). Data used to calculate recoil was obtained from the Hornady reloading manual. Case capacities were obtained from Chuck Hawks (here and here). Maximum pressure obtained from 300 win mag long range shooting (p23 & 30). I used ShootersCalculator.com to compare trajectory and recoil for the cartridges.

    Make sure you subscribe to The Big Game Hunting Podcast and follow The Big Game Hunting Blog on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, and YouTube.

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