Sports blood test uk

sports blood test uk

Our guide to sports performance blood testing. A great way to improve your performance is to understand what's going on inside your body. Our cutting-edge algorithmic engine will analyze your blood, DNA, and lifestyle habits, and guide you to Physician-ordered tests only give you numbers. From blood and DNA testing to HRV, here we focus on the latest comes in at £139 whereas the Endurance Plus (forthedge.co.uk) is £99.

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How cool would it be for us amateur athletes to have the same advantages of professional athletes? Things like a personalized nutritional plan, training regimens based on blood markers, and other high-tech diagnostics? Truth is, you've always had that access—through blood testing. 

Many think blood testing is something reserved for when you have a medical problem or simply part of your yearly health checkup. However, blood contains an amazing amount of information, and testing can be used as a systematic tool to help you train better, gauge recovery and personalize your nutritional plan. 

Athletes, coaches and everyday fitness enthusiasts can use blood testing to ensure they are primed for optimal performance. Blood monitoring is an objective and direct assessment of what’s happening under the hood of an athlete. Blood testing can also be used to address small imbalances, diagnose overtraining or even predict potentially larger problems. Among the benefits, the information from a blood test can guide changes that will improve metabolism, optimize mood, build muscle, and reduce inflammation.

A clean bill of health from blood testing gives coaches the confidence to push their athletes harder, knowing they aren’t putting the body at risk both in the short-term and long-term.

What to test?

Start with the basics: basic metabolic panel (BMP), complete blood count (CBC), serum iron, ferritin, folate, B12, magnesium, potassium, calcium and sodium. 

The basic metabolic panel (BMP) involves eight tests that provide important information about the current status of a person's metabolism, including health of the kidneys, blood glucose level, and electrolyte and acid/base balance.

A complete blood count (CBC) evaluates your overall health and detects a wide range of disorders. This test looks at levels of:

Red blood cells, which carry oxygen;

White blood cells, which fight infection;

Hemoglobin, the oxygen-carrying protein in red blood cells;

Hematocrit, the percentage of red blood cells in the blood; 

Platelets, which help with blood clotting;

Sodium, an essential electrolyte that helps maintain the balance of water in and around your cells; 

Potassium, which plays an important role in regulating your heartbeat, muscle function, and nerve impulses;

Iron, which your body needs to make hemoglobin-rich red blood cells, which carry oxygen from your lungs to your muscles; and

Calcium, which strengthens bones, contracts your muscles, sends and receivse nerve signals and releases hormones. 

How to read your test

Blood test results can be a great motivator for change, however the real difference between routine tests and athlete-specific tests is in the ranges by which you are analyzing the results. The “normal” reference ranges that most health practitioners use to evaluate lab results are considered normal ranges for the general population, but most endurance athletes can hardly be considered normal.

For your report to have a beneficial impact on your health and athletic performance, it is very important how and by whom your results are analyzed. It makes it easy if your health practitioner understands your lifestyle and goals to properly interpret the results, otherwise they may recommend someone who can. 

If you’re going to do a blood test, it’s also important that you retest after introducing any changes. If you’re not retesting, there’s no way to tell if there’s actually been a change. 

When to test

Get tested early in the season before starting any high-volume training to provide a good baseline panel. The next time to test is after ramping up in training, to see how that influenced physiology and also compare results to previous years. It is a good idea to test after all big training blocks and before all the key races to make sure you're going into the race with the right taper and your nutritional plan is well optimized. We usually test athletes 4-6 weeks before the race.

General testing recommendations:

For an athlete training 5-8 hours per week: 1 pre-race test before a big race 

For an athlete training 8-12 hours per week: 1 pre-season test and a test prior to each major race

For an athlete training 12+ hours per week: 1 pre-season test, a pre-race test following first big training block or "B" race, and a test prior to any "A" race.

If you’re looking to ensure you’re in optimum health, consider getting your blood checked. It can provide insights that standard fitness testing cannot and can be performed quickly and affordably.

Lauren Babineau contributed to this article.

Lance Watson is an IRONMAN U Master Coach and LifeSport head coach. He has trained many IRONMAN, Olympic and age-group champions over the past 30 years and enjoys coaching athletes of all levels. Contact Lance to tackle your first IRONMAN or to perform at a higher level.

For more training tips, visit LifeSport Coaching on Facebook or on Twitter at #LifeSportCoach.

Источник: [https://torrent-igruha.org/3551-portal.html]

Optimal Athlete Female Blood Test

Optimal Athlete Female Blood Profile - With Nurse 

  • A full sports related blood work assessment
  • Yields a wealth of detailed information

Looking for a test that can help fine-tune your athletic performance? If you are a woman, performing at the top of your game requires optimisation of hormonal health as well as other bodily functions.

The nearly noninvasive Optimal Athlete Female panel will give you a full, sports-related bloodwork assessment that yields a wealth of detailed information - biomarkers that provide insights into your body's functional status and may enable detection of biological changes.

Testing covers cholesterol and iron levels, and enables evaluation of liver and kidney function. It also measures your steroid hormones - testosterone, oestradiol (an oestrogen). It also includes SHBG, a protein that allows these two hormones to bind, and the all-important thyroid hormones, T3 & T4.

Testosterone helps women develop lean muscle mass and strength, and improve metabolic function. Oestrogen may help alleviate the pain of high-intensity training.

The information gained from this test can provide motivation, enable you and your doctor to identify any health risks or hurdles to overcome, and set goals and define strategies for improvement. Retesting provides an ideal method of monitoring your training progress.

This test is not available as a finger prick test and is only available in a vacutainer kit with a nurse visit. 

Fast for 8 hours if LDL and Triglycerides required. Must be returned to lab same day as the blood draw.

  • Convenient testing in the comfort of your own home/office
  • Accredited UK lab
  • Results analysed by a qualified UK doctor
  • Confidential results returned by email - Turnaround time 1-2 working days

This test includes: 

  • Testosterone
  • SHBG
  • Free Testosterone (calc)
  • Bioavailable Testosterone (calc)
  • Oestradiol
  • Creatinine for Kidney monitoring
  • Iron
  • Protein
  • Albumin
  • Globulin
  • eGFR
  • ALT
  • AST
  • ALP
  • GGT
  • Bilirubin
  • Total Cholesterol
  • LDL  Cholesterol
  • HDL Cholesterol
  • Triglycerides
  • FSH
  • TSH
  • FT3
  • FT4
  • LH
  • Haemoglobin
  • Red Blood Cells
  • Haematocrit
  • Mean Cell Volume
  • Red Cell Distribution
  • Mean Cell Haemoglobin
  • Platelets
  • White Blood Cells
  • Neutrophils
  • Lymphocytes
  • Monocytes
  • Eosinophils
  • Basophils
  • Your professional vacutainer kit will arrive by post it includes everything you need for a professional blood draw. Also includes instructions and a return envelope
  • You have chosen the With Nurse In Attendance Option
  • The nursing team will contact you by text to arrange a convenient time for your appointment
  • You must not make an appointment if your kit has not arrived. If you receive a text from the nursing team ask them to call back
  • If you make an appointment and for some reason, your kit does not arrive both you and myoptimalwellbeing will receive an additional charge
  • We advise making appointments between Monday and Wednesday, the latest day the lab can receive samples is a Thursday
  • Once your blood has been taken, make sure all of your personal information is correct, place the vials in the envelope provided
  • The envelope  must be returned to the lab on the day fo the draw; we advise you to take the envelope to the post office and return bu guaranteed next day delivery to ensure arrival at the lab next day
  • Your results will be sent to you by email

 

Источник: [https://torrent-igruha.org/3551-portal.html]

Sports science: 3 laboratory tests designed to help you improve your performance

Session complete, time for that much-needed warm-down via the Red Lion. With red wine to hand – it’s all about the antioxidants these days – you and your tri crew, in unison, download your last 120 minutes of riding to your smartphone for a series of graphs and numbers that tell you just how strong or not you are. Stress score, average power, average speed – this is the sort of tech that’s easily understood by most and, more importantly, can result in the necessary training tweaks for improved performance.

How valuable are physiological performance tests for predicting your Ironman potential?

Because ultimately that’s what technology and its integration – or infiltration, depending on your viewpoint – into your triathlon training and racing is all about. The problem is, our sport’s awash with so-called innovations that, once the shine’s worn off, don’t add anything to your swim, bike and run sessions. Your latest £500 outlay’s soon collecting dust with that sit-up machine you bought from the Sunday supplement.

Analysing every ‘innovation’ to hit the market would require an issue that matched War and Peace for length. That’s why we’ve pinpointed the ones we feel have credence behind them – whether scientific or anecdotal – and really hone in on those to help you not only better understand these products, but also make you think a little more deeply about other potentially ground-breaking training tools. Knowledge is power – and power can save you a small fortune!

BLOOD TESTING FOR TRIATHLETES

The Brownlees brothers’ respective careers have seen them jointly or individually rack up Olympic medals, be nominated for BBC Sports Personality of the Year and have a post box painted gold in their honour. From March this year, added to that list was a blood test, the boys working in collaboration with Swedish company Werlabs. “To get through the mental and physical wear and tear of our training it’s vital that we’re in peak condition, both physically and mentally,” Alistair commented at launch. “That’s why together with Werlabs we created this test that looks at over 30 blood values.”

An endurance athlete’s association with blood is nothing new, yet it’s tended to have nefarious associations. The Brownlee test, similar to those from established outfits like Forth Edge, is purely legal, of course, and focuses on biomarkers related to optimum endurance performance like creatine, C-reactive protein and haemoglobin. The test measures the level of each. Take the latter, whose primary role is to transport oxygen around the body. Low levels can signify anaemia, requiring an iron supplement; too high could be dehydration, requiring fluid.

More boxes ticked

The Brownlee test is comprehensive yet, unlike Forth Edge’s Endurance Plus, it doesn’t measure testosterone levels. Arguably that’s a significant omission, especially for athletes training in three disciplines. Over to Dr Will Manger, an expert on the subject. “Low testosterone levels result in a drop in power output and are a sign of overtraining,” he says. “So we’d advise active recovery (e.g. a gentle bike) and relaxation techniques, like deep breathing. And as testosterone’s made up of cholesterol, we’d recommend good-quality fats from olive oil and fish.” Still, with 34 blood markers analysed, the Brownlees’ blood test ticks more athletic boxes than Forth Edge’s dozen or so.

Choice then comes down to convenience and cost. The Brownlees’ test requires a home visit by a nurse with results accessible within 24hrs via a secure online journal; Forth Edge deliver a finger-prick sample kit that, once you’ve taken your blood, you send back for analysis. You then get the results via an app within days.

As for cost, the Brownlees’ (werlabs.co.uk) comes in at £139 whereas the Endurance Plus (forthedge.co.uk) is £99. While relatively affordable, they’re both meaningless if you don’t repeat the tests, with Forth Edge recommending every three, four or six months.

Also be aware that blood testing provides only a ‘snapshot’ and that certain factors, such as recent meals, hard training and minor illness, may skew results.

HRV TRAINING FOR TRIATHLETES

Another innovative training tool, although one that’s flirted with the masses for a while, is heart-rate variability (HRV). HRV is essentially the time interval between heart beats and is a gauge of your nervous system. It can be measured via a chest strap from Omegawave or credible apps, like HRV4 training, that detect changes in blood volume by placing your finger on your smartphone.

So what are you looking for? Over to Simon Wegerif, founder of HRV training tool ithlete, who we spoke to at the recent Science & Cycling Conference in Nantes, France. “The idea is that small variations in the beat-to-beat timing of the heart reflect the body’s level of stress. Each person has a characteristic amount of variation when they’re well recovered, and the variation decreases when they’re stressed. A daily morning reading is compared to their own baseline and used to determine how recovered they are.”

So if you wake up one morning and your HRV is very low – a sign of stress and potential overtraining – and you planned a high-intensity run session, you may decide to do an active recovery swim session instead. And vice versa. “The great thing about HRV training is that it considers numerous factors that affect stress,” continues Wegerif. “This includes sleep quality, fuelling status and even jetlag.”

OBJECTIVE MEASUREMENT

To maximise HRV training, you need to measure HRV as soon as you awake (and certainly before coffee), and you must take daily readings. The more readings, the more data, the better the results. Also, HRV training works best when used with other ‘ready-to-train’ tools, like the popular Training Peaks and their stress score.

That’s the theory, but what about in the coalface of triathlon? “I’ve used the ithlete app and finger sensor to measure HRV mostly daily for a number of years,” says age-group triathlete Ian Waters. “This gives you the HRV value as a number and the number is green, amber or red. Green means all is good and carry on as normal; amber means you should lower intensity; and red means you should rest. I started using ithlete because I wanted to push myself as far as possible and have an objective measure to whether I was pushing too hard.”

Waters feels it’s a useful tool, though we question whether not knowing exactly what you’re going to do that day can result in a seemingly arbitrary training plan? “Not at all,” he replies. “On days I get a red I’ll rest, and usually by the next day it’s back into green.”

Ithlete, Omegawave and HRV Training offer numerous packages with the ithlete app starting from £6.99.

DNA TESTING

Many triathletes delve even deeper by undertaking a DNA test. Muhdo is one of a growing band of companies, including arguably the most well-known DNAFit, offering DNA profiling to maximise your performance via ‘bespoke’ training and nutrition advice. Its potential for ‘customised’ advice holds great appeal with researchers believing the global market for such kits could be worth more than £8billion by 2022.

The idea’s simple. The DNA testing company send you a kit where you take a swab of your mouth, pop it into a test tube and send it back to, say, Muhdo who’ll ‘perform a detailed analysis of your DNA to provide you with personalised fitness recommendations’.

“We test for the nucleobase pairs within a SNP (single nucleotide polymorphism) of a gene,” explains Muhdo’s Chris Collins. “We then examine certain base characteristics that are collated into categories such as stamina, power, VO2 max, etc. We also look at dietary markers.”

These SNPs are the heart of Muhdo and their competitors’ offerings. For every gene there are three possible combinations of SNPs. E.g. with the ACE gene (see below) you can either have II, DD or ID, with each expressing a certain physical and mental characteristic. In the case of the ACE gene, II is linked with endurance capabilities while DD is associated with power.

The ace gene

The likes of Muhdo and DNAFit have isolated genes that, they say, have enough research behind them to influence different parameters of performance, of which they’ll then offer training or nutrition advice. For instance, the gene ACTN3 is associated with power; PPARA regulates fat; and VEGF, blood vessel growth and so endurance. And then there’s that ACE gene, which is involved in blood pressure control and, subsequently, power and endurance.

ACE first came to prominence in 1998 when Professor Hugh Montgomery studied army recruits undergoing basic training. Montgomery showed that subjects with the II combination enjoyed the greatest endurance increases; those with DD the least. So, by virtue, II was linked to endurance performance.

Simple? No. Noted geneticist Yannis Pitsiladis took DNA samples from 221 national Kenyan athletes, 70 international Kenyan athletes and 85 members of the general population. The results showed that the II genotype of the ACE gene wasn’t strongly linked with elite endurance status. “Their success isn’t down to favourable genetic characteristics,” argues Pitsiladis. “It’s more tied in with chronic exposure to altitude in combination with moderate-volume, high-intensity training, plus a strong psychological motivation to succeed for economic and social advancement.”

More research required

Pitsiladis feels the field is too immature for commercialisation and more research is required. Then again, there’s recent research like this that adds support to DNA companies: the University of Trieste found that those following dietary advice based on genetic analysis lost 33% more weight than a controlled group.

And, as it stands, nutrition advice based on DNA is arguably more valid than training advice. That’s certainly the experience of age-grouper Waters. “The results from the DNAFit test kit showed low VO2 max potential, high injury risk and slow recovery. None of this matched my experience. I train twice a day, log 15hrs per week and have rarely missed training because of failure to recover. So I ignored the advice.

“When it came to nutrition, however, it showed carb sensitivity so advised a low-carb diet. It also mentioned an increased need for antioxidants, B and D vitamins and omega-3. I followed the advice, lost a lot of weight, and felt fuelled and ready for each training session.”

Some experts agree there’s more validity in nutrition than training recommendations, with the genetic variations behind a condition like lactose intolerance well-understood. But then there’s unpicking how much impact derives from genes or simple behavioural changes. “I hadn’t struggled to lose weight in the past,” Waters continues, “so I’d no way of knowing whether this was a help or not.”

Advice like increasing omega-3 also feels generic but, argues Collins, this and Pitsiladis’ comments are an easy stick to beat DNA companies with. “Research is building in what’s a fast-moving industry; within just a year, one company could collect 1,000 samples and conduct studies that move the field on.”

As for cost, DNAFit’s Diet & Fitness (dnafit.com) is £249; Muhdo’s (mudho.com) £249.99.

WHAT DOES THE FUTURE HOLD?

Blood testing, DNA analysis and HRV training are a snapshot of the tools that triathletes around the world are using in search of a new personal best. But what of the future? It’s a question we posed to triathlon coach and
author Matt Fitzgerald, but first, elite triathlon coach Tom Bennett.

“Keep an eye out for the emergence of ketones for fuelling endurance performance,” says Bennett. “There’s research that these are superior to carbohydrates in fuelling triathletes.” Ketones differ to ketosis, which
is essentially a high-fat, low-carb diet with the aim of utilising more fat and sparing precious glycogen reserves. Studies show this approach is limiting at higher intensities of exercise. Instead, ketones are a supplement, significantly reducing the time to achieve dietary ketosis – favourable when exercising. Currently, there are two downsides, with cost reported at £2,000 a litre and a very bitter taste.

“In-dwelling sensors beyond heart rate and GPS are also not far away,” Bennett continues, meaning tools that non-invasively measure important determinants of endurance performance like muscle glycogen and lactate levels.

As for Fitzgerald, well, his recommendations and concurrent concerns provide the perfect conclusion to our look at integrating tech into your triathlon training. “I recommend specific products and tools to athletes in certain situations, but these are just as likely to be low-tech (e.g. the Sacro-Wedgy for [buttock pain-causing] piriformis syndrome) as high-tech (e.g. the Alter-G anti-gravity treadmill for training through impact-related injuries).

“I like to see a certain degree of penetration within the elite echelon before I support a particular tool,” believes Fitzgerald. “Yet this happens more often with methodologies, like glycogen-depleted sessions, than with technologies. In fact, I spend more time steering athletes away from high-tech gadgets and gimmicks and tamping down the ‘magic-bullet mentality’ that underlies their draw. I’m not anti-technology but most triathletes stand to gain more from focusing on the basics, such as building pain tolerance and body awareness – processes that some technologies directly thwart.”

OTHER CUTTING EDGE TECH TO TRY

Three more innovative ways to refine your tri training and racing

 GOLDEN CHEETAH

An impressive piece of software built by people who believe that the data should be freed from manufacturers like Garmin and Polar. As such, you have to download it to your PC or Mac. You’re then given a complete set of power metrics including ‘W Prime’, which essentially quantifies how many matches you’ve burned and was developed by Exeter University’s Dr Phil Skiba. It’s also free.

INSCYD

An extremely smart piece of software that provides a multitude of data including, uniquely, a breakdown of how much energy you get from carbohydrate and fat metabolism. Also records useful measures of performance like anaerobic capacity and economy of movement. Used by Jan Frodeno’s coach Dan Lorang, though currently only of use and availability to coaches and sports scientists.

 ATHOS CLOTHING

For the past couple of years, San Francisco start-up Athos has designed and created fitness clothing that features sensors to reveal extensive muscle and heart-rate data. The data’s then wirelessly transferred to an app on your smartphone.

Источник: [https://torrent-igruha.org/3551-portal.html]

Sport & Performance Blood Test Profile Wolverhampton & Shrewsbury

What do Sport Performance Blood Tests Look for?

We have a dedicated sport and performance blood test profile that examines the following:

  • Full Blood Count
  • Renal Function
  • Liver Function
  • Creatine Kinase
  • Total Protein
  • HbA1c
  • Iron
  • Transferrin
  • Lipids
  • FT4
  • TSH
  • Testosterone
  • Oestradiol

The results for these biomarkers demonstrate how your body is recovering after training, how it is absorbing nutrients, how you are handling stress and tension, and how your metabolism is functioning. All of these aspects are key in creating a training program that is tailored to your needs. Increased CRP could mean you need more rest time between training, or low testosterone levels can be improved by increasing strength training. 

Blood testing can also help you to identify any problems or deficiencies before they stop a sporting career completely. Understanding what your body needs will help you perform at a higher level for longer as well as inform you on staying strong and healthy when your sporting career ends.

What is involved in a Sport Performance Blood Test?

Sport performance blood tests are done by taking a small sample of blood and sending it for testing. When you arrive for your appointment you will be asked a few questions before one of our medical team takes your blood. A thin needle is used to extract blood from a vein in your arm. The sample is labelled and sent to the laboratory for testing and you are free to go.

You may experience slight bruising and discomfort at the needle site, but this will pass within a few days.

Results are sent directly to you as soon as they are ready in a secure and easy to read PDF file. If you would prefer a hard copy of your results please let us know.

How much does it cost?

Although we are a private healthcare provider, our priority is you and your health. That’s why we are committed to giving you excellent healthcare at affordable prices. 

A sport and performance blood test profile costs £105 and this is carried out by our nurse team.

You do not need a referral to book a test but you can book a follow up private GP consultation if you would like to discuss your blood test results with one of our experienced GPs. (Please note this attracts a separate fee).

Book your Sport Performance Blood Test

Booking your sport performance blood test profile is easy, book online, contact us on [email protected] or call our reception team on 0333 9000 010.

We offer sport performance profile blood tests in Wolverhampton and sport performance profile blood tests in Shrewsbury so you can conveniently book around your location and schedule.

Источник: [https://torrent-igruha.org/3551-portal.html]

Sports Fitness Premier Blood Test

Liver, kidney, FBC, This profile is for anyone wanting information about their fitness for sports – either before starting a programme, or to monitor progress during one. It includes all the essential biomarkers that are of interest to a sports person. A full blood count, liver & kidney function, iron levels, ferritin, heart & muscle enzymes, cholesterol profile, inflammation, magnesium, vitamin B12, vitamin D and testosterone.

No. of Biomarkers in Test: 40

Biomarker CategoryNames of Biomarkers
Kidney Function


Urea
Creatinine
eGFR

Gout
Uric Acid

Liver Function
Bilirubin
Alkaline Phosphatase (ALP)
Aspartate Aminotransferase (AST)
Alanine Aminotransferase (ALT)
Gamma-glutamyl Transpeptidase (GGT)

Proteins
Total Protein
Albumin
Globulin

Bone Health 
Calcium

Iron


Iron
Total Iron Binding Capacity
Ferritin

Lipid (cholesterol)
Total Cholesterol
HDL Cholesterol
LDL Cholesterol
Triglycerides
HDL:LDL Cholesterol Ratio

Red Blood Cells
Haemoglobin Levels
Haematocrit (HCT)
Red Cell Count
Mean Cell Volume (MCV)
Mean Cell Haemoglobin (MCH)
Mean Cell Haemoglobin Concentration (MCHC)
Red Cell Distribution Width (RDW)

White Blood Cells
Total White Cell Count
Neutrophils
Lymphocytes
Monocytes
Eosinophils
Basophils

Clotting


Platelet Count
Mean Platelet Volume (MPV)

Minerals


Magnesium

Vitamins


Vitamin B12
Vitamin D

Hormones


Testosterone

This is afinger-pricktest. You will receive a self-testing kit by first class post which will give you full instructions on how to do everything.

Simply put, you will need about 10 drops of blood into two small tubes which you then post back to our partner laboratory using our pre-paid envelope.

Your results will be emailed to you via our secure portal within a day of receiving your sample at the laboratory. The whole process is usually complete within2-3 days– although we do have to depend on royal mail.

All results are reviewed and commented on by our NHS registered GPs but please remember that blood tests alone are never a safe substitute for seeing a doctor directly.  While blood tests can be an essential element of investigating your health, diagnosing a medical condition or starting treatment should always be in consultation with a doctor where your symptoms, history and an examination can be performed.

Источник: [https://torrent-igruha.org/3551-portal.html]

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sports blood test uk

Sport & Performance Blood Test Profile Wolverhampton & Shrewsbury

What do Sport Performance Blood Tests Look for?

We have a dedicated sport and performance blood test profile that examines the following:

  • Full Blood Count
  • Renal Function
  • Liver Function
  • Creatine Kinase
  • Total Protein
  • HbA1c
  • Iron
  • Transferrin
  • Lipids
  • FT4
  • TSH
  • Testosterone
  • Oestradiol

The results for these biomarkers demonstrate how your body is recovering after training, how it is absorbing nutrients, how you are handling stress and tension, and how your metabolism is functioning. All of these aspects are key in creating a training program that is tailored to your needs. Increased CRP could mean you need more rest time between training, or low testosterone levels can be improved by increasing strength training. 

Blood testing can also help you to identify any problems or deficiencies before they stop a sporting career completely. Understanding what your body needs will help you perform at a higher level for longer as well as inform you on staying strong and healthy when your sporting career ends.

What is involved in a Sport Performance Blood Test?

Sport performance blood tests are done by taking a small sample of blood and sending it for testing. When you arrive for your appointment you will be asked a few questions before one of our medical team takes your blood. A thin needle is used to extract blood from a vein in your arm. The sample is labelled and sent to the laboratory for testing and you are free to go.

You may experience slight bruising and discomfort at the needle site, but this will pass within a few days.

Results are sent directly to you as soon as they are ready in a secure and easy to read PDF file. If you would prefer a hard copy of your results please let us know.

How much does it cost?

Although we are a private healthcare provider, our priority is you and your health. That’s why we are committed to giving you excellent healthcare at affordable prices. 

A sport and performance blood test profile costs £105 and this is carried out by our nurse team.

You do not need a referral to book a test but you can book a follow up private GP consultation if you would like sports blood test uk discuss your blood test results with one of our experienced GPs. (Please note this attracts a separate fee).

Book your Sport Performance Blood Test

Booking your sport performance blood test profile is easy, book online, contact us on [email protected] or call our reception team on 0333 9000 010.

We offer sport performance profile blood tests in Wolverhampton and sport performance profile blood tests in Shrewsbury so you can conveniently book around your location and schedule.

Источник: [https://torrent-igruha.org/3551-portal.html]

In a season that never (really) was, talking about an off-season might sound like quite an oxymoron. Still, a handful of lucky few were able to race this year—and even if you weren’t, it’s good practice to follow a typical calendar year so that you don’t lose touch with the natural rhythm of seasons.

One good habit is undoubtedly getting a blood test done at the end of a big training cycle, and/or before you start a new one.

I was among those who raced a full Ironman this year (Estonia, in September). As I do every year in this period, sports blood test uk, before the new sports blood test uk, I did a comprehensive blood test. I wanted to see where my physiological parameters were after a solid year of training (12 to 16 hours per week despite lockdown) and to catch up on potential jones sport shorts coming from that.

However even if I hadn’t raced, I’d still want to get a full picture of my health before embarking on a new season. Whether you’re coming off a period of heavy training or full quarantine lockdown, a blood test can give you valuable information as you set up your next year. 

Type of Tests

Luckily, these days you don’t need to go to a lab or to a doctor to get a blood test. Several companies have now set up at-home testing through a simple finger prick. Purchase the kit online and you get a box delivered at home with all the essentials you’ll need. You then perform the test early in the morning, seal everything, and send it back. You usually get the results in 1-2 days either via email or through an app and an online profile.

Of course, if you prefer to get your blood taken by professionals, that may still be the most accurate and quick way to a result. I have to admit that depending on the provider’s guidelines and some blood clotting issues, it took me three times to have full test results from at-home kits. But that’s not the norm; I may have particularly thick blood (and was probably dehydrated too, particularly early in the morning), and once I changed the finger I was pricking, I was able to solve the issue.

Over the years, I have tried almost all the providers in the UK that advertise at-home kits to endurance athletes: Forth Edge, Thriva, and Medichecks. There are other alternatives in the US, including Everlywell.

Which values should you look at?

Getting your results is one thing. Understanding them is another.

One value to look at is hormones. “These drive adaptations to exercise training, but also haematinics [the nutrients required to produce red blood cells], and vitamin D, particularly in the winter,” says Nicky Keay, sports blood test uk, an endocrinologist specializing in dance and endurance sports (as well as chief medical officer for Forth Edge in the UK.) 

She says that athletes should get blood tests done “to check in on if their endurance training, sports blood test uk, nutrition, and recovery are supporting positive adaptive changes, or not!” She adds that blood tests tell us “how our bodies are responding to external factors of training load, nutrition, and recovery.”

Keats suggests testing three to four times during the season and at critical points like “pre-season, end of the winter training block, in the pre-race season, and the end of a race season.”

In her experience, most of the issues endurance athletes face are due to “low energy availability and potential adverse consequences of relative energy deficiency in sports (REDs)”, she says. She has also written about these issues for Training Peaks, and she says a blood test can pinpoint deficiencies in advance to limit the negative consequences in the long term and support the demands of training and racing.

Values

For about $120, here are the parameters I have had checked. Although the blood test providers will indicate how your test compares to their average levels, I highly recommend running your results by a professional as well. For example, one of my hormone levels was slightly high, but I consulted a professional who told me that since my other significant parameters were average, that single high digit was not a concern. 

Do not fall into the trap of seeing a red light and thinking everything is terrible! Speak to a professional specialized in endurance sports (most of these providers offer this kind of support too).

  • Hematocrit: volume percentage of red blood cells in the blood
  • Hemoglobin: the red protein responsible for transporting oxygen in the blood
  • Red blood cells: necessary oxygen transporters. They take it from the lungs to the cells around the body.
  • White blood cells: the number of white blood cells per volume sports blood test uk blood. White blood cells make up your immune system and help to protect the body against illness and disease.
  • Mean cell hemoglobin: the amount of hemoglobin inside the red blood cells.
  • Mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration: concentration of hemoglobin inside the red blood cells.
  • Mean corpuscular volume: the average size of your red blood cells.
  • Mean platelet volume: the average size of blood platelets (corpuscules who play an essential role in clotting.)
  • Red blood cells distribution width: measurement of the variation of the size of your red blood cells.
  • Cortisol: steroid hormone that is released when the body is under stress. Anxiety, a restricted diet, or over-training can all cause cortisol levels to rise.
  • Follicle-stimulating hormone: regulates the functions of the reproductive system.
  • Luteinizing hormone: plays a vital role in the human reproductive system.
  • Prolactin: a hormone produced by the pituitary gland. Slight increases can occur as part of a stress reaction.
  • Testosterone: a hormone that affects the brain, bone and muscle mass, fat distribution, the vascular system, energy levels, sexual functioning, and fertility. 
  • Thyroid stimulated hormone: plays a vital role in regulating sports blood test uk production of hormones by the thyroid gland.
  • Thyroxine (T4): a test used to check that the thyroid is performing correctly. 
  • A Triiodothyronine (T3): test can indicate if the thyroid is performing correctly.
  • Vitamin B12: like folate, it has a vital role in the production of healthy red blood cells and has a function in nerve health. 
  • Ferritin: the amount of ferritin in the blood reflects the total level of iron stored within your body.
  • Vitamin D: plays an essential role in health, including in the development and preservation of healthy bones, boosting our immune system, muscle function, energy levels, sports blood test uk, and helping to reduce inflammation.
Источник: [https://torrent-igruha.org/3551-portal.html]

Sports science: 3 laboratory tests designed to help you improve your performance

Session complete, sports blood test uk, time for that much-needed warm-down via the Red Lion, sports blood test uk. With red wine to hand – it’s all about the antioxidants these days – you and your tri crew, in unison, download your last 120 minutes of riding to your smartphone for a series of graphs and numbers that tell you sports blood test uk how strong or not you are. Stress score, average power, average speed – this is the sort of tech that’s easily understood by most and, more importantly, sports blood test uk, can result in the necessary training tweaks for improved performance.

How valuable are physiological performance tests for predicting your Ironman potential?

Because ultimately that’s sports blood test uk technology and its integration – or infiltration, depending on your viewpoint – into your triathlon training and racing is all about. The problem is, our sport’s awash with so-called innovations that, once the shine’s worn off, don’t add anything to your swim, bike and run sessions. Your latest £500 outlay’s soon collecting dust with that sit-up machine you bought from the Sunday supplement.

Analysing every ‘innovation’ to hit the market would require an issue that matched War and Peace for length. That’s sports blood test uk we’ve pinpointed the ones we feel have credence behind them – whether scientific or anecdotal – and really hone in on those to help you not only better understand these products, but also make you think a little more deeply about other potentially ground-breaking training tools. Knowledge is power – and power can save you a small fortune!

BLOOD TESTING FOR TRIATHLETES

The Brownlees brothers’ respective careers have seen them jointly or individually rack up Olympic medals, be nominated for BBC Sports Personality of the Year and have a post box painted gold in their honour. From March this year, added to that list was a blood test, the boys working in collaboration with Swedish company Werlabs. “To get through the mental and physical wear and tear of our training it’s vital that we’re in peak condition, both physically and mentally,” Alistair commented at launch. “That’s why together with Werlabs we created this test that looks at over 30 blood values.”

An endurance athlete’s association with blood is nothing new, yet it’s tended to have nefarious associations. The Brownlee test, similar to those from established outfits like Forth Edge, is purely legal, of course, and focuses on biomarkers related to optimum endurance performance like creatine, C-reactive protein and haemoglobin. The test measures the level of each. Take the latter, whose primary role is to transport oxygen around the body. Low levels can signify anaemia, requiring an iron supplement; too high could be dehydration, requiring fluid.

More boxes ticked

The Brownlee test is comprehensive yet, unlike Forth Edge’s Endurance Plus, it doesn’t measure testosterone levels. Arguably that’s a significant omission, especially for athletes training in three disciplines. Over to Dr Will Manger, an expert on the subject. “Low testosterone levels result in a drop in power output and are a sign of overtraining,” he says. “So we’d advise active recovery (e.g. a gentle bike) and relaxation techniques, like deep breathing. And as testosterone’s made up of cholesterol, sports blood test uk, we’d recommend good-quality fats from olive sports blood test uk and fish.” Still, with 34 blood markers analysed, the Brownlees’ blood test ticks more athletic boxes than Forth Edge’s dozen or so.

Choice then comes down to convenience and cost. The Brownlees’ test requires a home visit by a nurse with results sports blood test uk within 24hrs via a secure online journal; Forth Edge deliver a finger-prick sample kit that, once you’ve taken your blood, you send back for analysis. You then get the results via an app within days.

As for cost, the Brownlees’ (werlabs.co.uk) comes in at £139 whereas the Endurance Plus (forthedge.co.uk) is £99. While relatively affordable, they’re both meaningless if you don’t repeat the tests, with Forth Edge recommending every three, four or six months.

Also be aware that blood testing provides only a ‘snapshot’ and that certain factors, such as recent meals, hard training and minor illness, may sports blood test uk results.

HRV TRAINING FOR TRIATHLETES

Another innovative training tool, although one that’s flirted with the masses for a while, is heart-rate variability (HRV). HRV is essentially the time interval between heart beats and is a gauge of your nervous system. It can be measured via a chest strap from Omegawave or credible apps, like HRV4 training, that detect changes in blood volume by placing your finger on your smartphone.

So what are you looking for? Over to Simon Wegerif, founder of HRV training tool ithlete, who we spoke to at the recent Science & Cycling Conference in Nantes, France. “The idea is that small variations in the beat-to-beat timing of the heart reflect the body’s level of stress. Each person has a characteristic amount of variation when they’re well recovered, and the variation decreases when they’re stressed. A daily morning reading is compared to their own baseline and used to determine how recovered they are.”

So if you wake up one morning and your HRV is very low – a sign of stress and potential overtraining – and you planned a high-intensity run session, you may decide to do an active recovery swim session instead. And vice versa. “The great thing about HRV training is that it considers numerous factors that affect sports blood test uk continues Wegerif. “This includes sleep quality, fuelling status and even jetlag.”

OBJECTIVE MEASUREMENT

To maximise HRV training, you need to measure HRV as soon as you awake (and certainly before coffee), and you must take daily readings. The more readings, the more data, the better the results. Also, HRV training works best when used with other ‘ready-to-train’ tools, like the popular Training Peaks and their stress score.

That’s the theory, but what about in the coalface of triathlon? “I’ve used the ithlete app and finger sensor to measure HRV mostly daily for a pump paintball guns vs regular of years,” says age-group triathlete Ian Waters. “This gives you the HRV value as a number and the number is green, amber or red. Green means all is good and carry on as normal; amber means you should lower intensity; and red means you should rest. I started using ithlete because I wanted to push myself as far as possible and have an objective measure to whether I was pushing too hard.”

Waters feels it’s a useful tool, though we question whether not sports blood test uk exactly what you’re going to do that day can result in a seemingly arbitrary training plan? “Not at all,” he replies. “On days I get a red I’ll rest, and usually by the next day it’s back into green.”

Ithlete, Omegawave and HRV Training offer numerous packages with the ithlete app starting from £6.99.

DNA TESTING

Many triathletes delve even deeper by undertaking a DNA test. Muhdo is one of a growing band of companies, including arguably the most well-known DNAFit, offering DNA profiling to maximise your performance via ‘bespoke’ training and nutrition advice. Its potential for ‘customised’ advice holds great appeal with researchers believing the global market for such kits could be worth more than £8billion by 2022.

The idea’s simple. The DNA testing company send you a kit where you take a swab of your mouth, pop it into a test tube and send it back to, say, Muhdo who’ll ‘perform a detailed analysis of your DNA to provide you with personalised fitness recommendations’.

“We test for the nucleobase pairs within a SNP (single nucleotide polymorphism) of a gene,” explains Muhdo’s Chris Collins. “We then examine certain base characteristics that are collated into categories such as stamina, power, VO2 max, etc. We also look at dietary markers.”

These SNPs are the heart of Muhdo and their competitors’ offerings. For every gene there are three possible combinations of SNPs. E.g. with the ACE gene (see below) you can either have II, DD or ID, with each expressing a certain physical and mental characteristic. In the case of the ACE gene, II is linked with endurance capabilities while DD is associated with power.

The ace gene

The likes of Sports blood test uk and DNAFit have isolated genes that, they say, have enough research behind them to influence different parameters of performance, of which they’ll then offer training or nutrition advice. For instance, the gene ACTN3 is associated with power; PPARA regulates fat; and VEGF, blood vessel growth and so endurance. And then there’s that ACE gene, which is involved in blood pressure control and, subsequently, power and endurance.

ACE first came to prominence in 1998 when Professor Hugh Montgomery studied army recruits undergoing basic training. Montgomery showed that subjects with the II combination enjoyed the greatest endurance increases; those with DD the least. So, by virtue, II was linked to endurance performance.

Simple? No. Sports blood test uk geneticist Yannis Pitsiladis took DNA samples from 221 national Kenyan athletes, 70 international Kenyan athletes and 85 members of the general population. The results showed that the II genotype of the ACE gene wasn’t strongly linked with elite endurance status. “Their success isn’t down to favourable genetic characteristics,” argues Pitsiladis. “It’s more tied in with chronic exposure to altitude in combination with moderate-volume, high-intensity training, plus a strong psychological motivation to succeed for economic and social advancement.”

More research required

Pitsiladis feels the field is too immature for commercialisation and more research is required. Then again, there’s recent research like this that adds support to DNA companies: the University of Trieste found that those following dietary advice based on genetic analysis lost 33% more weight than a controlled group.

And, as it stands, nutrition advice based on DNA is arguably more valid than training advice. That’s certainly the experience of age-grouper Waters. “The results from the DNAFit test kit showed low VO2 max potential, high injury risk and slow recovery. None of this matched my experience. Sports blood test uk train twice a day, log 15hrs per week and have rarely missed training because of failure to recover. So I ignored the advice.

“When it came to nutrition, however, it showed carb sensitivity so advised a low-carb diet. It also mentioned an increased need for antioxidants, B and D vitamins and omega-3. I followed the advice, lost a lot of weight, and felt fuelled and ready for each training session.”

Some experts agree there’s more validity in nutrition than training recommendations, with the genetic variations behind a condition like lactose intolerance well-understood. But then there’s unpicking sports blood test uk much impact derives from genes or simple behavioural changes. “I hadn’t struggled to lose weight in the past,” Waters continues, “so I’d no way of knowing whether this was a help or not.”

Advice like increasing omega-3 also feels generic but, argues Collins, this and Pitsiladis’ comments are an easy stick to beat DNA companies with. “Research is building in what’s a fast-moving industry; within just a year, one company could collect 1,000 samples and conduct studies that move the field on.”

As for cost, DNAFit’s Diet & Fitness (dnafit.com) is £249; Muhdo’s (mudho.com) £249.99.

WHAT DOES THE FUTURE HOLD?

Blood testing, DNA analysis and HRV training are a snapshot of the tools that triathletes around the world are using in search of a new personal best. But what of the future? It’s a question we posed to triathlon coach and
author Matt Fitzgerald, but first, elite triathlon coach Tom Bennett.

“Keep an eye out for the emergence of ketones for fuelling endurance performance,” says Bennett. “There’s research that these are superior to carbohydrates in fuelling triathletes.” Ketones differ to ketosis, which
is essentially a high-fat, low-carb diet with the aim of utilising more fat and sparing precious glycogen reserves. Studies show this approach is limiting at higher intensities of exercise. Instead, ketones are a supplement, significantly reducing the time to achieve dietary ketosis – favourable when exercising. Currently, there are two downsides, with cost reported at £2,000 a litre and a very bitter taste.

“In-dwelling sensors beyond heart rate and GPS are also not far away,” Bennett continues, meaning tools that non-invasively measure important determinants of endurance sports blood test uk like muscle glycogen and lactate levels.

As for Fitzgerald, well, his recommendations and concurrent concerns provide the perfect conclusion to our look at integrating tech into your triathlon training. “I recommend specific products and tools to athletes in certain situations, but these are just as likely to be low-tech (e.g. the Sacro-Wedgy for [buttock pain-causing] piriformis syndrome) as high-tech (e.g. the Alter-G anti-gravity treadmill for training through impact-related injuries).

“I like to see a certain degree of penetration within the elite echelon before I support a particular tool,” believes Fitzgerald. “Yet this happens more often with methodologies, like glycogen-depleted sessions, than with technologies. In fact, I spend more time steering athletes away from high-tech gadgets and gimmicks and tamping down the ‘magic-bullet mentality’ that underlies their draw. I’m not anti-technology but most triathletes stand to gain more from focusing on the basics, such as building pain tolerance and body awareness – processes that some technologies directly thwart.”

OTHER CUTTING EDGE TECH TO TRY

Three more innovative ways to refine your tri training and racing

 GOLDEN CHEETAH

An impressive piece of software built archbishop williams hockey people who believe that the data should be freed from manufacturers like Garmin and Polar. As such, you have to download it to your PC or Mac. You’re then given a complete set of power metrics including ‘W Prime’, which essentially quantifies how many matches you’ve burned and was developed by Exeter University’s Dr Phil Skiba. It’s also free.

INSCYD

An extremely smart piece of software that provides a multitude of data including, uniquely, a breakdown of how much energy you get from carbohydrate and fat metabolism. Also records useful measures of performance like anaerobic capacity and economy of movement. Used by Jan Frodeno’s coach Dan Lorang, though currently only of use and availability to coaches and sports scientists.

 ATHOS CLOTHING

For the past couple of years, San Francisco start-up Athos has designed and created fitness clothing that features sensors to reveal extensive muscle and heart-rate data. The data’s then wirelessly transferred to an app on your smartphone.

Источник: [https://torrent-igruha.org/3551-portal.html]

Sports Fitness Premier Blood Test

Liver, kidney, FBC, This profile is for anyone wanting information about their fitness for sports – either before starting a programme, or to monitor progress during one. It includes all the essential biomarkers that are of interest to a sports person. A full blood count, liver & kidney function, iron levels, ferritin, heart & muscle enzymes, cholesterol profile, inflammation, magnesium, vitamin B12, vitamin D and testosterone.

No. of Biomarkers in Test: 40

Biomarker CategoryNames of Biomarkers
Kidney Function


Urea
Creatinine
eGFR

Gout
Uric Acid

Liver Function
Bilirubin
Alkaline Phosphatase (ALP)
Aspartate Aminotransferase (AST)
Alanine Aminotransferase (ALT)
Gamma-glutamyl Transpeptidase (GGT)

Proteins
Total Protein
Albumin
Globulin

Bone Health 
Calcium

Iron


Iron
Total Iron Binding Capacity
Ferritin

Lipid (cholesterol)
Total Cholesterol
HDL Cholesterol
LDL Cholesterol
Triglycerides
HDL:LDL Cholesterol Ratio

Red Blood Cells
Haemoglobin Levels
Haematocrit (HCT)
Red Cell Count
Mean Cell Volume (MCV)
Mean Cell Haemoglobin (MCH)
Mean Cell Haemoglobin Concentration (MCHC)
Red Cell Distribution Width (RDW)

White Blood Cells
Total White Cell Count
Neutrophils
Lymphocytes
Monocytes
Eosinophils
Basophils

Clotting


Platelet Count
Mean Platelet Volume (MPV)

Minerals


Magnesium

Vitamins


Vitamin B12
Vitamin D

Hormones


Testosterone

This is afinger-pricktest. You will receive a self-testing kit by first class post which will give you full instructions on how to do everything.

Simply put, you will need about 10 drops of blood into two small tubes which you then post back to our partner laboratory using our pre-paid envelope.

Your results will be emailed to you via our secure portal within a day of sports blood test uk your sample at the laboratory. The whole process is sports blood test uk complete within2-3 days– although we do have to depend on royal mail.

All results are reviewed and commented on by our NHS registered GPs but please remember that blood tests alone are never a safe substitute for seeing a doctor directly.  While blood tests can be an essential element of investigating your health, diagnosing a medical condition or starting treatment should always be in consultation with a doctor where your symptoms, history and an examination can be performed.

Источник: [https://torrent-igruha.org/3551-portal.html]

Blood Biomarker Profiling and Monitoring for High-Performance Physiology and Nutrition: Current Perspectives, Limitations and Recommendations

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