Yale fall lacrosse tournament 2016

yale fall lacrosse tournament 2016

In Fall 2016, we began a collaboration with the Yale Daily News, entitled ”BY down the numbers in advance of the Ivy League Lacrosse tournaments in NYC. 2015 Liberty Bell Challenge Sweetlax 2016 Champion 2015 Liberty Bell Challenge Sweetlax 2020 2014 Harvard Crimson Classic Youth Sweetlax 2019 Team 2-0. PROVIDENCE, R.I. – The Harvard men's lacrosse team (8-8, 7/6 Yale (13-2, 5-1 Ivy) in the Ivy League Tournament championship game Sunday.

Yale fall lacrosse tournament 2016 - congratulate

Men's Lacrosse Falls to Yale in Ivy Tournament Final, 14-9

For the second time in as many weeks, the Harvard men’s lacrosse team found itself locked in a tight battle with conference rivals No. 7/6 Yale. And for the second straight time, it was the Bulldogs who dominated the fourth quarter, ending the game on a big run to secure the win.

Two Saturdays ago, Yale junior midfielder Eric Scott took over the contest, scoring or assisting on four goals in the final quarter to lead his team to a 9-8, comeback win. This past Sunday, with the stakes raised as the two squads battled in the Ivy League tournament final, it was sophomore attacker Ben Reeves who stepped up.

Reeves, four days after being named a First Team All-Ivy selection, did not score in the fourth, but had two key assists to help the Bulldogs crack open a one-goal game and pull away. The Crimson had closed the gap to 10-9 with 12:54 remaining, but with his composed decision-making and field vision, Reeves guided his team to the tourney title.

“He’s a really dynamic attackman,” Harvard co-captain and defender Stephen Jahelka said. “His ability to dodge to score and also pass put a lot of pressure on our defense. Yale did an impressive job on capitalizing off of his feeds and generated a lot of offense that way.”

Yale (13-2, 5-1 Ivy) ultimately pushed the lead up to 14-9 to capture the Ivy League’s automatic bid to the NCAA Tournament. The Crimson (8-8, 3-3 Ivy) never fell behind by more than two goals until late in the fourth quarter, but could not carry the momentum from its upset win over No. 2/2 Brown to another marquee victory over the Bulldogs.

“Our guys left it all on the field today,” Crimson coach Chris Wojcik ’96 said. “There’s really not much else I could have asked for out of them. We just didn’t make the plays when it counted.”

En route to their third straight conference tournament title, the Bulldogs started strong, racing out to a 3-1 lead within seven minutes of the first whistle. Harvard battled back to tie the game at 4-4, and the advantage continued to shift back and forth throughout the first half.

Reeves put his big-play ability on display right from the start, tallying the opening score. He had two goals and two assists by halftime, before having an even better second half and finishing with game highs of four goals and five assists.

Yale senior midfielder Michael Keasey, another First Team All-Ivy selection, also played a big role in the first 30 minutes with a hat trick. His goal as time expired in the second quarter sent his team into halftime with a 7-6 lead and all of the momentum on its side.

The Crimson continued to battle as the game went on, however, hitting back with goals every time the Bulldogs threatened to pull away in the third quarter. Unlike on Friday, when the team rode a career night from sophomore attacker Morgan Cheek, the struggle against Yale was a team effort.

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“We aren’t one player, obviously, and quite a few different guys contributed today,” Wojcik said. “That’s what we expect though, for everyone to show up, whether on the score sheet or not.”

Seven players found the back of the net for Harvard, and six got on the score sheet for assists. Senior attacker Devin Dwyer led his side with two apiece for a total of four points, and it was his goal with 13:37 left in the third quarter that tied the game.

Yale hit back through Reeves, and never trailed again. Despite three man-up opportunities in the fourth quarter, the Crimson could not maintain enough possession to keep the game close.

“In the fourth quarter, they won some key faceoffs and took advantage of some sloppy clears and ball handling,” Jahelka said. “As in the first game, they were very deliberate in their offense, which took time off the clock and also usually ended with points on the board.”

—Staff writer George Hu can be reached at yianshenhu@college.harvard.edu.

Источник: [https://torrent-igruha.org/3551-portal.html]

Tournament Central
Box Scores: Game 1 Semifinal Game 2

Our greatest assets are our coaches...

Maureen Spellman:

Maureen Spellman enters her first season as head coach at Endicott College's, taking over a program that is coming off their 10th Commonwealth Coast Conference (CCC) championship-winning season this past spring. Spellman began her coaching career after graduating in 2012 from the University of New Haven with a Bachelor of Arts degree in psychology. She joined NCAA Division II’s Southern Connecticut State as an assistant coach the following year while also coaching the Nor’easter Lacrosse Club. Spellman took the helm of SCSU’s women’s lacrosse program in the 2013-14 academic year where she oversaw all aspects of team operations including student-athlete recruitment, scheduling, team operations, and academic success. During Spellman’s tenure at SCSU concluded with 16 student-athletes achieving NE-10 Conference Commissioner’s Honor Roll for maintaining at least a 3.0 cumulative GPA. The entire team earned an IWLCA Team Academic Award for the second consecutive season while three individuals were placed on the IWLCA All-Academic Team. Spellman was a four-year goalie and two-time captain New Haven where she holds the program record for career wins (46) and saves (636) as well as numerous single season and individual game highs. Her standout play as a student-athlete from 2009-12 resulted in numerous postseason athletic accolades including three Intercollegiate Women’s Lacrosse Coaches Association (IWLCA) All-North Region Second Team awards. Additionally, Spellman was a three-time Northeast-10 (NE-10) All-Conference honoree where in 2009, as a freshman, she was named NE-10 Conference Goalie of the Year and Rookie of the Year with a First Team All-Conference nod.

Betsy Vendel:

Betsy Vendel is in her third season with the Southern Connecticut State women's lacrosse program in the 2017-18 academic year and was named as the team's Interim Head Coach in the fall of 2017. She was a four-year member of the squad at Central Connecticut State, a career that was capped by earning the Gail Rutz Award as the school’s Outstanding Female Athlete. She was a three-time All-Conference selection and the Northeast Conference Rookie of the Year as a freshman. Prior, she was a four-year member of the squad at Central Connecticut State, a career that was capped by earning the Gail Rutz Award as the school's Outstanding Female Athlete. A native of CT, Vendel led Newtown High to SWC Championship for four straight years and in 2009 was named Most Valuable Player of SWC Championship Game. She was a two-time All-SWC honoree and twice earned Connecticut Division 1 All-State honors. Vendel was named Connecticut Post Player of the Year in 2009 and left Newtown High with the record for career points. Vendel continued that success at CCSU earning Rookie of the Year honors during her freshman year and following that with Second Team All-NEC honors her sophomore year. She was a three-time All-Conference selection and the Northeast Conference Rookie of the Year as a freshman. Vendel holds the school record for career points at 186 points, the school record for career Assists at 99 and the school record for career draw controls at 174.

ANNE MURRAY:

Anne Murray was named the Associate Head Coach of Fairfield Women’s Lacrosse in July of 2017. Murray most recently coached at her alma mater, Princeton University, where she helped guide the Tigers to an NCAA postseason appearance in each of her five campaigns in New Jersey. Murray has been a member of Chris Sailer's coaching staff since 2013 as the Tigers claimed four Ivy League Regular Season Championships and two Ivy League Tournament Championships in that span. Princeton's five NCAA postseason berths from 2013-17 included three trips to the Second Round and two appearances in the National Quarterfinals as the Tigers compiled a total of 64 wins with Murray on the sidelines. Before venturing back to Old Nassau, Murray garnered Division I coaching experience at Mount St. Mary's, Virginia Tech and Rutgers. As a student-athlete at Princeton, Murray took the field for 51 games on attack. The Tigers earned a berth in the NCAA Championship in all four of those seasons, highlighted by three appearances in the National Quarterfinals. Murray earned a bachelor's degree in history from Princeton in 2009. Murray joins a Fairfield squad that went 12-6 overall in 2017 – the ninth time in the past 10 campaigns that the Stags tallied 10 or more wins. The Stags posted a 7-1 MAAC record and advanced to their eighth MAAC Championship Game. Fairfield is slated to return seven starters and 23 total student-athletes for the upcoming 2018 season.

Megan Cersosimo:

Megan Cersosimo was a four-year letter winner for the University of Connecticut. She was named All-BIG EAST second team as a senior and to the North Regional All-American Team and she won the UConn Club Award for Outstanding Senior Athlete in 2001. Megan was a captain in her junior and seniors years and left as the school career record holder in games started, ground balls and draw controls. Cersosimo was a 4 year letter winner in soccer and lacrosse at Great Valley HS in Malvern, PA. Her extensive coaching experience includes being an assistant Coach at UCONN from 2001 to 2006, the head coach at UCONN from 2006 to 2008 after which she became, and remains, the head coach at Conard High School. Megan was named the Class L Coach of the Year in 2015 and US Lacrosse Coach of the Year in 2017.

Megan Borman:

Megan Murphy Borman began coaching the Loomis Chaffee varsity girls lacrosse team in the spring of 2015. In Megan’s first season at the helm, the team won the Founders League and the Western New England championships. In 2016, the team had a perfect season with a record of 17-0, and Megan and co-coach Clarissa Clarke were named 2016 U.S. Lacrosse Connecticut High School Lacrosse Coach of the Year. Megan spent four years as the head coach of the Weston (Conn.) High School girls lacrosse program. Over her tenure at Weston, Megan coached the team to two Class S State Championships (2011, 2013) and the best season in program history in 2013 (21-1). Megan also was named 2011 Class S Coach of the Year and 2013 CT Post’s All-Region Girls Lacrosse Coach of the Year. Megan graduated in 2003 from Gettysburg College with a degree in history. She was a member of the Gettysburg women’s lacrosse team and was named a two-time IWLCA National All-American, three-time Regional All-American, three-time All-Conference player, Conference Player of the Year, and Offensive Player of the Year by Inside Lacrosse Magazine. Megan was inducted into Hall of Athletic Honor for Women’s Lacrosse in 2014 at Gettysburg College.

Emily Knapp:

Emily Knapp joins the Wesleyan University Cardinals for the 2017 - 2018 season. Knapp joins the Cardinals after graduating from the University of Colorado in May. She was a four-year member for the Buffaloes, playing attack and midfield at the Division I level. The 2014 campaign – Knapp's first with the Buffaloes – was the inaugural season for the Colorado women's lacrosse program as it finished 11-8 overall. The team posted a winning record in each of its first four seasons, which was capped off by a NCAA Tournament appearance this past spring as the Buffaloes finished 16-4 overall. Knapp – a New Jersey native – appeared in four games each season, and registered four goals and one assist for five career points. 

Kevin Siedlecki:

Kevin Siedlicki is in his second year as an assistant coach with the Southern Connecticut State women's lacrosse program in 2017-18. Siedlecki has been the head coach of Daniel Hand High School since 2009, where he has compiled a record of 103-41. Before that, he was assistant coach at Bethlehem Central, in New York. n seven seasons, he has led the Tigers to five SCC regular-season championships and three SCC tournament championships. Under Siedlecki, the Tigers have been to the Class M State Championship game twice. He was named New Haven Register Coach of the Year in 2011, and Southern Connecticut Conference Coach of the Year and CIAC Class M Coach of the Year in 2015, after the Tigers accomplished the best record in program history at 20-2. From the Daniel Hand program, athletes have gone on to play at all levels of collegiate lacrosse, from startup club programs to highly competitive Division I schools. Kevin is also an English teacher at Daniel Hand High School, where he graduated in 2002. He holds two bachelor's degrees from Union College, one in English and one in Music, and an MS in English from Southern Connecticut State. 

DAN WARBURTON:

Dan Warburton has been the head coach at Cheshire High School since 2002. During his time at Cheshire, he has compiled a record of 202-76-3. In fourteen seasons, Warburton has led the Rams to seven SCC regular season championships and six SCC tournament championships. In 2012, Warburton led Cheshire to a 20-3 record and the Class L State Championship game. The Rams have also made three Class L Semi-Final games during his tenure. Warburton was named Connecticut Class L Coach of the Year in 2011 and New Haven Register Coach of the Year in 2004 and 2012. Cheshire lacrosse players are well represented in the collegiate game, playing at many levels. Former players have been recognized as captains of their collegiate teams, and been honored with awards such as conference rookie of the year and collegiate All-American. Dan Warburton has been a teacher in the Technology Education department at Cheshire High School for the past 16 years. He holds a Bachelor's and Master's degree in Technology Education, as well as a second Master's degree in Educational Technology from Central Connecticut State University. Warburton also has a 6th-Year degree in Educational Leadership from Sacred Heart University.

JORDAN CHRISTOPHER:

Jordan Christopher is in her third season as an assistant coach at Quinnipiac in 2017. Christopher previously served as an assistant for Kotowicz at Central Connecticut State University from 2014 through the 2016 season. Christopher was part of the CCSU coaching staff that developed two All-Northeast Conference First Team and five All-NEC Second Team selections, as well as two All-Rookie Team honorees from 2014 through 2016. Under Christopher’s guidance, CCSU featured 13 NEC Spring Academic Honor Roll members as well as eight Travelers Athletic Directors All-Academic Team selections. In addition to posting the highest cumulative grade-point average in program history, the Blue Devils were also named a IWLCA Division I Academic Honor Squad in 2015 and 2016. In addition to her role at Central Connecticut State, Christopher also served as the head coach with the Philly Blast Lacrosse Club team from 2012 to 2014 and the Nor’easter Lacrosse Club team from 2014 to the present. A four-year letter winner at UConn, Christopher was a two-time captain in 2013 and 2014. A BIG EAST All-Academic selection, she also served on the Women’s Lacrosse Leadership Council in 2011 and 2012. In 2013, she was also part of the first team in UConn women’s lacrosse history to advance to the NCAA Tournament.

Emily Anderson:

Emily Anderson is welcomed to Hamden Hall Country Day School as Head Coach of the women's lacrosse program. Prior, Anderson, midfielder with the UConn Women’s Lacrosse Program appeared in all 16 games as a freshman. Additionally, Anderson led all freshmen with eight points on seven goals and one assist to go with 20 draw controls. She notched three goals against No. 18 Boston College (March 2) and tallied two goals and three draw controls against Sacred Heart (March 16). Prior to UConn, she earned an Honorable Mention All-American by U.S. Lacrosse, she was tabbed All-State three times in her high school career. Anderson was named First Team All-Conference, team MVP and New Haven Register All-Area three times. She finished her career as the school record holder with 245 goals and being named Academic All-American, she led her senior squad to an undefeated conference championship. Anderson graduated in the top-10 in her high school class and was a member of the National Honor Society.

DANIELLE TAMMARO:

Danielle Tammaro currently serves as Head Coach of the Pomperaug women's lacrosse program. In 2017, she guided the Pomperaug program to earning the runner-up position in the Class M division. A 2010 graduate from Southern Connecticut State University with a degree in Exercise Science, Tammaro was a four year starter on the women's Lacrosse team. During her career as a Owl, she lead the team in ground ball pick ups as well as caused turnovers. She was honored with student-athlete achievement awards for three consecutive years and served as team captain her senior year. Upon graduation, in 2010, Tammaro began working as a Physical Education teacher within Region 15 Schools and earned an M.S. in Human Nutrition from the University of New Haven. Tammaro, a 2006 graduate from Cheshire High School, has gained coaching experience by working with Daniel Hand High School and various camps and clinics across the state.  Tammaro is entering her first year as the head girls' lacrosse coach at Pomperaug High School.

COURTNEY DESTEFANO:

Courtney DeStefano, 2009 graduate of Skidmore College in Saratoga Springs, NY. DeStefano was a four-year member of the varsity women’s team and a three year starting goalkeeper for the Thoroughbreds. DeStefano won Liberty-League All-Academic honors in each of her four years at Skidmore and participated in the Liberty League semi-final championship as a first-year player. DeStefano played four years on the Moses Brown School (Providence, RI) varsity squad, captaining the team as a senior. She earned First Team All-State honors her junior year and Second Team All-State honors as a senior. DeStefano is currently the head coach for the girls varsity lacrosse program at Choate Rosemary Hall in Wallingford, CT. 

Taylor Moreau:

Taylor, a 2015 graduate of CCSU played 2 years D1 lacrosse at Winthrop University in South Carolina in the Big South conference and 1 season at CCSU. Her senior year she studied abroad in Africa, Australia and New Zealand. Taylor graduated from Glastonbury High in 2011, a 4 year varsity field hockey starter, 2 year captain and State Championship team member. She played 4 years varsity lacrosse, was a captain, all conference, first team all state and one of Hartford Courant's top attackers. She was a varsity assistant coach for GHS in 2014, the team made the state championship. She has coached at various camps and this is her 3rd year with Nor'easter. 

Riley Smith:

Riley Smith joins the Wesleyan coaching staff in 2018 after graduating from Fairfield University in May 2017 with a Bachelor of Science in Biology. Smith, a Guilford, Conn. native, played four years for the Stags as a midfielder and appeared in 20 games throughout her career. Smith also has years of coaching experience, in addition to her playing days, and has served as a head coach (goalies and field players) and recruiting coordinator for the Nor'easter Premier Lacrosse Club in New Haven, Conn. since 2013. Smith also served as the head junior varsity coach and assistant varsity coach at Saint Josephs High School in Trumbull, Conn. since 2016.

Kara McHugh:

Joined the Fairfield University Stags Coaching staff for the 2017/2018 season. A Marist College graduate, class of 2016 from Madison CT. McHugh played midfield in high school and college. She went on to be one of just three players in program history to reach 100 points and 100 draw controls in her career.  McHugh, a two time All-MAAC First Team selection, two time All-MAAC All Academic Team selection, and All MAAC Second Team selection. In her career, McHugh ranks seventh in goals, tied for ninth in assists, eighth in points, fourth in draw controls, and third in caused turnovers, and ranks eighth in single-season draw controls.

Julie Wadland:

A 2010 graduate of Dartmouth College, Julie was a two-time captain and All-Ivy League First Team selection for the Big Green. A goalie, she earned IWLCA All-American honors in 2010 and played for the U.S. National Team from 2008 to 2010. Prior to Loomis, Wadland was a volunteer assistant coach for Dartmouth while she worked toward her master’s degree. Wadland spent the summer of 2016 playing for the Boston Storm, one of four teams competing in the inaugural season of the semi-professional United Women’s Lacrosse League (UWLX). As a high school student, Wadland was a three-sport captain in soccer, ice hockey, and lacrosse at Phillips Andover Academy.

ALEXA FOLDY:

Alexa Foldy played lacrosse at Brookfield high school and was all conference. Foldy played two years of Nor’easter Lacrosse and then played lacrosse at Eastern Connecticut State University, where she started all four years. She’s been coaching the JV lacrosse team for the past three years at Joel Barlow high school.

CAITLIN O'BRIEN:

Caitlin O'Brien is a 2017 graduate from the University of New Haven where she played Division II lacrosse all four years and served as a captain her senior season. At UNH, O'Brien was IWLCA third team All-North Region, NE-10 All-Conference second team, and was named to the 2017 DII IWLCA Senior All-Star team representing the North Region. Before New Haven, she graduated from Branford, where she played varsity lacrosse, field hockey, and ice hockey all four years. O'Brien currently coaches at Branford High School as a varsity lacrosse assistant coach. This is her 5th year coaching with Nor'easter, but she has been apart of the program since 6th grade.

CAROLYNN KEAL:

Carolynn Keal will begin her fourth year coaching with Nor’Easter this summer. After playing for the club throughout high school she wanted to continue to be apart of such an amazing program. She has recently graduated from Southern Connecticut State University with a Bachelors of Science in Biology with a concentration in Secondary Education. While at SCSU she was a four year starter and two year captain. In addition she set the career high for assists, ground balls and caused turnovers. During her freshman year she was selected as a member of the Northeast 10 All Rookie Team. She was a multiple time Northeast 10 Commissioners Honor Roll selection. As a midfielder she can see the field from both an offensive and defensive perspective. 

SHELBY LAPOCE:

Shelby Iapoce is a 2016 graduate of Fairfield University, where she was a four-year starting defender for the Stags. During her career, she helped the Stags win 45 games, which earned them spots in the MAAC Final Four in 2013, 2014, 2015, and 2016, along with 1 Regular Season MAAC Championship in 2014, 1 MAAC Championship in 2015, and 1 NCAA Tournament appearance in 2015. She was named the IWLCA Division 1 Community Awareness Award Winner, and Fairfield University's William Wallin Memorial Award Winner in 2016, for her volunteer efforts, including starting Fairfield's Military Appreciation Day, in which she helped raise $20,000 within the first 3 years of its inception, and for being a member of the Student Athlete Advisory Committee. Iapoce was also named to the All MAAC Rookie Team in 2013, the All MAAC Academic Team in 2014, 2015 and 2016, and the IWLCA Division 1 Academic Honor Roll in 2015 and 2016. She was also a member of Fairfield's Dean's List, earning a major in Accounting and a Minor in Studio Art. Along with coaching for Albany Elite Lacrosse, she also helped coach for Guilderland Youth Lacrosse and Fairfield Youth Lacrosse during her high school and collegiate career. She is also a 200 Hour Certified Yoga Instructor. Iapoce is a graduate of Guilderland High School, in Guilderland, NY, where she was named an Honorable Mention All-American, Academic All-American, MVP, and First Team All Star. She also lettered in soccer. 

EMMY JEDNOROWICZ:

AVERY GIORGIO:

ALICIA MORTALI:

GRACE MCCANN:

Grace McCann, a 2017 graduate from Wesleyan University, earned NESCAC All-Academic honors and was named to the IWLCA honor roll. McCann was the starting goalie for the Wesleyan University varsity program that won a Little Three Championship and competed in the NCAA Tournament for the first time in program history. At Wesleyan, McCann studied Neuroscience and Behavior. Prior to college, McCann played goalie at Simsbury High School and earned All-Conference honors. McCann now coaches for the Simsbury Youth Lacrosse program and joins the Nor'easter squad for another season!

MARISSA MCDERMOTT (NOR'EASTER GOALIE COACH):

Источник: [https://torrent-igruha.org/3551-portal.html]

MEN’S LACROSSE: Navy upsets Yale, knocks Bulldogs out of NCAA tournament

Courtesy of Yale Athletics

A historic Yale men’s lacrosse season this year included a No. 1 national ranking at one point, an Ivy League tournament title and the team’s first NCAA tournament home game since 1990. But after an upset loss this weekend, an NCAA tournament win will remain noticeably absent from the Bulldogs’ 2016 list of achievements.

The No. 4-seeded Bulldogs (13–3, 5–1 Ivy) fell 13–10 to Navy at home on Sunday, leaving the tournament early with their first loss to a team outside of the national top 10 this year. Despite outshooting the Midshipmen 39–34 and picking up seven more ground balls than its opponent, Yale came up empty-handed as Navy’s previously struggling offense came to life and goalie John Connor saved 12 Yale shots.

“I give [Navy] a lot of credit,” Yale head coach Andy Shay said. “They struggled [at the end of the regular season], and it’s not often you take two weeks off and come back the way they did. It was a huge challenge for us, and we came out on the short end of it. I’m sure [Navy players are] pleased with their effort, and they should be.”

The 3,526 fans in attendance, marking the most at Reese Stadium since Yale played Princeton in the 1990 NCAA tournament, saw an incredible display of grit, as captain and defender Michael Quinn ’16, who tore his ACL three weeks ago against Albany and told the News the following week he was out for the season, played nearly 50 minutes of the game.

 

Despite having Quinn for the first time in four games, the Bulldogs had little answer for the Navy offense, which had not scored more than five goals in its last three games but scored 13 on Sunday, tying the Midshipmen’s second-highest total of the season.

“Coach Sowell and [assistant] coach [Michael] Phipps really got us back to being ourselves and get back to the things that we had gotten away from,” Navy captain and attackman Patrick Keena said.

Navy looked rusty after its two-week break in the first quarter. Attackman Jack Tigh ’19 scored the first two goals for the Bulldogs, which were both assisted by attackman Ben Reeves ’18. Tigh would finish the day with a career-high three goals.

Later in the quarter, Reeves and midfielder Jason Alessi ’18 found the back of the net to give Yale a 4–1 lead with 6:50 remaining in the first quarter.

However, Navy eventually found its grove and scored the next four goals of the game to take a 5–4 lead. Two of those goals came from midfielder Casey Rees, who led all players on Saturday with four goals.

Yale goals from attackman Jeff Cimbalista ’17 and midfielder Will Robinson ’18 gave the Bulldogs their last lead of the game at 6–5, and the teams went into halftime tied at seven.

Navy outscored Yale 5–3 in the second quarter largely because of success at the faceoff X, which would prove to be a theme of the game. Behind faceoff man Brady Dove, whom Shay described as an “absolute bull” and a “warrior”, the Midshipmen won seven of nine faceoffs in the quarter, and they finished the day capturing 62 percent of the draws.

“A lot of our offensive success has to do with how much we have possession,” Navy head coach Rick Sowell.

Although Navy scored two goals within the first six minutes of the second half, the most prominent highlight of the third quarter was the effort of the Navy defense, and in particular, its anchor in net. Connors made six saves in the quarter, as many as Yale goalie Hoyt Crance ’19 would make in the entire game.

Connors, a senior, finished the day with 12 saves in one of the biggest games of his collegiate career. But when asked if it was the best game of his career, he was quick to note that while he played a great second half, he let in several goals he thought he should have saved in the first 30 minutes.

Connors and Sowell also credited the defense for limiting Yale’s inside shots. Whatever the cause, the Bulldogs scored just once in the third quarter and entered the final 15 minutes trailing 9–8.

Keena tallied the first goal of the fourth quarter, capping a two-goal and four-assist performance, before the Bulldogs were set back in another way a few minutes later.

With about 10 minutes remaining in the final quarter, Quinn’s injured knee finally gave out, and he immediately hobbled to the sideline in conspicuous pain. Not only did Quinn pick up two ground balls and force a turnover in his 50 minutes of action, he also inspired his teammates by playing on the injury.

“He did it for Yale,” Shay said. “He’s just such an impressive leader. I’m really proud to be associated with that kid. When he went down against Albany, it really affected our guys emotionally. Just to have him there as a presence was huge.”

YaleLacrosse5
Quinn, number 44, played most of the game in a knee brace and wrap before falling to the ground and leaving the game in the fourth quarter. (Courtesy of Yale Athletics)

The teams traded goals before Reeves scored to tighten the score to 11–10 with 6:54 remaining. Reeves finished the game with three goals and three assists and, on the same day, was named one of five finalists for the Tewaaraton Award, college lacrosse’s Heisman Trophy for the most outstanding player. In the award’s 16-year history, Reeves is the first Bulldog to be named a finalist.

However, Reeves and the offense could not bring the Bulldogs back, as Navy scored the final two goals of the game and escaped with a 13–10 victory.

“I won’t deny that [this win] does mean a lot, and I’m so happy I can go with [this senior class],” Sowell said. “They came in at a low point, and just to see the program come from where it did and where we’re at now, it took a lot of hard work. We get to be together another week and get to put the jerseys on one more time.”

Navy will face No. 5 seeded Brown in the quarterfinals next week. No. 1 seeded Maryland, who Yale beat 8–5 in February, beat Quinnipiac 13–6 in other NCAA tournament action.

MATTHEW MISTER

Источник: [https://torrent-igruha.org/3551-portal.html]

MEN’S LACROSSE: Yale wins Ivy League tournament, earns national No. 4 seed

At the beginning of the 2016 season, seniors on the Yale men’s lacrosse team said their performance in May would define the year. Just two games into the season’s final month, the Bulldogs now have both a championship and a top-five national seeding to show for it.

Yale (13–2, 5–1 Ivy) captured its fourth Ivy League tournament championship in the last five years this weekend after defeating Penn 7–6 in the semifinal and Harvard 14–9 in the final. The victories, along with a nearly perfect regular season that included a signature win over current top seed Maryland in February, earned Yale the No. 4 seed in the 16-team NCAA tournament and a Sunday matchup against Navy in the first round. The Bulldogs will play the Midshipmen at Reese Stadium at 5:15 p.m., marking their first NCAA tournament home game since 1990.

Playing two familiar foes in the conference tournament, which was hosted by Brown, Yale proved it could play multiple styles of lacrosse. The Bulldogs ground out a victory in a defensive battle against Penn (8–7, 4–2) on Friday and powered past Harvard (8–8, 3–3) on Sunday in an offensive explosion led by attackman Ben Reeves ’18, who scored four goals and tallied five assists on Sunday on the way to being named the Most Outstanding Player of the tournament.

“It’s very surreal, and [winning the Ivy League] has been one of our goals since day one as a team,” attackman Jack Tigh ’19 said. “It feels great to celebrate with all my teammates.”

However, the title was never a given for the Bulldogs. While Yale only trailed Penn for a little over a minute in the second quarter, the semifinal contest was tied for almost the entire fourth quarter until Reeves scored his third goal of the game on an extra-man laser into the top corner with 3:43 remaining. Yale’s defense closed out the game, preventing the Quakers from getting any quality looks on cage.

The semifinal was close in all facets of the game, with Penn barely outshooting Yale 33–31 and grabbing just one more ground ball than the Bulldogs. Yale goalie Hoyt Crance ’19 matched Penn’s Reed Junkin, who was recently named the Ivy League Co-Rookie of the Year, with 10 saves apiece.

In the second semifinal, Harvard handed then-No. 2 Brown its second loss of the season, forcing a No. 5 overall seed for the Bears in the national tournament. Although Ivy League Player of the Year Dylan Molloy scored five goals for Brown in the 13–12 loss, Harvard attackman Morgan Cheek put up the performance of the tournament, scoring nine goals on the night. Harvard goalie Robert Shaw made 15 saves to slow down Brown’s lethal attack, which tallied 14 goals against the Bulldogs in April.

Yale jumped out early in Sunday’s final, a rematch of the regular season finale eight days prior, as Reeves, midfielder Jason Alessi ’18 and attackman Jeff Cimbalista ’17 gave the Bulldogs a 3–1 lead early. However, Harvard quickly bounced back to tie the game at four late in the first quarter.

Reeves scored 46 seconds into the second quarter, but Harvard tied the game with a rare own goal by the Bulldogs off a chaotic scrum for a ground ball, though the score was eventually credited to Harvard attackman Devin Dwyer. Cheek gave the Crimson its first and only lead of the day with 11:52 to play in the quarter before Yale midfielder Michael Keasey ’16 closed out the half with two-straight goals, including one in which he ran the length of the field and sniped the net from afar as time expired.

Although Dwyer would tie the game at seven shortly after halftime, the Elis began to assert their will in the second half as Yale’s dominance in faceoffs and ground balls proved to be too much for the Crimson. The Bulldogs won 17 of 25 faceoffs on the day and scooped up 40 ground balls compared to just 24 for Harvard.

Reeves scored his third goal of the game before assisting Cimbalista on his second of the contest. A Crimson strike from Dwyer and Reeves’ fourth goal put the score at 10–8 entering the fourth quarter.

Attackman Joe Lang brought Harvard within one, but Keasey then scored the first of four straight goals by the Yale offense to close out the game.

The Bulldogs move on to host Navy (10–4, 7–1 Patriot) on Sunday, hoping to advance to the tournament quarterfinals for the first time since defeating Penn State in the 2013 first round. If Yale wins, it will face the winner of Brown and Johns Hopkins, a matchup in which Brown is favored.

“I definitely think winning this is good momentum for us going into the NCAA tournament, but now the stakes are much higher,” said midfielder Mike Bonacci ’16, who scored in the fourth quarter. “It is single elimination, so now is when we have to play like each game could be our last. I’m excited for what is to come but we have a lot of work ahead of us.”

Yale and Navy last faced off in the 1992 NCAA tournament first round, with the Bulldogs prevailing 9–3 before falling 17–8 to Syracuse. Navy has lost two of its last three games entering the NCAA tournament contest.

MATTHEW MISTER

Источник: [https://torrent-igruha.org/3551-portal.html]

Our greatest assets are our coaches.

Maureen Spellman:

Maureen Spellman enters her first season as head coach at Endicott College's, taking over a program that is coming off their 10th Commonwealth Coast Conference (CCC) championship-winning season this past spring. Spellman began her coaching career after graduating in 2012 from the University of New Haven with a Bachelor of Arts degree in psychology, yale fall lacrosse tournament 2016. She joined NCAA Division II’s Southern Connecticut State as an assistant coach the following year while also coaching the Nor’easter Lacrosse Club. Spellman took the helm of SCSU’s women’s lacrosse program in the 2013-14 academic year where she oversaw all aspects of team operations including student-athlete recruitment, scheduling, team operations, and academic success. During Spellman’s tenure at SCSU concluded with 16 student-athletes achieving Yale fall lacrosse tournament 2016 Conference Commissioner’s Honor Roll for maintaining at least a 3.0 cumulative GPA. The entire team earned an IWLCA Team Academic Award for the second consecutive season while three individuals were placed on the IWLCA All-Academic Team. Spellman was a four-year goalie and two-time captain New Haven where she holds the program record for career wins (46) and saves (636) as well as numerous single season and individual game highs. Her standout play as a student-athlete from 2009-12 resulted in numerous postseason athletic accolades including three Intercollegiate Women’s Lacrosse Coaches Association (IWLCA) All-North Region Second Team awards. Additionally, Spellman was a three-time Northeast-10 (NE-10) All-Conference honoree where in 2009, as a freshman, she was named NE-10 Conference Goalie of the Year and Rookie of the Year with yale fall lacrosse tournament 2016 First Team All-Conference nod.

Betsy Vendel:

Betsy Vendel is in her third season with the Southern Connecticut State women's lacrosse program in the 2017-18 academic year and was named as the team's Interim Head Coach in the fall of 2017. She was a four-year member of the squad at Central Connecticut State, a career that was capped by earning the Gail Rutz Award as the school’s Outstanding Female Athlete. She was a three-time All-Conference selection and the Northeast Conference Rookie of the Year as a freshman. Prior, she was a four-year member of the squad at Central Connecticut State, a career that was capped by earning the Gail Rutz Award as the school's Outstanding Female Athlete. A native of CT, Vendel led Newtown High to SWC Championship for four straight years and in 2009 was named Most Valuable Player of SWC Championship Game. She was a two-time All-SWC honoree and twice earned Connecticut Division 1 All-State honors. Vendel was named Connecticut Post Player of the Year in 2009 and left Newtown High with the record for career points. Vendel continued that success at CCSU earning Rookie of the Year honors during her freshman year and following that with Second Team All-NEC honors her sophomore year. She was a three-time All-Conference selection and the Northeast Conference Rookie of the Year as a freshman. Vendel holds the school record for career points at 186 points, the school record for career Assists at 99 and the school record for career draw controls at 174.

ANNE MURRAY:

Anne Murray was named the Associate Head Coach of Fairfield Women’s Lacrosse in July of 2017. Murray most recently coached at her alma mater, Princeton University, where she helped guide the Tigers to an NCAA postseason appearance in each of her five campaigns in New Jersey. Murray has been a member of Chris Sailer's coaching staff since 2013 as the Tigers claimed four Ivy League Regular Season Championships and two Ivy League Tournament Championships in that span. Princeton's five NCAA postseason berths from 2013-17 included three trips to the Second Round and two appearances in the National Quarterfinals as the Tigers compiled a total of 64 wins with Murray on the sidelines. Before venturing back to Old Nassau, Murray garnered Division I coaching experience at Mount St. Mary's, Virginia Tech and Rutgers, yale fall lacrosse tournament 2016. As a student-athlete at Princeton, Murray took the field for 51 games on attack. The Tigers earned a berth in the NCAA Championship in all four of those seasons, highlighted by three appearances in the National Quarterfinals. Murray earned a bachelor's degree in history from Princeton in 2009, yale fall lacrosse tournament 2016. Murray joins a Fairfield squad that went 12-6 overall in 2017 – the ninth time in the past 10 campaigns that the Stags tallied 10 or more wins. The Stags posted a 7-1 MAAC record and advanced to their eighth MAAC Championship Game. Fairfield is slated to return seven starters and 23 total student-athletes for the upcoming 2018 season.

Megan Cersosimo:

Megan Cersosimo was a four-year letter winner for the University of Connecticut. She was named All-BIG EAST second team as a senior and to the North Regional All-American Team and she won the UConn Club Award for Outstanding Senior Athlete in 2001. Megan was a captain in her junior and seniors years and left as the school career record holder in games started, ground balls and draw controls. Cersosimo was a 4 year letter winner in soccer and lacrosse at Great Valley HS in Malvern, PA. Her extensive coaching experience includes being an assistant Coach at UCONN from 2001 to 2006, the head coach at UCONN from 2006 to 2008 after which she became, and remains, the head coach at Yale fall lacrosse tournament 2016 High School. Megan was named the Class L Coach of the Year in 2015 and US Lacrosse Coach of the Year in 2017.

Megan Borman:

Megan Murphy Borman began coaching the Loomis Chaffee varsity girls lacrosse team in the spring of 2015. In Megan’s first season at the helm, the team won the Founders League and the Western New England championships. In 2016, the team had a perfect season with a record of 17-0, and Megan and co-coach Clarissa Clarke were named 2016 U.S. Lacrosse Connecticut High School Lacrosse Coach of the Year. Megan spent four years as the head coach of the Weston (Conn.) High School girls lacrosse program. Over her tenure at Weston, Megan coached the team to two Class S State Championships (2011, 2013) and the best season in program history in 2013 (21-1). Megan also was named 2011 Class S Coach of the Year and 2013 CT Post’s All-Region Girls Lacrosse Coach of the Year. Megan graduated in 2003 from Gettysburg College with a degree in history. She was a member of the Gettysburg women’s lacrosse team and was named a two-time IWLCA National All-American, three-time Regional All-American, three-time All-Conference player, Conference Player of the Year, and Offensive Player of the Year by Inside Lacrosse Magazine. Megan was inducted into Hall of Athletic Honor for Women’s Lacrosse in 2014 at Gettysburg College.

Emily Knapp:

Emily Knapp joins the Wesleyan Yale fall lacrosse tournament 2016 Cardinals for the 2017 - 2018 season. Knapp joins the Cardinals after graduating from the University of Colorado in May. She was a four-year member for the Buffaloes, playing attack and midfield at the Division I level. The 2014 campaign – Knapp's first with the Buffaloes – was the inaugural season for the Colorado women's lacrosse program as it finished 11-8 overall. The team posted a winning record in each of its first four seasons, which was capped off by a NCAA Tournament appearance this past spring as the Buffaloes finished 16-4 overall. Knapp – a New Jersey native – appeared in four games each season, and registered four goals and one assist for five career points. 

Kevin Siedlecki:

Kevin Siedlicki is in his second year as an assistant coach with the Southern Connecticut State women's lacrosse program yale fall lacrosse tournament 2016 2017-18. Siedlecki has been the head coach of Daniel Hand High School since 2009, where he has compiled a record of 103-41. Before that, he was assistant coach at Bethlehem Central, in New York. n seven seasons, he has led the Tigers to five SCC regular-season championships and three SCC tournament championships. Under Siedlecki, the Tigers have been to the Class M State Championship game twice. He was named New Haven Register Coach of the Year in 2011, and Southern Connecticut Conference Coach of the Year and CIAC Class M Coach of the Year in 2015, after the Tigers accomplished the best record in program history at 20-2. From the Daniel Hand program, yale fall lacrosse tournament 2016, athletes have gone on to play at all levels of collegiate lacrosse, from startup club programs to highly competitive Division I schools. Kevin is also an English teacher at Daniel Hand High School, where he graduated in 2002. He holds two bachelor's degrees from Union College, one in English and one in Music, and an MS in English from Southern Connecticut State. 

DAN WARBURTON:

Dan Warburton has been the head coach at Cheshire High School since 2002. During his time at Cheshire, he has compiled a record of 202-76-3. In fourteen seasons, Warburton has led the Rams to seven SCC regular season championships and six SCC tournament championships. In 2012, Warburton led Cheshire to a 20-3 record and the Class L State Championship game. The Rams have also made three Class L Semi-Final games during his tenure. Warburton was named Connecticut Class L Coach of the Year in 2011 and New Haven Register Coach of the Year in 2004 and 2012. Cheshire lacrosse players are well represented in the collegiate game, playing at many levels. Former players have been recognized as captains of their collegiate teams, and cornwall vikings volleyball honored with awards such as conference rookie of the year and collegiate All-American. Dan Warburton has been a teacher in the Technology Education department at Cheshire High School for the past 16 years. He holds a Bachelor's and Master's degree in Technology Education, as well as a second Yale fall lacrosse tournament 2016 degree play it again sports inline skates Educational Technology from Central Connecticut State University, yale fall lacrosse tournament 2016. Warburton also has a 6th-Year degree in Educational Leadership from Sacred Heart University.

JORDAN CHRISTOPHER:

Jordan Christopher is in her third season as an assistant coach at Quinnipiac in 2017. Christopher previously served as an assistant for Kotowicz at Central Connecticut State University from 2014 through the 2016 season. Christopher was part of the CCSU coaching staff that developed two All-Northeast Conference First Team and five All-NEC Second Team selections, as well as two All-Rookie Team honorees from 2014 through 2016, yale fall lacrosse tournament 2016. Under Christopher’s guidance, CCSU featured 13 Yale fall lacrosse tournament 2016 Spring Academic Honor Roll members as well as eight Travelers Athletic Directors All-Academic Team selections. In addition to posting the highest cumulative grade-point average in program history, the Blue Devils were also named a IWLCA Division I Academic Honor Squad in 2015 and 2016. In addition to her role at Central Connecticut State, Christopher also served as the head coach with the Philly Blast Lacrosse Club team from 2012 to 2014 and the Nor’easter Lacrosse Club team from 2014 to the present. A four-year letter winner at UConn, Christopher was a two-time captain in 2013 and 2014. A BIG EAST All-Academic selection, she also served on the Women’s Lacrosse Leadership Council in 2011 and 2012. In 2013, she was also part of the first team in UConn women’s lacrosse history to advance to the NCAA Tournament.

Emily Anderson:

Emily Anderson is welcomed to Hamden Hall Country Day School as Head Coach of the women's lacrosse program. Prior, Anderson, midfielder with the UConn Women’s Lacrosse Program appeared in all 16 games as a freshman, yale fall lacrosse tournament 2016. Additionally, Anderson led all freshmen with eight points on seven goals and one assist to go with 20 draw controls. She notched three goals against No. 18 Boston College (March 2) and tallied two goals and three draw controls against Sacred Heart (March 16). Prior to UConn, she earned an Honorable Mention All-American by U.S. Lacrosse, she was tabbed All-State three times in yale fall lacrosse tournament 2016 high school career. Anderson was named First Team All-Conference, team MVP and New Haven Register All-Area three times. She finished her career as the school record holder with 245 goals and being named Academic All-American, she led her senior squad to an undefeated conference championship. Anderson graduated in the top-10 in her high school class and was a member of the National Honor Society.

DANIELLE TAMMARO:

Danielle Tammaro currently serves as Head Coach of the Pomperaug women's lacrosse program. In 2017, she guided the Pomperaug program to earning the runner-up position in the Class M division. A 2010 graduate from Southern Connecticut State University with a degree in Exercise Science, Tammaro was a four year starter on the women's Lacrosse team. During her career as a Owl, she lead the team in ground ball pick ups as well as caused turnovers. She was honored with badminton court mat ac360 achievement awards for three consecutive years and served as team captain her senior year. Upon graduation, in 2010, Tammaro began working as a Physical Education teacher within Region 15 Schools and earned an M.S. in Human Nutrition from the University of New Haven. Tammaro, a 2006 graduate from Cheshire High School, yale fall lacrosse tournament 2016, has gained coaching experience by working with Daniel Hand High School and various camps and clinics across the state.  Tammaro is entering her first year as the head girls' lacrosse coach at Pomperaug High School.

COURTNEY DESTEFANO:

Courtney DeStefano, 2009 yale fall lacrosse tournament 2016 of Skidmore College in Saratoga Springs, NY. DeStefano was a four-year member of the varsity women’s team and a three year starting goalkeeper for the Thoroughbreds. DeStefano won Liberty-League All-Academic honors in each of her four years at Skidmore yale fall lacrosse tournament 2016 participated in the Liberty League semi-final championship as a first-year player. DeStefano played four years on the Moses Brown School (Providence, RI) varsity squad, captaining the team as a senior. She earned First Team All-State honors her junior year and Second Team All-State honors as a senior. DeStefano is currently the head coach for the girls varsity lacrosse program at Choate Rosemary Hall in Wallingford, yale fall lacrosse tournament 2016, Purple lawn bowls Moreau:

Taylor, a 2015 graduate of CCSU played 2 years D1 lacrosse at Winthrop University in South Carolina in the Big South conference and 1 season at CCSU. Her senior year she studied abroad in Africa, Australia and New Zealand. Taylor graduated from Glastonbury High in 2011, a 4 year varsity field hockey starter, 2 year captain and State Championship team member. She played 4 years varsity lacrosse, was a captain, all conference, first team all state and one of Hartford Courant's top yale fall lacrosse tournament 2016. She was a varsity assistant coach for GHS in 2014, the team made the state championship. She has coached at various camps and this is her 3rd year with Nor'easter. 

Riley Smith:

Riley Smith joins the Wesleyan coaching staff in 2018 after graduating from Fairfield University in May 2017 with a Bachelor of Science in Biology. Smith, a Guilford, Conn. native, played four years for the Stags as a midfielder and appeared in 20 games throughout her career, yale fall lacrosse tournament 2016. Smith also has years of coaching experience, in addition to her playing days, and has served as a head coach (goalies and field players) and recruiting coordinator for the Nor'easter Premier Lacrosse Club in New Haven, Conn. since 2013. Smith also served as the head junior varsity coach and assistant varsity coach at Saint Josephs High School in Trumbull, Conn. since 2016.

Kara McHugh:

Joined the Fairfield University Stags Coaching staff for the 2017/2018 season. A Marist College graduate, class of 2016 from Madison CT. McHugh played midfield in high school and college. She went on to be one of just three players in program history to reach 100 points and 100 draw controls in her career.  McHugh, a two time All-MAAC First Team selection, two time All-MAAC All Academic Team selection, and All MAAC Second Team selection. In her career, McHugh ranks seventh in goals, tied for ninth in assists, eighth in points, fourth in draw controls, and third in caused turnovers, and ranks eighth in single-season draw controls.

Julie Wadland:

A 2010 graduate of Dartmouth College, Julie was a two-time captain and All-Ivy League First Team selection for the Big Green. A goalie, she earned IWLCA All-American honors in 2010 and played for the U.S. National Team from 2008 to 2010. Prior to Loomis, Wadland was a volunteer assistant coach for Dartmouth while she worked toward her master’s degree. Wadland spent the fourth of july bowl breckenridge of 2016 playing for the Boston Storm, one of four teams competing in the inaugural season of the semi-professional United Women’s Lacrosse League (UWLX). As a high school student, High top basketball shoes 2017 was a three-sport captain in soccer, ice hockey, and lacrosse at Phillips Andover Academy.

ALEXA FOLDY:

Alexa Foldy played lacrosse at Brookfield high school and was all conference. Foldy played two years of Nor’easter Lacrosse and then played lacrosse at Eastern Connecticut State University, where she started all four years. She’s been coaching the JV lacrosse team for the past three years at Joel Barlow high school.

CAITLIN O'BRIEN:

Caitlin O'Brien is a 2017 graduate from the University of New Haven where she played Division II lacrosse all four years and served as a captain her senior season. At UNH, O'Brien was IWLCA third team All-North Region, NE-10 All-Conference second team, and was named to the 2017 DII IWLCA Senior All-Star team representing the North Region, yale fall lacrosse tournament 2016. Before New Haven, she graduated from Branford, where she played varsity lacrosse, field hockey, and ice hockey all four years. O'Brien currently coaches at Branford High School as a varsity lacrosse assistant coach. This is her 5th year coaching with Nor'easter, but she has been apart of the program since 6th grade.

CAROLYNN KEAL:

Carolynn Keal will begin her fourth year coaching with Nor’Easter this summer. After playing for the club throughout high school she wanted to continue to be apart of such an amazing program. She has recently graduated from Southern Connecticut State University with a Bachelors of Science in Biology with a concentration in Secondary Education. While at SCSU she was a four year starter and two year captain. In addition she set the career high for assists, ground balls and caused turnovers. During her freshman year she was selected as a member of the Northeast 10 All Rookie Team. She was a multiple time Northeast 10 Commissioners Honor Roll selection. As a midfielder yale fall lacrosse tournament 2016 can see the field from both an offensive and defensive perspective. 

SHELBY LAPOCE:

Shelby Iapoce is a 2016 graduate of Fairfield University, where she was a four-year starting defender for the Stags. During her career, she helped the Stags win 45 grand shooter chapter 2, which earned them spots in the MAAC Final Four in 2013, 2014, 2015, and 2016, along with 1 Regular Season MAAC Championship in 2014, 1 MAAC Championship in 2015, and 1 NCAA Tournament appearance in 2015. She was named the IWLCA Division 1 Community Awareness Award Winner, and Fairfield University's William Wallin Memorial Award Winner in 2016, for her volunteer efforts, including starting Fairfield's Military Appreciation Day, in which she helped raise $20,000 within the first 3 years of its inception, and for being a member of the Student Athlete Advisory Committee. Iapoce was also eric chesser bio to the All MAAC Rookie Team in 2013, the All MAAC Academic Team in 2014, 2015 and 2016, and the IWLCA Division 1 Academic Honor Roll in 2015 and 2016. She was also a member of Fairfield's Dean's List, earning a major in Accounting and a Minor in Studio Art. Along with coaching for Albany Elite Lacrosse, she also helped coach for Guilderland Youth Lacrosse and Fairfield Youth Lacrosse during her high school and collegiate career. She is also a 200 Hour Certified Yoga Instructor. Iapoce is a graduate of Guilderland High School, in Guilderland, NY, where she was named an Honorable Mention All-American, Academic All-American, MVP, and First Team All Star. She also lettered in soccer. 

EMMY JEDNOROWICZ:

AVERY GIORGIO:

ALICIA MORTALI:

GRACE MCCANN:

Grace McCann, a 2017 graduate from Wesleyan University, earned NESCAC All-Academic honors and was named to the IWLCA honor roll. McCann was the starting goalie for the Wesleyan University varsity program that won a Little Three Championship and competed in the NCAA Tournament for the first time in program history. At Wesleyan, McCann studied Neuroscience and Behavior. Prior to college, McCann played goalie at Simsbury High School and earned All-Conference honors. McCann now coaches for the Simsbury Youth Lacrosse program and joins the Nor'easter squad for another season!

MARISSA MCDERMOTT (NOR'EASTER GOALIE COACH):

Источник: [https://torrent-igruha.org/3551-portal.html]

BY THE NUMBERS

In Fall 2016, we began a collaboration with the Yale Daily News, entitled ”BY THE Colton softball sign ups. All articles that have been published by the YDN, or the YDN sports blog, “Down The Field”, are archived below.

2018-19

BY THE NUMBERS: Yale Just Falls to LSU: Luke Benz ‘19 breaks down how Yale had a perfect game plan but fell short in March Madness against LSU.

BY THE NUMBERS: Most Exciting Ivy Games: Luke Benz ‘19 uses his Game Excitement Index metric to break down the most exciting basketball games of the Ivy conference slate. 

BY THE NUMBERS: Ivy Hoops Midseason Rankings: Luke Benz ‘19 uses his NCAA Basketball Model to give some Ivy League power rankings at the midpoint of the Ivy season.

BY THE NUMBERS: Ivy Hoops Yale fall lacrosse tournament 2016 Rankings: Luke Benz ‘19 uses his NCAA Basketball Model to give some Ivy League power rankings in advance of conference play hitting full swing.

BY THE NUMBERS: Yale vs. Duke Preview: Krish Maypole ‘21 and Luke Benz ‘19 preview the upcoming Yale vs. Duke men’s basketball clash and analyze strengths and weaknesses of the two squads. 

BY THE NUMBERS: A Statistical History of The Game: Luke Benz ‘19 examines a the history of the Harvard-Yale football game since 1875.

BY THE NUMBERS: Princeton’s Success: Krish Maypole ‘21 and Luke Benz ‘19 place Princeton’s historically dominant football season in context and offer some keys to the Yale-Princeton football game.

BY THE NUMBERS: Rise of Ivy League Football Recruiting:Using data from 247Sports, Luke Benz ‘19 examines the recent rise in recruiting success in Ivy League football.

BY THE NUMBERS: Ivy League Football Preview: Luke Benz ‘19 gives a 2018 Ivy League Football preview based simulations using the YUSAG FCS model.

2017-18

BY THE NUMBERS: Ivy Lax Approaches Final Week: Matt Robinson ‘18 breaks down the numbers in advance of the Ivy League Lacrosse tournaments in NYC.

BY THE NUMBERS: Baseball MVPs: Luke Benz ‘19 turns to Ivy League Baseball Wins Above Replacement to identify the most valuable players in the Ancient Eight.

BY THE NUMBERS: Softball MVPs: Luke Benz ‘19 turns to Ivy League Softball Wins Above Replacement to identify the most valuable players in the Ancient Eight.

BY THE NUMBERS: How Mad was March?: Luke Benz ‘19 creates a new metric comparing each year’s NCAA basketball tournament to the average tournament in order to contextualize just how crazy the 2018 tournament was.

BY THE NUMBERS: Ivy League Lacrosse Predictions: Matt Robinson ‘18 uses the YUSAG college lacrosse rankings to break down each Ivy League’s teams chances at postseason success.

BY THE NUMBERS: Yale Heads to Ivy Madness: Luke Benz ‘19 previews the 2nd iteration of the Ivy League Men’s and Women’s Basketball Tournament with title odds and breakdowns of potential championship matchups.

BY THE NUMBERS: Ivy Hoops Enters Home Stretch: With four games left in Ancient Eight Confernce Play, Luke Benz ‘19 details each’s teams math to the Palestra.

BY THE NUMBERS: Math to Ivy Madness: Luke Benz ‘19 hits reset on the Ivy League as conference play enters the seconf half of the season.

BY THE NUMBERS: Ivy Basketball Analytics: Luke Benz ‘19 assess each Ivy League’s team’s chances of reaching Ivy Madness and explains why this weekend’s games against Harvard and Dartmouth are especially important.

BY THE NUMBERS: Replacing Makai Mason: Luke Benz ‘19 debuts college basketball assist networks to examine how Yale’s offense has done without its star point guard.

BY THE NUMBERS: The Game 2017: Matt Robinson ‘19 gives a statistical preview of the 134th playing of the Harvard-Yale football game.

BY THE NUMBERS: Ivy Title Race Heats Up: Luke Benz ‘19 and Matt Robinson ‘18 break down the numbers you need to know for the final 3 weeks of the Ivy League Football season.

BY THE NUMBERS: Ivy League Football Quick Hits: Luke Benz ‘19 examines title odds and Yale’s outlook at the midway point of the football season.

BY THE NUMBERS: Ivy League Football Preview: Matt Robinson ‘18 uses the YUSAG college football model to simulate the Ivy League Football season in order to give predicted records and title odds for each team.

BY THE NUMBERS: How to Win an Ivy League Football Championship: Luke Benz ‘19 breaks down why controlling the running game is much more important than controlling the passing game for winning titles in the Ivy League.

Summer 2017

Yale Baseball Postseason Predictions: Luke Benz ‘19 simulates the NCAA Baseball tournament to determine Yale’s chances for postseason success.

All-Ivy Baseball/Softball Snubs and Surprises: Luke Benz ‘19 uses his WAR project to evaluate the Ivy League’s all-conference honors and doles out some hot takes.

2016-17

BY THE NUMEBRS: Baseball/Softball MVPs: Luke Benz ‘19 analyzes the most valuable Ivy League Baseball/Softball players using Wins Above Replacement (WAR) and other advanced MLB stats.

BY THE NUMBERS: Ivy League Track MVPs: Michael Menz ‘17 runs a 10,000 iterations of a simulated track meet to account for race-to-race variability and find the most valuable performers in the Ivy League.

BY THE NUMBERS: Ivy League Baseball Park Factors: Michael Bogaty ‘19 explores which Ivy League baseball stadiums can be classified as hitter-friendly and pitcher-friendly parks.

BY THE NUMBERS: Ivy League Lacrosse Predictions: Daniel Tokarz ‘20 and Luke Benz ‘19 break down the odds for the Yale Men’s and Women’s Lacrosse teams to reach the postseason.

BY THE NUMBERS: Ivy League Baseball Pythagorean Win Percentages: Michael Bogaty ‘19 calculates Pythagorean Win Percentages for each of the Ancient Eight teams and analyzes which teams under/over-performed last season in hopes of better predicting this season’s results.

BY THE NUMBERS: Ivy Math-ness: Luke Benz ‘19 previews the Ivy League basketball tournament, assigning odds to each team’s chances of reaching March Madness. Benz also breaks down what must go right for the Bulldogs if they wish to beat rival Harvard.

BY THE NUMBERS: Math To The Palestra: Luke Benz ‘19 and Michael Bogaty ‘19 break down odds and scenarios for the Yale Men’s and Women’s Basketball teams for make the Ivy League tournament.

BY THE NUMBERS: Counting Yale’s Losses: Evan Green ‘17 breaks down shot charts from the Yale Men’s Basketball team’s graduating seniors and explores how team tendencies have changed this season.

BY THE NUMBERS: Swimming MVPs: Michael Menz ‘17 offers an in-depth look at which Ivy League swimmers are most valuable to their respective teams.

BY THE NUMBERS: The Biggest Home-Field Advantage: Will Min ‘19 explores home-field advantage in the Ivy League, and examines whether away trips to Cornell (Ithaca, NY) are more difficult than the rest of the Ancient Eight.

BY THE NUMBERS: Hoops Analysis: Luke Benz ‘19 and Michael Bogaty ‘19 examine updated playoff odd for the inaugural Ivy League Tournament after the first full weekend of Ancient Eight play.

BY THE NUMBERS: ECAC Hockey Predictions: Michael Bogaty ’19 crunches playoff odds for the men’s and women’s ECAC hockey teams and analyzes the Yale men’s teams chances vs. rival Quinnipiac University in the “Battle for New Haven”.

BY THE NUMBERS: Ivy Hoops Games to Watch: Luke Benz ‘19 introduces the “Playoff Swing Factor” to Ivy League Basketball and analyzes which games will have the biggest impact on the playoff race.

BY THE NUMBERS: Women’s Hockey Predictions: Michael Bogaty ‘19 updates his ELO model and uses it to predict results for the Yale Women’s Hockey Team.

BY THE NUMBERS: Men’s Hockey Prediction’s: Michael Bogaty ‘19 begins a new series in our collaboration with the Yale Daily News, in which we make predictions for several Yale Sports Teams. In this first installment, Bogaty covers Yale Men’s Hockey.

BY THE NUMBERS: Ivy Hoops Weekend Recap: We help the Yale Daily News kick off their new sports blog, “Down the Field”, with an analytical recap of last weekend’s Ivy League Men’s Basketball games.

BY THE NUMBERS: Basketball Begins: Continuing our mazda 6 vs dodge dart with the Yale Daily News, Luke Benz ‘19 previews the Ivy League Men’s Basketball season and explores team’s chances of reaching the Ivy Yale fall lacrosse tournament 2016 Tournament in March.

BY THE NUMBERS: Harvard vs. Yale: Matt Robinson ‘18 breaks down Yale’s chances of winning “The Game” 2016.

ANALYSIS: Volleyball starts slow, yale fall lacrosse tournament 2016, ends strong: In another collaboration with the Yale Daily News, Michael Menz ‘17 explores the signal given by the first set in Ivy League Volleyball. Teams that win the first set by more are more likely to go onto the win the match. Additionally, the Yale Volleyball team was the team most likely to come back from losing the first set.

Ivy League Projections - Updated Through 3 Weeks: Matt Robinson ‘18 using updated ELO and Sagarin ratings analyzes the current state of Ivy League Football and chronicles the decline in Yale’s projected wins.

BY THE NUMBERS: Home-field advantage in the Ivy League: In another collaboration with the Yale Daily News, Yale fall lacrosse tournament 2016 Green ‘17 investigated the size of and factors behind home field advantage in different Ivy League sports. Despite the differences in fan attendance, travel accommodations, and skill level of athletes, home field advantage was not significantly different in the Ivy League than that seen in professional sports leagues. 

BY THE NUMBERS: Previewing the Ivy League football season: This article by Matthew Robinson ‘18 is the first piece in our collaboration with the Yale Daily News. Throughout this year we will be analyzing Ivy League sports and publishing them in the Yale Daily News and on our website here. In this article, he introduces ELO ratings for the Ivy League and projects the Ivy League standings using the ELO ratings and Sagarin Ratings.

Источник: [https://torrent-igruha.org/3551-portal.html]

MEN’S LACROSSE: Yale wins Ivy League tournament, earns national No. 4 seed

At the beginning of the 2016 season, seniors on the Yale men’s lacrosse team said their performance in May would define the year. Just two games into the season’s final month, the Bulldogs now have both a championship and a top-five national seeding to show for it.

Yale (13–2, 5–1 Ivy) captured its fourth Ivy League tournament championship in the last five years this weekend after defeating Penn 7–6 in the semifinal and Harvard 14–9 in the final. The victories, along with a nearly perfect regular season that included a signature win over current top seed Maryland in February, earned Yale the No. 4 seed in the 16-team NCAA tournament and a Sunday matchup against Navy in the first round. The Bulldogs will play the Midshipmen at Reese Stadium at 5:15 p.m., marking their first NCAA tournament home game since 1990.

Playing two familiar foes in the conference tournament, which was hosted by Brown, Yale proved it could play multiple styles of lacrosse. The Bulldogs ground out a victory in a defensive battle against Penn (8–7, 4–2) on Friday and powered past Harvard (8–8, 3–3) on Sunday in an offensive explosion led by attackman Ben Reeves ’18, who scored four goals and tallied five assists on Sunday on the way to being named the Most Outstanding Player of the tournament.

“It’s very surreal, and [winning the Ivy League] has been one of our goals since beacon park golf club scorecard one as a team,” attackman Jack Tigh ’19 said. “It feels great to celebrate with all my teammates.”

However, the title was never a given for the Bulldogs. While Yale only trailed Penn for a little over a minute in the second quarter, the yale fall lacrosse tournament 2016 contest was tied for almost the entire fourth quarter until Reeves scored his third goal of the game on an extra-man laser into the top corner with 3:43 remaining. Yale’s defense closed out the game, preventing the Quakers from getting any quality looks on cage.

The semifinal was close in all facets of the game, with Penn barely outshooting Yale 33–31 and grabbing just one more ground ball than the Bulldogs. Yale goalie Hoyt Crance ’19 matched Penn’s Reed Junkin, who was recently named the Ivy League Co-Rookie of the Year, with 10 saves apiece.

In the second semifinal, Harvard handed then-No. 2 Brown its second loss of the season, forcing a No. 5 overall seed for the Bears in the national tournament, yale fall lacrosse tournament 2016. Although Ivy League Player of the Year Dylan Molloy scored five goals for Brown in the 13–12 loss, Harvard attackman Morgan Cheek put up the performance of the tournament, yale fall lacrosse tournament 2016, scoring nine goals on the night. Harvard goalie Robert Shaw made 15 saves to slow down Brown’s lethal attack, which tallied 14 goals against the Bulldogs in April.

Yale jumped out early in Sunday’s final, a rematch of the regular season finale eight days prior, as Reeves, midfielder Jason Alessi ’18 and attackman Jeff Cimbalista ’17 gave the Bulldogs a 3–1 lead early. However, Harvard quickly bounced back to tie the game at four late in the first quarter.

Reeves scored 46 seconds into the second quarter, but Harvard tied the game with a rare own goal by the Bulldogs off a chaotic scrum for a ground ball, though the score was eventually credited to Harvard attackman Devin Dwyer. Cheek gave the Crimson its first and only lead of the day with 11:52 to play in the quarter before Yale midfielder Michael Keasey ’16 closed out the half with two-straight goals, including one in which he ran the length of the field and sniped the net from afar as time expired.

Although Dwyer would tie the game at seven shortly after halftime, the Elis began to assert their will in the second half as Yale’s dominance in faceoffs and ground balls proved to be too much for the Crimson. The Bulldogs won 17 of 25 faceoffs on the day and scooped up 40 ground balls compared to just 24 for Harvard.

Reeves scored his third goal of the game before assisting Cimbalista on his second of the contest. A Crimson strike from Dwyer and Reeves’ fourth goal put the score at 10–8 entering the fourth quarter.

Attackman Joe Lang brought Harvard within one, but Keasey then scored the first of four straight goals by the Yale offense to close out the game.

The Bulldogs move on to host Navy (10–4, 7–1 Patriot) on Sunday, hoping to advance to the tournament quarterfinals for the first time since defeating Penn State in the 2013 first round. If Yale wins, it will face the winner of Brown and Johns Hopkins, a matchup in which Brown is favored.

“I definitely think winning this is good momentum for us going into the NCAA tournament, but now the stakes are much higher,” said midfielder Mike Bonacci ’16, who scored in the fourth quarter. “It is single elimination, so now is when we have to play like each game could be our last. I’m excited for what is to come but we have a lot of work ahead of us.”

Yale and Navy last faced off in the 1992 NCAA tournament first round, with the Bulldogs prevailing 9–3 before falling 17–8 to Syracuse. Navy has lost two of its last three games entering the NCAA tournament contest.

MATTHEW MISTER prince smart tennis sensor

Источник: [https://torrent-igruha.org/3551-portal.html]

MEN’S LACROSSE: Navy upsets Yale, knocks Bulldogs out of NCAA tournament

Courtesy of Yale Athletics

A historic Yale men’s lacrosse season this year included a No. 1 national ranking at one point, an Ivy League tournament title and the team’s first NCAA tournament home game since 1990. But after an upset loss this weekend, an NCAA tournament win will remain noticeably absent from yale fall lacrosse tournament 2016 Bulldogs’ 2016 list of achievements.

The No. 4-seeded Bulldogs (13–3, 5–1 Ivy) fell 13–10 to Navy at home on Sunday, yale fall lacrosse tournament 2016, leaving the tournament early with their first loss to a team outside of the national top 10 this year. Despite outshooting the Midshipmen 39–34 and picking up seven more ground balls than its opponent, Yale came up empty-handed as Navy’s previously struggling offense came to life and goalie John Connor saved 12 Yale shots.

“I give [Navy] a lot of credit,” Yale head coach Andy Shay said. csd tennis struggled [at the end of the regular season], and it’s not often you take two weeks off and come back the way they did. It was a huge challenge for us, and we came out on the short end of it. I’m sure [Navy players are] pleased with their effort, and they should be.”

The 3,526 fans in attendance, marking the most at Reese Stadium since Yale played Princeton in the 1990 NCAA tournament, saw an incredible display of grit, as captain and defender Michael Quinn ’16, who tore his ACL three weeks ago against Albany and told the News the following week he was out for the season, played nearly 50 minutes of the game.

 

Despite having Quinn for the first time in four games, the Bulldogs had little answer for the Navy offense, which had not scored more than five goals in its last three games but scored 13 on Sunday, tying the Midshipmen’s second-highest total of the season.

“Coach Sowell and [assistant] coach [Michael] Phipps really got us back to being ourselves and get back to the things that we had gotten away from,” Navy captain and attackman Patrick Keena said.

Navy looked rusty after its two-week break in the first quarter. Attackman Jack Tigh ’19 scored the first two goals for the Bulldogs, which were both assisted by attackman Ben Reeves ’18. Tigh would finish the day with a career-high three goals.

Later in the quarter, Reeves and midfielder Jason Alessi ’18 found the back of the net to give Yale a 4–1 lead with 6:50 remaining in the first quarter.

However, Navy eventually found its grove and scored the next four goals of the game to take a 5–4 lead. Two of those goals came from midfielder Casey Rees, yale fall lacrosse tournament 2016, who led all players on Saturday with four goals.

Yale goals from attackman Jeff Cimbalista ’17 and midfielder Will Robinson ’18 gave the Bulldogs their last lead of the game at 6–5, and the teams went into halftime tied at seven.

Navy outscored Yale 5–3 in the second quarter largely because of success at the faceoff X, which would prove to be a theme of the game. Behind faceoff man Brady Dove, whom Shay described as an “absolute bull” and a “warrior”, the Midshipmen won seven of nine faceoffs in the quarter, and they finished the day capturing 62 percent of the draws.

“A lot of our offensive success has to do with how much we have possession,” Navy head coach Rick Sowell.

Although Navy scored two goals within the first six minutes of the second half, the most prominent highlight of the third quarter was the effort of the Navy defense, and in particular, its anchor in net. Connors made six saves in the quarter, as many as Yale goalie Hoyt Crance ’19 would make in the entire game.

Connors, a senior, finished the day with 12 saves in one of the biggest games of his collegiate career. But when asked if it was the best game of his career, he was quick to note that while he played a great second half, he let in several goals he thought he should have saved in the first 30 minutes.

Connors and Sowell also credited the defense for limiting Yale’s inside shots. Whatever the cause, the Bulldogs scored just once in the third quarter and entered the final 15 minutes trailing 9–8.

Keena tallied the first goal of the fourth quarter, capping a two-goal and four-assist performance, before the Bulldogs were set back in another way a few minutes later.

With about 10 minutes remaining in the final quarter, Quinn’s injured knee finally gave out, and he immediately hobbled to the sideline in conspicuous pain. Not only did Quinn pick up two ground balls and force a turnover in his 50 minutes of action, he also inspired his teammates by playing on the injury.

“He did it for Yale,” Shay said. “He’s just such an impressive leader. I’m really proud to be associated with that kid. When he went down against Albany, it really affected our guys emotionally. Just to have him there as a presence was huge.”

YaleLacrosse5
Quinn, number 44, played most of the game in a knee brace and wrap before falling to the ground and leaving the game in the fourth quarter. (Courtesy of Yale Athletics)

The teams traded goals before Reeves scored to tighten the score to 11–10 with 6:54 remaining. Reeves finished the game with three goals and three assists and, on the same yale fall lacrosse tournament 2016, was named one of five finalists for the Tewaaraton Award, college lacrosse’s Heisman Trophy for the most outstanding player. In the award’s 16-year history, Reeves is the first Bulldog to be named a finalist.

However, Reeves and the offense could not bring the Bulldogs back, as Navy scored the final two goals of the game and escaped with a 13–10 victory.

“I won’t deny that [this win] does mean a lot, and I’m so happy I can go with [this senior class],” Sowell said. “They came in at a low point, and just to see the program come from where it did and where we’re at now, it took a lot of hard work. We get to be together another week and get to put the jerseys on one more time.”

Navy will face No. 5 seeded Brown in the quarterfinals next week. No. 1 seeded Maryland, who Yale beat 8–5 in February, beat Quinnipiac 13–6 in other NCAA tournament action.

MATTHEW MISTER

Источник: [https://torrent-igruha.org/3551-portal.html]

Tournament Central
Box Scores: Game 1

Yale Bulldogs men's lacrosse

Yale Bulldogs
Yale Bulldogs script.svg
Founded1882
UniversityYale University
Head coachAndy Shay (since 2003 season)
StadiumReese Stadium
(capacity: 3,000)
LocationNew Haven, Connecticut
ConferenceIvy League
NicknameBulldogs
ColorsYale blue and white[1]
   
(1) - 1883
(1) - 2018
(1) - 2019
(3) - 1990, 2018, 2019
(5) - 1990, 1992, 2013, 2018, 2019
(10) - 1988, 1990, 1992, 2012, 2013, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019
(5) - 2012, 2013, 2015, 2016, 2017
(8) - 1956, 1969, 1988, 1989, 1990, 2010, 2017, 2018

The Yale Bulldogs men's lacrosse team represents Yale University in National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I men's lacrosse. Yale competes as a member of the Ivy League and plays their home games at Reese Stadium in New Haven, Connecticut. The Bulldogs have captured the Ivy League championship five times. Yale is credited, alongside Harvard and Princeton, with the 1883 national championship.[2]

On May 28, 2018, the Bulldogs defeated Duke to claim their second ever national title and first NCAA championship in the sport. Yale returned to the championship game the following year, but lost to the Virginia Cavaliers in the 2019 championship final.

History[edit]

The first Yale lacrosse team was fielded in 1882 and joined the Intercollegiate Lacrosse Association the following year.[3] The 1978 team, coached by Bob McHenry, was one of Yale's most exciting teams to watch in action.

Yale has made ten appearances in the NCAA tournament since its establishment in 1971. Their first appearance was in 1988, when they were eliminated in double overtime by Virginia, 10–9. In 1990, Yale earned a first-round bye, and then defeated Princeton, 17–9, for their first NCAA tournament win. The Bulldogs fell in the semifinals to Loyola, 14–13 in double overtime, yale fall lacrosse tournament 2016. Yale returned to the NCAA tournament in 1992, advancing through the first round with a win against Navy, 9–3, before being eliminated by Syracuse, 17–8.[4]

Yale finished the 2010 season with a 10–4 record, but an Ivy League tournament semifinal loss to Princeton and a weak RPI kept them out of the NCAA field.[5] The yale fall lacrosse tournament 2016 finished the season ranked 18th in the Nike/Inside LacrosseMen's Division I Media Poll.[6]

Since 2010, yale fall lacrosse tournament 2016 the direction of head coach Andy Shay, Yale has won ten or more games every season except 2014 when they won 9. During that time they won or shared nude volleyball pictures Ivy League regular season titles, including 2 outright, as well as participating in every Ivy League tournament since its inception in 2010, winning five of them. In addition during that span the Bulldogs have made 7 NCAA tournament appearances, winning 8 NCAA tournament games, culminating in a national championship in 2018, followed by a national championship runner-up finish in 2019.[citation needed]

Season results[edit]

The following is a list of Yale's results by season as an NCAA Division I program:

Season Coach Overall Conference Standing Postseason
Bob McHenry (Ivy League)(1970–1980)
1970 Bob McHenry 8–44–23rd
1971 Bob McHenry 5–73–34th
1972 Bob McHenry 7–84–2T–2nd
1973 Bob McHenry 4–81–5T–6th
1974 Bob McHenry 3–80–67th
1975 Bob McHenry 7–72–45th
1976 Bob McHenry 6–80–67th
1977 Bob McHenry 6–81–5T–5th
1978 Bob McHenry 5–81–5T–6th
1979 Bob McHenry 7–71–56th
1980 Bob McHenry 3–110–67th
Bob McHenry:61–84 (.421)17–49 (.258)
Mike Waldvogel (Ivy League)(1981–2002)
1981 Mike Waldvogel 6–80–67th
1982 Mike Waldvogel 3–100–67th
1983 Mike Waldvogel 5–100–67th
1984 Mike Waldvogel 4–91–5T–6th
1985 Mike Waldvogel 10–34–2T–2nd
1986 Mike Waldvogel 5–92–45th
1987 Mike Waldvogel 6–72–45th
1988 Mike Waldvogel 12–45–1T–1stNCAA Division I First Round
1989 Mike Waldvogel 10–55–11st
1990 Mike Waldvogel 16–25–1T–1stNCAA Division I Final Four
1991 Mike Waldvogel 8–73–3T–3rd
1992 Mike Waldvogel 12–45–12ndNCAA Division I Quarterfinals
1993 Mike Waldvogel 7–63–3T–3rd
1994 Mike Waldvogel 8–64–23rd
1995 Mike Waldvogel 5–92–4T–5th
1996 Mike Waldvogel 9–54–23rd
1997 Mike Waldvogel 5–91–5T–6th
1998 Mike Waldvogel 5–92–4T–5th
1999 Mike Waldvogel 7–64–2T–2nd
2000 Mike Waldvogel 8–53–3T–3rd
2001 Mike Waldvogel 6–73–3T–3rd
2002 Mike Waldvogel 9–44–2T–2nd
Mike Waldvogel:166–144 (.535)62–70 (.470)
Daryl Delia (Ivy League)(2002–2003)
2003 Daryl Delia 9–52–4T–4th
Daryl Delia:9–5 (.643)2–4 (.333)
Andy Shay (Ivy League)(2004–Present)
2004 Andy Shay 6–81–57th
2005 Andy Shay 7–5–13–34th
2006 Andy Shay 6–81–56th
2007 Andy Shay 7–62–45th
2008 Andy Shay 4–100–67th
2009 Andy Shay 5–81–5T–6th
2010 Andy Shay 10–44–2T–1st
2011 Andy Shay 10–43–3T–3rd
2012 Andy Shay 11–54–2T–2ndNCAA Division I First Round
2013 Andy Shay 12–54–22ndNCAA Division I Quarterfinals
2014 Andy Shay 9–53–34th
2015 Andy Shay 11–53–3T–4thNCAA Division I First Round
2016 Andy Shay 13–35–12ndNCAA Division I First Round
2017 Andy Shay 10–65–11stNCAA Division I First Round
2018 Andy Shay 17–36–01stNCAA Division I Champion
2019 Andy Shay 15–45–12ndNCAA Division I Runner–Up
2020 Andy Shay 3–10–0
Andy Shay:156–90–1 (.634)50–46 (.521)
Total:661–528–6 (.556)

      National champion        Postseason invitational champion  
      Conference regular season champion         Conference regular season and conference tournament champion
      Division regular season champion      Division regular season and conference tournament champion
      Conference tournament champion

†NCAA canceled 2020 collegiate activities due to the COVID-19 virus.

References[edit]

  1. ^"Yale University – Identity Guidelines". Retrieved April 19, 2017.
  2. ^Yale Men's Lacrosse 2010 Quick Facts (PDF), Yale University, retrieved May 30, 2010.
  3. ^David G. Pietramala, Bob Scott, Lacrosse: Technique and Tradition, rent home for super bowl 2018. 243-244, Baltimore: JHU Press, 2006, ISBN 0-8018-8371-7.
  4. ^Official 2008 NCAA Men's and Women's Lacrosse Record Book (PDF), National Collegiate Athletic Association, yale fall lacrosse tournament 2016, retrieved May 30, 2010.
  5. ^Geoff Shannon, Snubs and Surprises from Men's DI NCAA Tournament Field, Inside Lacrosse, May 9, 2010.
  6. ^Nike/Inside Lacrosse Men's DI Media Poll, ESPN, June yale fall lacrosse tournament 2016, 2010.
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yale fall lacrosse tournament 2016

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