Bridger bowl whale

bridger bowl whale

All Product Tags. bridger bowl ski area · bridger bowl · bozeman whale · spirit guardian · bridger canyon whale · montana skiing · bozeman ; Other Products. The newly carved legendary Bridger Canyon whale waits to be lifted by crane to it's final resting place atop a foot-high pole on Logan. Have you ever been to Bozeman, and seen this old carved wooden Whale on the way to or from Bridger Bowl and wondered about it? bridger bowl whale

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2020/21 Season Highlights

Bridger bowl whale - apologise, but

Winter

Montana Treasure: Bridger Bowl's Whale Superstition

The following message is transmitted at the request of the Forest Service West Central Montana Avalanche Center Missoula MT The Forest Service West Central Montana Avalanche Center Missoula MT has Issued a Backcountry Avalanche Warning * WHATThe avalanche danger will rise to high today as a powerful storm sweeps across the region. The avalanche danger will remain elevated Friday with continued snowfall and strong winds. Avalanches can step down to weak layers at the base and mid snowpack, resulting in large unsurvivable avalanches. * WHEREAcross the West Central Montana forecast area, including Lolo pass, southern Mission, southern Swan, Rattlesnake, and southern and central Bitterroot Mountains. All elevations will be impacted by heavy snow and elevated avalanche hazard. * WHENIn effect until 7 AM MST Friday. * IMPACTSIncreasingly heavy snow falling atop low-density snow and wind is creating widespread areas of unstable snow. PRECAUTIONARY/PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS Dangerous avalanche conditions. Travel in avalanche terrain is not recommended. Human Triggered avalanches are certain, natural avalanches are likely. Avalanches may run long distances and can run into mature forests, valley floors, or flat terrain. Consult casinoextra.fr for more detailed information. Similar avalanche danger may exist at locations outside the coverage area of any Avalanche Center. && The National Weather Service in Missoula has issued an Airport Weather Warning for Missoula International Airport /MSO/ for the following threats Multiple threats of snow/wind/freezing rain. Moderate to heavy snow will continue over the airfield through roughly 1pm this afternoon. Snow will then become lighter in intensity, continuing through roughly 5pm MST this afternoon. An additional 1 to 2 inches is possible through this time frame. After 5pm MST, warmer air will begin to bring a mix of rain and snow to the airfield. A period of freezing rain is possible as this transition occurs, possibly lasting through the overnight hours. A light glaze of ice is possible. Finally, gusty southwest to west winds are anticipated to develop by Friday afternoon, with gusts of 30 to 40 mph possible. Blowing and drifting snow is anticipated for a period of time Friday afternoon. WINTER STORM WARNING REMAINS IN EFFECT UNTIL 11 AM MST FRIDAY * WHATHeavy snow followed by light freezing rain is expected. Total snow accumulations of 6 to 9 inches and ice accumulations of a light glaze. * WHEREMissoula/Bitterroot Valleys. * WHENUntil 11 AM MST Friday. * IMPACTSTravel could be very difficult. PRECAUTIONARY/PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS If you must travel, keep an extra flashlight, food, and water in your vehicle in case of an emergency. The latest road conditions for the state you are calling from can be obtained by calling 5 1 1. &&
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Legendary Bridger Canyon Whale

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Bucko Slabaugh, a carpenter with Dovetail Construction, secures the newly revamped, more than pound legendary Bridger Canyon whale onto a foot-high pole Tuesday morning on Logan Leachman’s property. Below him, the wood carver Kevin Sullivan and Chandler Leachman, Logan Leachman’s son, watch the installation.

Legendary Bridger Canyon Whale

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The newly carved legendary Bridger Canyon whale waits to be lifted by crane to it's final resting place atop a foot-high pole on Logan Leachman's property. Kevin Sullivan, with Dovetail Construction, carved the more than pound whale out of Alaskan yellow cedar. The original tail however was preserved from the first whale, carved by George Rice in

Legendary Bridger Canyon Whale

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Kevin Sullivan, the wood carver with Dovetail Construction responsible for revamping the Bridger Canyon whale, points to a picture of the old whale carved in by George Rice. The figure is nearly unrecognizable after being stolen twice, burned once and spending 45 years in the wind, rain and snow.

Legendary Bridger Canyon Whale

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Joshua Mikesell, a crane operator with Montana Crane Service, lifts the newly revamped more than pound legendary Bridger Canyon whale onto a foot-high pole Tuesday morning, October 16, , on Logan Leachman's property.

Legendary Bridger Canyon Whale

Buy Now

The newly carved legendary Bridger Canyon whale is installed atop a foot-high pole Tuesday morning, October 16, , on Logan Leachman's property. Kevin Sullivan, with Dovetail Construction, carved the more than pound whale out of Alaskan yellow cedar. The original tail however was preserved from the first whale, carved by George Rice in

Legendary Bridger Canyon Whale

Buy Now

The newly carved legendary Bridger Canyon whale sits on a loading truck, waiting to be lifted by crane to it's final resting place atop a foot-high pole on Logan Leachman's property. Kevin Sullivan, with Dovetail Construction, carved the more than pound whale out of Alaskan yellow cedar. The tail however was preserved from the original whale.

Legendary Bridger Canyon Whale

Buy Now

Kevin Sullivan, with Dovetail Construction, carved the more than pound whale out of Alaskan yellow cedar. The original tail however was preserved from the first whale carved by George Rice in

Legendary Bridger Canyon Whale

Buy Now

The newly carved legendary Bridger Canyon whale sits on a loading truck, waiting to be lifted by crane to it's final resting place atop a foot-high pole on Logan Leachman's property. Kevin Sullivan, with Dovetail Construction, carved the more than pound whale out of Alaskan yellow cedar. The original tail however was preserved from the first whale carved by George Rice in

Legendary Bridger Canyon Whale

Buy Now

Joshua Mikesell, a crane operator with MT Crane Service, does a practice run before lifting the more than pound Bridger Canyon whale to rest on the top of a foot-high pole on Logan Leachman's property.

Источник: [casinoextra.fr]

My first ascents up Bridger Canyon Drive to ski at Bridger Bowl began in , most of them with my significant other Brian, and sometimes with some of our local friends. It was certainly within the first few trips up the canyon that the legend of “The Whale” was brought to my attention. Just over 11 miles from downtown Bozeman, now sitting high atop a 20 foot pole carved with the words “Guardian Spirit” sits the whale. The legend, thought to begin in the late 70s or early 80s, was told to me a bit differently than many I spoke to while researching for this story. The legend was passed on to me as something like “Hail the Whale!” as the vehicle I rode in was passing the whale going 55ish mph. “What?” “Hail the Whale; wave at the whale so it will bring more snow.” “Ok.” Salute. Rest assured, although I have been ‘hailing the whale’ for the past 18 years on my drive up the canyon instead of ignoring him on the way up and acknowledging him on the way down I have had no major injuries while skiing, and many epic days.

In this game of telephone we play sometimes things don’t get to the end quite the way they start, this is often the case with legendary tales. “We do not look at the whale on the way up. We salute it on the way home.” Kevin Wiesner, owner of Ph.D. Skis in Bozeman attests. Kevin has been friends with the son of the whales creator since they were both kids. George Rice, a former MSU professor of psychology, is the creator/carver of the roughly four foot wooden killer whale. A trip to the Pacific Northwest in the early 70’s stirred an interest for Rice in the whale motif created by the Native Americans there. The whale is a symbol of good fortune and well being. Animal totems in general were believed to have spiritual significance and watched over the family, clan, or tribe symbolizing their guardian spirit or helper. Upon his return to his home in Bridger Canyon George saw a large log on his property, and thought ‘I’ll carve a whale out of that’. In the unpainted carved whale was placed on a fence post just off the road, and so the Bridger Canyon whale saga began.

Although George Rice created the whale he did not create the legend as we know it today. Kevin at Ph.D. mentioned the name Matt Crane to me, which led me to the crew at World Boards who consider Matt an “epic Bozeman legend” in his own rite. Matt, now living out of state, gave me his take on the whale legend, and a decent line to follow. “If I had to venture a guess as to the origination of the salute - I would probably attribute it to a group in the mid 80’s called “Wild Style Freestyle”. These were the forefathers of what is now the BSEF freestyle program. This group included the Papke brothers (Ron & Mike who is now BSEF Freestyle director), Mike Leslie, Curtis Johnson, Tony Gilpin & Mickey Price among others. The roots of the salute possibly go back further to a group in the 70’s known as the BBLPA. The members know who they are if their memories are intact.”

Tony Gilpin, one of the founding fathers of freestyle for the state of Montana, and current BSEF Freestyle coach, believes the superstition of the whale goes back before his time on the “Wild Style Freestyle” team, and before his rides on the ski bus beginning in the early s. The “Wild Style” group rode the ski bus to Bridger Bowl together every weekend and holiday; a loud, rambunctious group of boys who would all look away from, or shield their eyes from, the whale on the way up the mountain. As soon as the bus was past the whale the crew would look back and pay their respects. As long as you didn’t look at the whale before you passed you could look back and still have a great day on the mountain. “It was a really big deal for everybody on the bus” Tony says, “I don’t think the kids on the team today associate the whale with a particular superstition.” He hasn’t heard much of the whale from current ski team kids they see it “more of a monument now, than a superstitious whale” he figures.

Mike Papke BSEF Freestyle director tells his story this way: “I am the youngest of 3 brothers. We would drive past the whale every weekend since I was 5. I could not put a year to [it] but I would say that for the past 30 years I have been paying respect to the whale. I personally believe that the original whale had more powers. [Before the whale was stolen, dismantled and put back together]. I remember being a cocky 18 year old, and member of the US Freestyle ski team thinking that nothing mysterious could effect my day. I flipped it off on the way up and had the worst day of skiing of my life. There were no injuries but everything I did went wrong. I have been a freestyle coach for the Bridger Ski Foundation for the past 20 years and all of the athletes that have been a part of my program are aware of the whale. This tradition of the spirit of the whale has been a fun superstition; if you believe in it or not. I personally always do not look at it on the way up and salute it on the way down!

The “original whale” Mike refers to, the one placed by George Rice on the fence post just off the Bridger Canyon road, has been stolen a couple of times. In public outcry for the return of the whale helped find it, in four pieces, on the back deck of an MSU students home. The whale was returned to the Rice’s, and George put it back together, painted it teeth and all, and placed it further back on the property atop the “Guardian Spirit” post.

It is assumed that George Rice carved his whale to look over his own property and family, but the Bridger Canyon whale has become a much larger symbol that has inspired immense respect from an entire community and generations of Bridger Bowl skiers.

A big thank you to Glen Stark for suggesting this story, Ruth Hall current custodian of the whale, Kevin at Ph.D., Matt Crane, Marc Parent, Tony Gilpin and Mike Papke for their input, and George Rice for allowing us to all share his whale.   

 

Angie Ripple is doing her best to ski her Bridger Bowl pass off this season in between wrangling her three small children and making sure Bozeman Magazine gets to you each month. “Hail the Whale!”

Источник: [casinoextra.fr]

"Hey MOM! What is THAT?" by Diana Hafemeyer

How many times have you driven to Bridger Bowl? Everytime you go, do you notice something new? My family and I moved to Bozeman 2 ski seasons ago, and it wasn't until this year when one of our children said, "Hey MOM! What is that? What is its story?" that we noticed it. 

It's a WHALE! You will find it 11 miles from downtown Bozeman. What is its story? After reading an article in The Bridger Canyon Whale (casinoextra.fr) by Angie Ripple, I learned about the story of the whale Salute is  on the way home and it will bring more snow. What have you heard about the whale? What do you know about it? Is it a family tradition in your vehicle?

A whale is a symbol of good fortune and well being. Whether it is there for that, or for more snow, I am not really sure. I do know that George Rice originally created the whale and it stands on a 20ft pole on the way to Bridger. It is a work of art! It got our attention and the question is, does it get yours?

Do you have any questions about Bozeman or the surrounding area? Are you thinking of moving your family here? Contact Real Estate Agent, Diana Hafemeyer, at  to answer any of your questions and get the information you need to be successful.

Don't forget to follow us on social media!  

Posted by Diana Hafemeyer on

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Источник: [casinoextra.fr]

The Spokesman-Review Newspaper The Spokesman-Review

Aunica Koch / SWX

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Winter

03 Jan Round Up: The Snow Totem Returns

in Round Up

Bridger Canyon Whale still standing

WIND ADVISORY IN EFFECT FROM 7 AM TO 7 PM PST FRIDAY * WHATSouthwest winds 20 to 30 mph with gusts up to 50 mph expected. * WHEREColfax, Quincy, Winchester, Worley, Cheney, Hayden, Ephrata, Wilbur, Ralston, Moscow, Cashmere, Othello, Coeur d'Alene, Uniontown, Tekoa, Odessa, Moses Lake, Rockford, Rosalia, Coulee City, bridger bowl whale, Spokane, Creston, Grand Coulee, bridger bowl whale, Electric City, La Crosse, Lamona, Post Falls, Wenatchee, Harrington, Davenport, Entiat, Potlatch, Plummer, Genesee, Stratford, Oakesdale, Chelan, Pullman, Ritzville, Coulee Dam. * WHENFrom 7 AM to 7 PM PST Friday. * IMPACTSGusty winds will blow around unsecured objects. Tree limbs could be blown down and a few power outages may result. Anticipate patchy blowing and drifting snow. PRECAUTIONARY/PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS Winds this strong can make driving difficult, bridger bowl whale, especially for high profile vehicles. Use extra caution. &&

Currently in Spokane

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There are times when a house is more than a house.

A house is a keeper of memories, generations, and traditions.

It can be a vital thread in the fabric of community.

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For Logan Leachman, JLF Architects partner, the property he bought outside of Bozeman, Montana, in Bridger Canyon was all of these things.

He and his wife Jamie purchased the unique creekside house and land east of town with visions of a tasteful renovation. But before new floorplans could be drawn or any windows could be enlarged, they knew they needed to address an important feature on the property: The Guardian Spirit Whale.

Carver Kevin Sullivan volunteered 70 hours of time to restore a local Montana legend.

Over 40 years ago, the previous owner erected a large wood carving of an orca on a post bridger bowl whale toward the Bridger Mountain Range, which houses Bridger Bowl Ski Area. Over the years, it became a totem for avid skiers who placed faith in the power of the whale to make or break a good ski day. The legend prescribed that one should never look at the mythical whale on the way up to Bridger or risk having a bad day on the slopes, but one should religiously thank the whale on the way home to garner good luck for another day, bridger bowl whale. The regular homage to the Guardian Spirit Whale has been passed on from one generation of skiers and bridger bowl whale to the next, including Leachman’s tnpl live streaming star sports kids who grew up on Bridger Bowl’s friendly runs. But when he acquired the property, he noted that the whale was in sad shape and in need of a complete overhaul.

The greater Bozeman community took note of the effort, featuring the thoughtful restoration in Big SkyJournal and the local newspaper to keep Whale followers abreast. The totem was removed after the winter season and taken into the shop of carver Kevin Sullivan, a design-build partner at Dovetail Construction. Restoring the whale with care over roughly 70 hours, shaping a bridger bowl whale of Alaskan yellow cedar with chainsaws and chisels, Sullivan brought it back to fine form. He supervised its placement on Leachman’s property as a crane set the pound wooden whale onto a hays cisd football schedule pole. And so, the legend lives on.

As much as every JLF Architects’ design-build home is a collective of creative conversations and craftsmanship, we also celebrate the link to a place that anchors every project. Connections come in all forms, large and small, but each one should be treated equally. In the case of the Bridger Canyon Guardian Spirit Whale, the JLF team applied every bit as much effort to restoring its form as it would put into a custom home. The details matter.

Источник: [casinoextra.fr]

"Hey MOM! What is THAT?" by Diana Hafemeyer

How many times have you driven to Bridger Bowl? Everytime you go, do you notice something new? My family and I moved to Bozeman 2 ski seasons ago, and it wasn't until this year when one of our children said, "Hey MOM! What is that? What is its story?" that we noticed it. 

It's a WHALE! You will find it 11 miles from downtown Bozeman. What is its story? After reading an article in The Bridger Canyon Whale (casinoextra.fr) by Angie Ripple, I learned about the story of the whale Salute is  on the ava bears football 2017 home and it will bring more snow. What have you heard about the whale? What do you know about it? Is it a family tradition in your vehicle?

A whale is a symbol of good fortune and well being. Whether it is there for that, or for more snow, I am not really sure. I do know that George Rice originally created the whale and it stands on a 20ft pole on the way to Bridger. It is a work of art! It got our attention and the question is, does it get yours?

Do you have any questions about Bozeman or the surrounding area? Are you thinking of moving your family here? Contact Real Estate Agent, Diana Hafemeyer, at  to answer any bridger bowl whale your questions and get the information you need to be successful.

Don't forget to follow us on social media!  

Posted by Diana Hafemeyer on

Tags

Источник: [casinoextra.fr]

Montana Treasure: Bridger Bowl's Whale Superstition

The following message is transmitted at the request of the Forest Service West Central Montana Avalanche Center Missoula MT The Forest Service West Central Montana Avalanche Center Missoula MT has Issued a Backcountry Avalanche Warning * WHATThe avalanche danger will rise to high today as a powerful storm sweeps across the region. The avalanche danger will remain elevated Friday with continued snowfall and strong winds. Avalanches can step down to weak layers at the base hockey goalie svg mid snowpack, resulting in large unsurvivable avalanches. * WHEREAcross the West Central Montana forecast area, including Lolo pass, southern Mission, southern Swan, Rattlesnake, and southern and central Bitterroot Mountains, bridger bowl whale. All elevations will be impacted by heavy snow and elevated avalanche hazard. * WHENIn effect until 7 AM MST Friday. * IMPACTSIncreasingly heavy snow falling atop low-density snow and wind is creating widespread areas of unstable snow. PRECAUTIONARY/PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS Dangerous avalanche conditions. Travel in avalanche terrain is not recommended. Human Triggered avalanches are certain, natural avalanches are likely. Avalanches may run long distances and can run into mature forests, valley floors, or flat terrain. Consult casinoextra.fr for more detailed information. Similar avalanche danger may exist at locations outside the coverage area of any Avalanche Center. && The National Weather Service in Missoula has issued an Airport Weather Warning for Missoula International Airport /MSO/ for the following threats Multiple threats of snow/wind/freezing rain. Moderate to heavy snow will continue over the airfield through roughly 1pm this afternoon, bridger bowl whale. Snow will then become lighter in intensity, continuing through roughly 5pm MST this afternoon. An additional 1 to 2 inches is possible through this time frame. After 5pm MST, warmer air will begin to bring a mix of rain and snow to the airfield. A period of freezing rain is possible as this transition occurs, possibly lasting through the overnight hours. A light glaze of ice is possible. Finally, gusty southwest to west winds are anticipated to develop by Friday afternoon, with gusts of 30 to 40 mph possible. Blowing and drifting snow is anticipated for a period of time Friday afternoon. WINTER STORM WARNING REMAINS IN EFFECT UNTIL 11 AM MST FRIDAY * WHATHeavy snow followed by light freezing rain is expected. Total snow accumulations of 6 to 9 inches and ice accumulations of a light glaze. * WHEREMissoula/Bitterroot Valleys. * WHENUntil 11 AM MST Friday. * IMPACTSTravel could be very difficult. PRECAUTIONARY/PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS If you must travel, keep an extra flashlight, food, and water in your vehicle in case of an emergency. The latest road conditions for the state you are calling from can be obtained by calling 5 1 1. &&
Источник: [casinoextra.fr]

My Life as a Pioneer

Remembering the early bridger bowl whale at Bridger Bowl. 

Once upon a time, long, long ago—with the greatest chagrin I realize I’m talking a half-century here—a magic chariot would arrive at our house on winter Sunday mornings and whisk my brother and sister and me away to an enchanted wonderland where we frolicked all day.

The wonderland was Bridger Bowl, in its earliest years of operation, and the chariot was a gigantic whale, a Nash, perhaps the largest, most bulbous sedan Detroit ever sent into the world. Like those circus cars lance briggs football camp pour out of, Al Abelin’s Nash held an unlimited number of skiers, mostly kids, although my mother came once as a curious spectator, bought some used skis, and became a regular in the Nash. Al’s wife didn’t ski and neither did my father—“Someone’s got to earn a living after you all break your legs,” quoth he.

It was never a sure thing bridger bowl whale we’d actually make it to Bridger Bowl. The first obstacle was that long hill, the last mile of Bridger Canyon Road before the Bridger Bowl turnoff. Loaded as it was, Al’s Nash could take that hill in any road conditions, but sometimes another driver would get himself stuck crosswise, and then Al would stop, disperse all those kid-bodies to shove the stuck car out of the way, back all the way down the hill, and try again.

The Bridger Bowl access road was longer than it is today, but if there weren’t too many abandoned vehicles, we usually made it to the parking lot. Al’s strategy was to go so early that no one would be stuck ahead of us. That suited us fine—making the first tracks on the mountain bestowed great status in our kid culture. Most mornings we were there before George Ripley (“Rip” to all who knew him) got the lift started.

The lift ride—and the subsequent run back down the mountain—were shorter in those days of yore. That flattish area where the Pierre’s Knob and Deer Park lifts begin? That was the parking lot surfing in rocky point mexico antediluvian times. To reach the lift, we hiked up the steep hill to where the Murphys bowl Park Chalet is now, bought our tickets, and got in line. The lift ran up along the little ridge just to the north of where the Chalet sits.

I used to assure neophyte friends that there were only three things to worry about with that lift: getting on, staying on, and getting off. The heavy metal T-bars dragged in the snow and were icy and slippery when Rip handed one to you and your partner-for-the-ride. If all went well, it dragged you all the way to the top of the lift, as long as you kept your skis in the tracks and didn’t run into your partner’s, bridger bowl whale. If you crossed your tips, or lost your balance and fell, you’d knock your partner off and probably the folks behind you, bridger bowl whale. The challenge getting off the lift came when the metal bar froze to the butt of your european specialist sports nutrition alliance pants.

One of the great sports of my misspent childhood was catching “drops”—the T-bars someone else had missed down at the loading area. We did it to save waiting in line, although Al’s middle kid, Bridger bowl whale, specialized in catching drops to avoid buying a cent lift ticket. He’d clamber up the hill and lurk by the lift bridger bowl whale until an empty drop came by.

Back then there was no fancy chalet—just an old hunk of World War II–surplus housing with a warming stove made out of an old fuel barrel at one end and a primitive kitchen where a family from Clyde Park peddled homemade treats and hamburgers. Restrooms? Hah! You think it’s hard getting through all the sweater layers to get down to business in a heated restroom? Try it with frozen fingers in an outhouse sometime.

I guess we were pioneers. Not trailblazers like the folks who hiked all the way daiwa saltiga surf braid back in the s to harvest the potential joy laid down with every heavy snowfall in the bowls at Bridger. But compared to what folks find today when they take that turn off the Bridger Canyon Road—yeah, we were bridger bowl whale at a primitive ski area.

Not that we ever sat around congratulating ourselves on our hardy accomplishments. We barely took time to chew our hamburgers before we were off again, riding up the mountain on legs that would be wobbly with fatigue before bridger bowl whale heed Al’s signal to ski back down to the Nash and head for home. All we knew was that life was beautiful and fun and we had a serious responsibility as Bozeman kids to ski like mad.

Some years later, skiing in New England, I’d hear people tut-tutting as I zoomed past. “Ski in control! Ski in control!” they’d chide me. Bah! Effete Eastern wimps, I’d think, longing for the big sky and carefree (read: inexpensive) days growing up at Bridger Bowl.

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3 comments

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