Curling club scoreboard

curling club scoreboard

Demo: casinoextra.fr - GitHub - milwaukee-curling-club/curling-scoreboard: A scoreboard with an admin interface made specifically. by Kevin Martin Curling. 3' x 8' Traditional Scoreboard. Made of Aluminum Composite; Including number Price $ Thompson Rink Equipment. The winner is the team with the highest score after all ends have been completed (see Scoring below). A game may be conceded if considered unwinnable.

Curling club scoreboard - not agree

Granite Curling Club of Seattle" width="" height="">

So in this example, Yellow scored 1 point in the first end and so the number 1 goes above the &#;1 Point&#; listed in the middle row. Then in the second end Red scored 3, so the number 2 (for the second end) goes below the &#;3 Point&#; marker. When Yellow score in end 3, this gets added to their existing point and so the number 3 (for the third end) goes above their new total, 4 points. This means that whichever team is &#;further along&#; the board is winning the game. In our example:

1st end: Yellow score 1

2nd end: Red score 3

3rd end: Yellow score 3

4th end: Red score 1

5th end: Yellow score 1

6th end: Red score 1

7th end: Yellow score 1

8th end: Yellow score 2

9th end: Red score 1

Final Score: Yellow 8 v Red 6

For more on curling terminology, visit our glossary page!

Hopefully you might like to come and give curling a try.

For a one-off session, visit our Try Curling page to book a two hour session for yourself, or bring friends and family.

Alternatively, you could book a place on one of our Learn To Curl courses which run over a series of 4 weekly two hour sessions.

Источник: [casinoextra.fr]

Understanding the Scoreboards in Curling

As you would see in televised or professional curling, the scoreboards are easy to read and understand. They look something like this:

Ice 1

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

TOTAL

 

4

0

2

0

0

1

2

0

0

X

9

 

0

0

0

1

1

0

0

2

1

X

 

5

 

   The hammer represents the team with the last rock  through an end.

The bold numbers in the first row are the ends.

In end 1, blue scored 4, therefore red received 0 points. There were no rocks in the house in end 2, so it was a blank end and no one scored. Blue scored another 2 points in end 3. The points went along as so but after end 9, red forfeited the game and two X’s were put on the board to indicate that the end was not played. Blue won with a total of 9&#;5 over red.

 

 

As you may have noticed, not all scoreboards are as above. Most curling clubs use a different, slightly more complicated, method of scoring. Before the game, here’s what these scoreboards look like:

 

Ice 1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The blue and red are the curling club’s rock colours. The numbers on the board are the amount of points each team has. There is also a small box beside the board containing the numbers 1 through 1 through 10 for the usual ends, and the 11 for that extra end you sometimes need.

 

 

End 1:

Ice 1

 

 

 

 

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

After the first end, blue scored 4 points. The number 1 from the little box (representing the first end) is put above the number 4 because of the amount of points made. It is on the blue row because blue scored.

 

End 2:

Ice 1

 

 

 

 

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2

 

This end was blank because no points were made. The marker for the second end usually goes at the end of the board to show that it was blank. Some teams like to flip the marker over not to confuse the spectators.

 

End 3:

Ice 1

 

 

 

 

1

 

3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2

 

End 3, blue scored another two points. When you add 2 points to the previous score, the blue team is now at 6. (4+2) The marker is then placed over the six because that is how many points they have in total after three ends. The current score is for the blue team because there are no end markers on the red row.

 

End 4:

Ice 1

 

 

 

 

1

 

3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

 

4

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2

 

Red finally scored a point! You add this end to the previous score (if there is any), for a total of 1 (0+1). The current score is now , again in favour of blue.

 

End 5:

Ice 1

 

 

 

 

1

 

3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

 

4

5

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2

 

Red stole* (took points without last rock advantage) another point. They are now at 2 points in total (1+1) so the 5th end marker is placed underneath the 2.

 

End 6:

Ice 1

 

 

 

 

1

 

3

6

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

 

4

5

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2

 

In this end, team blue scored another point, which is added to their previous score of six (4+2+1). The marker is placed above the 7 because that is how many points blue has after 6 ends. The score after these 6 ends is now for blue.

 

End 7:

Ice 1

 

 

 

 

1

 

3

6

 

7

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

 

4

5

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2

 

Blue is still leading the way. They stole 2 more points. They are now at 9 points (4+2+1+2) as you can see above. The 7th marker is placed above the 9. The scoreboard now shows in favour of blue.

 

End 8:

Ice 1

 

 

 

 

1

 

3

6

 

7

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

 

4

5

 

8

 

Источник: [casinoextra.fr]

Once you understand how to score points in curling, the next step is to be able to read the scoreboard. This is something that takes a bit of time to get used to, especially as there are two different ways that scoreboards work in this sport. Below we will explain both of them, which we will refer to as &#;Ends On Top&#; and &#;Points In The Middle&#;.

The first example is the type of scoreboard you will see if you are watching the Olympics or a high-level curling competition such as the Brier or the Scotties. These scoreboards have the &#;Ends On Top&#; which are shown below in white numbers. Remember that in curling, only one team can score in each end. This means that there will always be a &#;0&#; for at least one of the teams in each end. If the end is a blank end, then both teams would have a &#;0&#;.

This style of scoreboard is perhaps the easiest to read, as the number underneath each end simply shows how many points that team scored in the end. Add up all of the points in each row and that gives you the total score, shown above as for the final of this game.

However, in most curling clubs these &#;Ends On Top&#; scoreboards are not used. This is because most rinks still use wooden or metal boards, and are not equipped with digital ones. Therefore, you&#;d need to be prepared with at least 10 of each number (especially 0&#;s, 1&#;s, and 2&#;s) to place underneath each end. Considering that some rinks have many sheets of ice, this is not realistic.

Instead, most curling rinks with traditional boards use the &#;Points In The Middle&#; system shown in the image below. Here, the numbers place in the Yellow & Red zones are the ends, placed above/below the points.

Scoreboards  <div><h2>Scores</h2><div><div><div><h3>LIVE SPORTS, SPORTSCENTRE AND MORE – STREAM ON TSN DIRECT!</h3></div><div>TSN<ul><li><div><ul><li>NHL<div><ul><li><div><strong>Flames rise high, Habs rock bottom in NHL Power Ranking</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>Forsberg, Predators stay hot with victory over Kings</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>Marchessault scores twice, Golden Knights beat Rangers</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>NHL: Rangers 1, Golden Knights 5</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>NHL: Blue Jackets 1, Devils 3</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>NHL: Panthers 5, Stars 6 (SO)</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>NHL: Penguins 6, Flyers 2</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>Landeskog hat trick, five points from MacKinnon help Avs rout Jets</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>NHL: Flames 1, Lightning 4</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>Larsson's 1st hat trick powers Coyotes past Blackhawks</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>What led to Winnipeg's second period let down?</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>Benn, Stars exit COVID protocols with win over Panthers</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>Boldy nets 1st NHL goal as Wild edge Bruins; Kaprizov exits with injury</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>Kucherov has two assists in return; Lightning beat Flames</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>Devils beat Blue Jackets for 4th win in 5 games</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>Penguins beat Flyers for 10th straight victory</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>Sharks end two-game skid with win over Sabres</strong></div></li></ul></div></li><li>CFL<div><ul><li><div><strong>Bombers reach extension with DL Jefferson, nearing deal with DE Jeffcoat</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>Mace officially named new Argos defensive co-ordinator</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>Calvillo joins Alouettes staff as QB coach</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>Blue Bombers sign OT Hardrick to contract extension</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>3 Downs: Elks and Stamps ink QBs, Calvillo returns to Alouettes</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>Reinebold heads to Montreal as special team coach</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>Elks re-work QB Arbuckle's contract</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>Blue Bombers sign receiver Blake Jackson</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>Calvillo joins Alouettes staff as QB coach </strong></div></li><li><div><strong>Stamps, Begelton agree to terms on one-year deal</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>Stampeders re-sign defensive lineman Orimolade</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>Thomas to return for 10th season with Blue Bombers</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>Stampeders add QB Stevens</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>Elks sign three Canadians, including veteran lineman Foucault</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>Stampeders extend OL Good-Jones through </strong></div></li><li><div><strong>Blue Bombers, Canadian DB Hallett agree to one-year extension</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>Tiger-Cats to announce new ownership structure</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>Tiger-Cats announce new ownership structure</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>Reinebold leaving Ticats after seven seasons with club</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>Stampeders sign QB Maier to contract extension</strong></div></li></ul></div></li><li>NFL<div><ul><li><div><strong>Packers OC Hackett to interview with Jaguars</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>NFL Spotlight: Bucs cut Antonio Brown</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>Schefter on AB saga: 'Both sides again make their own claims about what unfolded'</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>Bucs release Antonio Brown, say he was cleared to play</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>Top NFL plays of the season</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>Ex-NFL RB Portis sentenced to six months for fraud scheme</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>LSU cornerback Stingley Jr. to enter NFL draft</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>Arians claims Brown was upset about targets</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>What took the Bucs so long to release Antonio Brown</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>Orlovsky: Colts the team 'best-built' to beat the Chiefs</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>Orlovsky blasts MVP voter who said he wouldn't vote for Rodgers</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>Bears put QB Fields on reserve/COVID list</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>Buccaneers respond to Brown's allegations, terminate contract</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>Irvin shares whether he trusts Herbert or Carr more with the season on the line </strong></div></li><li><div><strong>Steelers place WR Johnson, C Green on Reserve-COVID list</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>Woody: Antonio Brown's statement is 'eye-opening'</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>Carr, Raiders preparing for potential all-or-nothing showdown with rival Chargers</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>Antonio Brown explains his side of the story, says he was cut before leaving field</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>Brown says he was forced to play on injured ankle</strong></div></li></ul></div></li><li>NBA<div><ul><li><div><strong>DeRozan: We're all playing with a chip on our shoulder</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>Must See: 6-foot-3 Gary Payton II wins jump ball over 7-footer Jonas Valanciunas</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>NBA: Clippers 89, Suns </strong></div></li><li><div><strong>Udoka rips Celtics' 'lack of mental toughness' after blowing lead</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>Randle says thumbs-down gesture meant hush boos at MSG</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>Paul has triple-double, NBA-leading Suns top Clippers</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>NBA: Celtics , Knicks </strong></div></li><li><div><strong>Non-boosted NBAers to be tested daily through All-Star break</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>Ingram scores 32, Pelicans beat depleted Warriors</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>NBA: Warriors 96, Pelicans </strong></div></li><li><div><strong>Report: Kawhi ahead of schedule in ACL rehab</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>NBA: Pistons 88, Grizzlies </strong></div></li><li><div><strong>Morant, Grizzlies rout lowly Pistons for 7th straight win</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>Barrett banks in winner as Knicks complete comeback against Celtics</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>Must See: RJ Barrett banks in desperation 3 at the buzzer as Knicks stun Celtics</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>NBA fines Kings $50,, AGM Wilcox $15,</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>Jazz's Gobert, Bucks' Holiday enter NBA's health and safety protocols</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>Wizards announcer Consor apologizes to Porter for comment</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>Perkins' top-5 international NBA players</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>Warriors' Curry (quad), Green (hip) miss game against Pelicans</strong></div></li></ul></div></li><li>Golf<div><ul><li><div><strong>PGA: Sentry Tournament of Champions - Rd. 1</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>Cantlay, Rahm don't miss beat with good starts at Kapalu</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>Stricker details battle with mysterious illness after captaining U.S. at Ryder Cup</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>Tiger's return among questions for golf's new year</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>Hovland reunited with clubs ahead of Sentry Tournament of Champions</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>Speed Golf: Who will be No. 1 in the world a year from now?</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>Kapalua means time for Rahm and Cantlay to get back to work</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>Champ withdraws from PGA Tour's Sentry Tournament of Champions</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>Bob Weeks Picks Six: Sentry Tournament of Champions</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>Canadian Golf Rankings - January 3, </strong></div></li><li><div><strong>PGA TOUR Canada announces Qualifying Tournament schedule</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>Golf offered up plenty of memorable and forgettable moments in </strong></div></li><li><div><strong>Players to get Saudi release with pledge to return to Pebble</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>Tiger, son sink 11 straight birdies, but Daly duo win PNC Championship</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>Final golf ranking of brings Masters field to 83, includes Canadian Hughes</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>Woods returns with three shots that look like the Tiger of old</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>Woods returns to golf, still 'long way' from the real thing</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>Woods has 'an awesome day' with son in return to golf at PNC Championship pro-am</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>Woods said to be 'crazy good' as he prepares for golf return</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>Spieth and caddie looking for an edge in reading putts</strong></div></li></ul></div></li><li>Soccer<div><ul><li><div><strong>TFC’s Laryea to join English Championship club Nottingham Forest</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>CanMNT cancels Florida training camp</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>Canada's Priestman not on list of final nominees for FIFA coaching award</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>Manchester City dealing with COVID outbreak; Four Serie A games postponed</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>TFC’s Laryea to join English Championship club Nottingham Forest</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>Turkish Super Cup: Besiktas 1, Antalyaspor 1 ( PK)</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>Davies tests positive for COVID; David doing well after testing positive </strong></div></li><li><div><strong>Chelsea gifted goals by Spurs to gain cup semifinal lead</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>Canada's Atiba Hutchinson named man of the match in Besiktas' Turkish Super Cup win</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>Barcelona rallies to beat third-tier team in Copa opener</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>US women to face Iceland, New Zealand and Czech Republic</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>St. Louis MLS expansion team hires Carnell as coach</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>Bradley brings experience, enthusiasm and hope to Toronto FC</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>Canada's Labbe one of three finalists for FIFA goalkeeping award</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>Canada's Davies tests positive for COVID</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>Kawabe joins Wolverhampton from Grasshoppers</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>Liverpool closes training centre as COVID cases rise</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>Report: Insigne to join Toronto FC in blockbuster MLS deal</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>Southampton bought by firm fronted by Serbian media giant</strong></div></li></ul></div></li><li>Curling<div><ul><li><div><strong> Curling on TSN Broadcast Schedule</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>Waiting Game: After cancellation of mixed doubles trials, curlers waiting on decision</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>Ontario Scotties suspended due to provincial restrictions</strong></div></li><li><div><strong> Tournament of Hearts and Brier Playdowns</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>Which Canadian mixed doubles team should be selected for Beijing?</strong></div></li><li><div><strong> Curling Roster Tracker</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>Canada's Olympic mixed doubles curling trials cancelled due to COVID</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>Former Bottcher vice Moulding to join Team Grattan</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>Kennedy joins Gushue's curling team as Olympic alternate</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>Epping outlasts Koe in Banff, Walker wins in Avonair as playdowns near</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>Kennedy will join Team Gushue at Beijing Olympics as an alternate</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>Zacharias captures Manitoba Scotties title, Homan qualifies for Ontario playdowns</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>Curling Canada finalizes team field for mixed-doubles trials</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>St-Georges/Asselin, Carey/Hodgson qualify for Mixed Doubles Trials</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>Sex toy ads removed from ice at Olympic curling qualifier</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>Moulding not planning to make decision on curling future until New Year</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>Americans Plys, Persinger make Olympic mixed doubles field</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>Continental Cup cancelled due to 'travel restrictions, isolation requirements'</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>Einarson, Jacobs team up for Canadian mixed doubles trials</strong></div></li></ul></div></li><li>NCAA<div><ul><li><div><strong>Bama extends Saban through </strong></div></li><li><div><strong>Duke coach-in-waiting Scheyer: Goal is to 'win the whole damn thing' for Krzyzewski</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>Manziel says he made 'decent living' selling autographs at Texas A&M</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>Duke coach Krzyzewski to retire after season</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>Who is Jon Scheyer? Meeting the Duke basketball assistant who will be Coach K's successor</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>Bush, Luck, Lynch among nominees for College Football Hall of Fame</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>UCLA's Riley enters NBA draft, not hiring agent</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>Canada's Amanda wins MAC Hermann Trophy</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>Robert Morris cuts men's and women's hockey</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>Metchie wins Cornish Trophy as outstanding Canadian in NCAA football</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>Former LSU starting quarterback Finley transferring to Auburn</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>Former MSU player Appling arrested in connection to fatal shooting</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>UConn extends Auriemma through </strong></div></li><li><div><strong>Santa Clara wins College Cup on penalties over Florida State</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>Marshall wins first-ever College Cup with OT win over Indiana</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>Former Hawaii standout Brennan dead at 37</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>Jordan game-worn North Carolina jersey sells for $ million</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>Texas linebacker Ehlinger found dead</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>Hubbard, Metchie among Cornish finalists</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>Three Canadian soccer players among 15 semifinalists for MAC Hermann Trophy</strong></div></li></ul></div></li><li>Tennis<div><ul><li><div><strong>Auger-Aliassime stuns Zverev in first-ever top five win, Canada reaches ATP Cup semis</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>Djokovic to remain in visa limbo until Monday as he fights deportation from Australia</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>Daily Australian Open coverage on TSN</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>Australian PM on Djokovic: Rules are rules </strong></div></li><li><div><strong>Nadal on Djokovic: 'If he wanted, he would be playing here in Australia without a problem'</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>Djokovic's mother: They are keeping him prisoner </strong></div></li><li><div><strong>Canada advances to ATP Cup semifinals</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>Nadal wins opening match; Osaka also advances</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>Djokovic in limbo as he fights deportation from Australia</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>Wertheim on Djokovic: 'It's just another instance of self-sabotage'</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>Fifth-seeded Swiatek defeats Fernandez in Adelaide</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>PTI's Wilbon and Kornheiser applaud Australia for denying Djokovic entry</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>Australia cancels visa of world No.1 Djokovic, asks him to leave country</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>Barty opens her season with win over Gauff in Adelaide</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>Spain beats Serbia, joins Poland in ATP Cup semifinals</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>Djokovic has visa cancelled; told to leave Australia</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>Osaka opens season with win over Cornet </strong></div></li><li><div><strong>Shapovalov, Auger-Aliassime lead Canada past Great Britain at ATP Cup</strong></div></li><li><div><strong>Djokovic receives medical exemption to play at Australian Open</strong></div></li></ul></div></li></ul></div></li></ul></div></div></div>Источник: [casinoextra.fr]</div> <div><div><p>Welcome! We're glad you have chosen to become a member of the Port Perry Curling Club. We're committed to serving our membership, so please don't hesitate to contact any one of our club Directors with any questions, concerns or compliments. We welcome your suggestions and advice and will make every effort to earn your continued support. As a member, it is your privilege to participate in the many different activities the club offers. Please keep in mind that our club’s ability to offer its varied services and events depends greatly on the active participation of the membership, so we encourage you to volunteer whenever and wherever you can. Volunteering is also a great way to get to know other club members. </p><p>Good Curling!</p><p>Clothing:</p><p>Curling is a sport where ease of movement is critical. It requires bending and stretching during the course of the game which lasts about two hours on the ice surface. You will also wish to be comfortable off the ice as you enjoy both pre- and post-game chats. </p><p>A pair of curling shoes is ideal but if you are just starting this sport, a clean pair of running shoes worn only while curling will do nicely. They MUST NOT be worn outside because even the smallest bit of dirt on the ice surface can cause a rock to go off course. If your shoes are not insulated you will probably wish to wear a very warm pair of socks.  There are also insoles made of reflective material that you can place in your shoes to provide a barrier between your foot and the cold surface.</p><p>Your pants should be such that they will allow for plenty of stretch and free movement both during delivery and sweeping. Available on the market are curling pants, jogging suits, stretch leggings, and yoga pants. Most people find it difficult or uncomfortable to curl in jeans, cords or dress pants. It is also recommended that curling pants not be worn outside in case they may come in contact with road salt or grit, which could then be transferred to the ice surface.</p><p>Dressing in layers is suggested for your upper body. At the start of a game you may find it cold or damp on the ice. As the game progresses, with increased movement you may wish to peel off the outer layer. Some people layer, for example, turtleneck, vest, sweater/fleece and jacket. It is preferable not to have fleece as your outermost layer   anytime during the game. The constant rubbing of your arms against your body causes small bits of material to fall on the ice. These can get caught under the rock, causing it to go off course. It will not take you long to know what works best for you. (Skips tend to dress warmly as they sweep less.)</p><p>Generally, people wear curling gloves or mitts that have a non-slip palm and keep the hands warm and protected while sweeping. A considerable amount of body heat is lost through your head; some people like to wear a hat.</p><p>Curling clothing and equipment can be purchased from Last Rock pro shop. These are suggestions and in short order you will find your own comfortable way to dress.</p><p>Equipment:</p><p>Little equipment is needed to enjoy this sport. A slider is a piece of Teflon worn on the bottom of your shoe, which allows you to slide smoothly while delivering your rock. The slider can be a separatearticle that attaches to your shoe with an elasticized band or it can be attached directly to your shoe. If your slider is attached to your shoe you will need a gripper, a rubber cover to protect the slider from dirt and to keep you from losing your footing on the ice and on the carpeted area at each end of the sheet.</p><p>A broom is the other piece of equipment that is required; they come in a variety of shapes, textures and handle configurations. If you choose not to purchase a broom, there are “club” brooms available for your use.</p><p>Glossary of Curling Terms:</p><p>Backline: The line across the ice at the back of the house. Stones (or rocks) which are over this line are removed from play.</p><p>Biter: A stone that just touches the outer edge of the circles.</p><p>Blank End: An end in which no points have been scored.</p><p>Bonspiel: A curling competition or tournament.</p><p>Burned Stone: A stone in motion touched by a member of either team or byany part of their equipment. The touched stone may be removed from play.</p><p>Button: The circle at the centre of the house.</p><p>Counter: Any stone in the rings or touching the rings which is a potential point.</p><p>Curl: The amount a rock changes directionwhile travelling overthe ice sheet.</p><p>Delivery: Right handed deliveries are made with the right foot in the left handed hack. Left handed deliveries are made with the left foot in the right handed hack. The delivery and release of the stone is intended to occur in a reasonably straight line from the hack towards the target broom. </p><p>Draw Weight: The momentum required for a stone to reach the house at the farend of the ice sheet.</p><p>End: A portion of a curling game that is completed when each team has thrown eight stones and the score has been decided.</p><p>Free Guard Zone (FGZ): The FGZ is the area between the hog line and the tee line excluding the house. Any stationary stone(s) belonging to the opposition located in the FGZ shall not be removed from play by the delivering team prior to the delivery of the 5<sup>th</sup> stone of the end. </p><p>Guard: A stone that is placed in a position so that it may protect another stone.</p><p>Hacks: The foot-holds at each end of the ice from which the stone is delivered.</p><p>Heavy: A rock delivered with a greater force than necessary.</p><p>Hog Line: A line 10 meters from the hack at each end of the ice.</p><p>Hogged Stone: A stone that does not reach the far hog line. It must be removed from play.</p><p>House: The rings or circles toward which play is directed consisting of a foot ring, 8-foot ring, 4-foot ring and a button.</p><p>In-Turn: The rotation applied to the handle of a stone that causes it to turn and curl in a clockwise direction for a right-handed curler. For a left-handed curler the rotation is counter-clockwise.</p><p>Lead: The first player on a team to deliver a pair of stones for his/her team in each end.</p><p>Light: A rock delivered with insufficient force.</p><p>Out-Turn: The rotation applied to the handle of a stone that causes it to turn and curl in a counter-clockwise direction for a right-handed curler. For a left-handed curler the rotation is clockwise.</p><p>Pebble: A fine spray of water applied to a sheet of curling ice before commencing play.</p><p>Raise: When one stone is bumped ahead by another.</p><p>Roll: The movement of a curling stone after it has struck a stationary stone in play.</p><p>Second: The curler who delivers the second pair of stones for his/her team in each end.</p><p>Sheet: The specific playing surface upon which a curling game is played.</p><p>Shot Rock: At any time during an end, the stone closest to the button.</p><p>Skip: The player who determines the strategy, and directs play for the team. The skip generally but not necessarily delivers the last pair of stones for his/her team in each end.</p><p>Spare: An alternate player or substitute.</p><p>Slider: Slippery material placed on the sole of the shoe, to make it easier to slide on the ice during delivery.</p><p>Stick: Device used for delivery of a stone. The delivery must start from the hack and be released before the hog line.</p><p>Sweeping: The action of moving a broom or brush back and forth in the path of a moving stone. This allows the stone to travel farther and curl less.</p><p>Take Out: Removal of a stone from the playing area by hitting it with another stone.</p><p>Tee Line: The line that passes through the centre of the house parallel to the hog line and backline.</p><p>Third Or Vice-Skip: The third player on a team to throw two stones in each end.  Generally this player acts as the skip when the skip is delivering his/her stones and assists with shot selection decisions.  </p><p>Weight: The amount of force given to the stone during the delivery.</p><p>The Curling Sheet:</p><p><img src=

Safety on the Ice:

Curling is not a dangerous sport but serious injuries can occur if you are not careful. The beginning of the season is when the majority of injuries happen. Ice is very hard and very slippery. It is easy to forget this as we get more comfortable. This is when mistakes happen and injuries can occur. Here are a few suggestions to make the season safe:

  • Make sure your shoes have good grip. If not, invest in a gripper to ensure stability.
  • Wear grippers at all times except when throwing rocks. Learning to sweep with two grippers is safe and easy. 
  • Ensure your grippers fit snugly and are not going to fall off.
  • When you step on the ice to throw be sure to get on with your gripper foot first and not your slider. When you get off the ice after throwing the reverse is true, step off with your slider foot first.
  • Look out for other players when moving rocks around on the ice. Also be aware of rocks are being moved near you and be ready to move safely out of the way.
  • While it is important to stop rocks from running into the hacks do not put yourself at risk to do so.
  • Take things slowly. While it is important to keep a game moving along at a nice clip, if everyone is where they’re supposed to be, it doesn’t have to be a race. Move on the ice at a safe pace.
  • Be aware of emergency procedures at your club and the location of the first aid kit, defibrillator etc. 

Team Composition:

A Team is made up of four players; a Lead, a Second, a Third or Vice, and a Skip.

Lead

The Lead delivers the first two rocks for the team. After the lead rocks have been delivered, (s)he will then sweep the rocks being delivered by the rest of the team. Leads should also place the Skip’s rock in front of the hack when it is the Skip’s turn to deliver their rocks (this helps to maintain the pace of the game).

Second

The Second delivers the next two rocks for their team and sweeps rocks being delivered by the rest of the team. While sweeping, s/he is also trying to determine how far the rock will travel down the ice.

Third/Vice

The Third is responsible for the coin toss with the opposing Third; the winner usually chooses to have “last rock” for the first end and allows the opposing Third to choose rock colour, although the winner of the toss is also entitled to choose rock colour and allow the other team to have last rock. The team without last rock then delivers their rock first. The Third/Vice delivers the third set of two rocks and is also responsible for sweeping the Lead and Second rocks. It is usually the Third who holds the broom when it is the Skip’s turn to deliver their rocks. After the Skip’s rocks have been delivered, it is the duty of the Thirds from both teams to determine the points scored in the end and perform the measure should it not be clear which rock is in scoring position. If a measure is required and you are unsure how to proceed, ask the opposing Third or the Skips for assistance. The Thirds should be the only people in the House at the conclusion of each end. It is also the responsibility of the Third to mark the score on the ice and on the draw sheets located on the boards in the lounge. The third is best positioned to act as a coach and mentor for any novices on the team. In that role he or she should give advice and answer questions on rules, technique, etiquette and strategy.

Skip

The Skip stands at the far end of the sheet and holds the broom for the delivery of the rocks by the other team members. The broom is a visual aide for the person delivering their rock. The positioning of the broom is decided by the Skip’s ability to “read” or understand the movement of the rocks on the ice. Positioning of the broom will be dependent on ice conditions, the type of shot being played, and the position of other rocks in and around the house. The Skip who delivers the last rock in the end is said to have “the Hammer”. The role of the Skip includes: 

  • Making your team aware of curling etiquette.
  • If you observe a member of your team committing a violation of a rule or etiquette gently point out their error. 
  • Setting an example; be courteous and respectful. 
  • Complimenting a good shot by a member of your team.
  • Tailoring your expectations to the ability of your team members. Be considerate of those not quite so talented. 
  • While game strategy is the skip’s responsibility, you should discuss strategy with the Third and be willing to explain your calls to your team members when asked. Strategy decisions should not be drawn out. Taking too much time is unfair on the opposition
  • Knowing the rules so you can assist your team. 

Curling Etiquette:

  • Rules of Play – We subscribe to the rules of the Canadian Curling Association (CCA), casinoextra.fr and the Ontario Curling Association (OCA), casinoextra.fr 
  • Missing a game – If you are unable to play your game, you are responsible for arranging a spare and informing your Skip as early as possible. There is usually a list of spares for your draw, however you may call any member or ask the people who are curling before or after your game.
  • Cancelling your game – If your game needs to be cancelled or rescheduled, the Skip is responsible to inform his/her team and the Skip of the opposing team as early as possible. (S)He should also inform the League Rep.

Before Starting the Game

  • Clean shoes before going on the ice. 
  • Clean brooms over garbage cans so dirt etc. does not fall onto the carpet.
  • Introduce yourself and shake hands with your opponents before the game & wish everyone ‘good curling’.
  • The Third from one team tosses a coin, while the other team’s third makes the call. Whichever team wins the toss has the option of throwing the last rock, or choosing rock colour. The team that wins the toss will usually opt for the advantage of last rock, in which case the other team chooses the colour they want. 

During the Game

  • Be ready to throw when it is your turn.
  • The leads who will be throwing the first rock of the end should prepare themselves and their first rock to throw and not assist in clearing the other rocks after the end is over.                  
  • An eight end game should take no more than two hours to play, a six end game, 1 ½ hours – allow 15 minutes per end. This goal can be achieved if the skips plan their strategy while the opposition is delivering their rocks. All team members should be ready to deliver their rock when it is their turn. As soon as the person delivering the rock before you has released their rock, you can step into the hack, clean your rock and be ready to play as soon as your Skip calls your shot. Keeping the pace of play maintains interest and aids in concentration in the game. The teams using the ice after you will appreciate it also!
  • It is conventional but not necessary to throw the rocks in the order of the numbers on the rocks.
  • Only the skip or third of the delivering team should be in the house. 
  • When your teammate is throwing their rock, sweepers should keep far enough back with their brooms against their bodies so they don't block the sightlines of the thrower. 
  • Similarly, when you have finished sweeping your team's rock and you're walking back down the sheet, keep to the side line. Remember that the other team will be throwing their rock and that the sightlines down the sheet should be clear. 
  • Sweepers should be between the hog lines and to the side of the ice sheet when rocks are delivered so as not to block the view of the opposing player who is throwing.  
  • When an opposing player is in the hack and ready to throw, do not cross the ice or enter the house or in any way interfere with his or her concentration.
  • If you find that you are walking back towards the hack when someone is delivering their rock, you should stand still and remain motionless during the opposing teams’ delivery and while their hand is still on the handle. Remain relatively quiet so the person delivering will not be distracted. Also, keep your broom down and out of the way, but not on the ice surface—the only broom in a stationary position on the ice should belong to the person who has control of the house.
  • It is okay for a Skip to stand behind the other Skip to watch the line, but the Skip behind should not place the broom vertically on the ice, since this may put the thrower off by seeing two brooms! It is a courtesy for the Skip standing behind to position the broom horizontally across the body. 
  • Sweepers should pay attention to their skip’s call for the next curler on their team so they know what is expected for the next shot.
  • When the final stone of an end comes to rest in the house, leads and seconds should remain well outside the house until the Thirds have measured (if necessary), determined the score, and agreed to move stones. Do not move any rock until the Thirds have given the okay. 
  • Compliment your opponent for a good shot. One of the nicest curling traditions is that players and spectators compliment a good shot by either side while not remarking on a poor shot or a competitor’s misfortune.
  • After the end is completed all rocks should be returned to their designated area; being in proper order is not necessary. This will also help keep the game on pace. The Lead who is delivering the first rock in the new end should be getting ready while the rocks are being gathered.

After the Game

  • Both teams shake hands after a game. If people are having a sociable drink after the game, it's considered good etiquette to sit with your opposition. Each member of the winning team offers to buy a beverage for the corresponding position on the other team. Normally later, the other team reciprocates but this is not mandatory.   Drinks are available in our downstairs bar/lounge. Please do not bring alcoholic drinks into the ice area.
  • Arrange rocks in numerical order once the game is complete.

Suggestions for Finishing a Game on Time

  • Be on time. Please be ready to curl your first rock right on time.  If you are playing the first scheduled game of the draw your ice will be ready before you get there. Occasionally the game before you may finish early. Get to the club in time to change and warm up before your start time. When you are late you are holding up seven other players. If you know you may be late, let your Skip know; they can start without you.
  • There may be occasions when you are unable to curl as scheduled. It is your responsibility to get a substitute. Call your skip and give the name of the curler sparing for you or the names of the people you have called. No shows are a no-no!
  • If your team leads off on any particular end, the Lead should gather their rock, clean it and do their pre-shot routine while the Third and the Second put the rocks away.  
  • Players should always be ready to deliver their rock as soon as the Skip asks for it. Do not wait until the Skip places the broom to clean your rock. 
  • Be courteous. Don’t distract the person in the hack. 
  • Sweepers, be sure to walk back to the delivering end as close to the sidelines as possible so as not to block the line of delivery of the next person. 
  • Leads or Seconds, place your Skip’s rock in front of the Hack while the Skip and Third are setting up the Skip’s shot.
  • Skips, keep the game moving by minimizing delays in making decisions. Avoid long conferences. You are in charge of the game. It’s rock science, not rocket science.

 

Sweeping:

  • Any member of the team may sweep their team’s rock up to the T-line; only one sweeper may do so after the rock has crossed the T-line. The opposing team’s rock may only be swept by you after it crosses the T-line.  
  • You are not permitted to “warm up the ice”, i.e. sweep any rock that is stationary.
  • You may only sweep a rock that is in motion. 
  • While sweeping, you will need to communicate to your Skip where you believe the rock will come to rest and sweep the rock accordingly so that it ends up where the Skip has requested (no mean task). 
  • The two team members who are not currently throwing, travel beside and sweep (as necessary) the rock being delivered by their teammate. The purpose of sweeping is to help a rock travel further or keep it straight. To be safe and effective, sweepers should be positioned on opposite sides of the running rock.
  • The Skip or Third is viewing the line of the rock as it travels down the ice. (S)He will call on the sweepers to start or stop sweeping at any given time.  It is difficult for the Skip to judge the speed of the rock. Communication from the sweepers helps the Skip determine where the rock will come to rest.

 

Factors Influencing Shot Selection:

  1. Free Guard Zone (FGZ) Rule —The Free Guard Zone Rule influences shot selection relative to the first four stones of an end and impacts strategy decisions throughout the course of a game. The FGZ Rule provides substantial opportunities for offense including comebacks in the middle and late ends of a game with or without last rock. 
  2. Score—The score in relation to the end you are playing will greatly influence shot election decisions. 
  3. Last Rock—Last rock advantage plays a key role in shot selection decisions. Having last rock advantage may result in a more offensive approach. Not having last rock may dictate a defensive approach. 
  4. Ability—The skills of opponents and teammates required to successfully play both offense and defense are critical to planning strategy and making appropriate shot selection. Knowing the position by position strengths and weaknesses of the team and the opposition will have a great impact on the game strategy. The strategy you design for your team and the shot selections you make during a game should be based on the abilities of the individual players and the team as a unit. 
  5. Ice—Ice conditions will play a key factor in determining the strategy a team is able to apply. Fast, swingy ice will produce optimum playing conditions. Straight ice conditions will restrict the aggressive come around approach and may dictate a raise style game plan. It is important to note that, of these factors, last rock advantage and the relative skills of both the team and the opposing team are the main factors that influence shot selections for the developing curler. 

 

Scoring:

Most club and bonspiel games are eight ends. Competitive games are often ten ends. In each end the rock(s) of the same colour closest to the centre of the house count as one point each. The score and any measuring is determined by the Thirds of both teams; all other players should remain outside the Hog line. 

 

Scoreboard etiquette: While spectators enjoy having the score posted quickly after the completion of an end, curling etiquette does exist in certain situations where delaying or even not posting the score would be considered a sportsmanlike gesture. For example, if after 3 or 4 ends, a team is leading by 7 or more (for example), then further scoring should be postponed until the trailing rink counts an end – please use your judgment. In these situations, it can be considered unsportsmanlike to rush and immediately post the results of an end.

 

The etiquette of conceding a win/loss game: After the completion of any end, a team may concede a game by the conceding skip offering to shake hands with the skip of the winning team. After a team has conceded, they may still play for fun if time allows (no score). If time is short, good etiquette is to concede a game when all chances of winning the game are gone. This will allow the ice crew time to prepare the sheet for the next game to start on time. E.g. If a team needs 4 to tie the game on the 8th end, and by their third’s first stone is not laying at least one, then there is no hope and a skip’s handshake is proper etiquette.

 

At the end of the game, the Third should note the final score and the number of ends won by their team. This information is then recorded on the draw sheet in the lounge. As a courtesy, often the winning Third will record the information for both teams.

 

Port Perry's Scoreboard:

Our club uses Club style scoreboards where the centre numbers on the score board represent the score of the match. The cards hung above or below the center numbers are the ends played and they show the accumulated points scored by the team up to and including that end. The number on the card represents the End. Depending on which team has scored, the end number is hung either under or above the number that represents the total number of points scored to that point in the game.

PORT PERRY CURLING CLUB

 

 

   

[2]

 

[3]

      
 

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

 

[7]

 

[1]

   

[4]

 

[6]

   

Blank Ends [5]

Sample Game:

[1]Yellow scores 3 points in the first end.  [Yellow leads ]

[2]Red scores 4 points in the second end.  [Red leads ]

[3]Red scores 2 points in the third end.  [Red leads ]

[4]Yellow scores 4 points in the fourth end.  [Yellow leads ]

[5]No points were scored (blank end) in the fifth end. The card is hung in the Blank Ends area.  [Yellow leads ]

[6]Yellow scores 2 points in the sixth end.  [Yellow leads ]

[7]Yellow scores 4 points in the seventh end. For a score that is higher than the scoreboard’s center numbers, the end number is posted using a “wrap around”. This indicates the score is twelve higher than the center number.  [Yellow leads ]

[8]The eighth end is in progress.  

 

Competition Scoreboard:

Some clubs and many televised curling events use the International style scoreboard and the score is marked in the same manner as on a baseball scoreboard. The Ends are at the top of the scoreboard. There is a box below the scoreboard containing numbers. The scoring team’s Third chooses the number that corresponds to the number of points scored in each end and hangs it beside the colour of rocks that were in scoring position and under the corresponding End.

Baseball-style scoreboard

Team

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

Final

    Canada

0

2

1

1

0

6

0

0

x

x

10

    Finland

2

0

0

0

1

0

0

1

x

x

4


Источник: [casinoextra.fr]

The winner is the "team" having the highest number of accumulated points at the completion of 10 "ends".

If at the end of the game the "score" is tied, "extra ends" are played until a winner is decided.

Points are scored at the conclusion of each of these "ends" as follows: when each "team" has thrown its eight "stones", the "team" with the "stone" closest to the "tee" wins that "end"; the winning "team" is then awarded one point for each of its own "stones" lying closer to the "tee" than the opponent's closest "stone".

Only "stones" that are in the "house" are considered in the scoring. A "stone" is in the "house" if it lies within the "twelve foot" ( m) zone or any portion of its edge lies over the edge of the ring. Since the bottom of the stone is rounded, a "stone" just barely in the "house" will not have any actual contact with the ring, which will pass under the rounded edge of the "stone", but it still counts; this type of "stone" is known as a "biter".

If at the end of an "end" no "stone" is in the "house" no team scores in this "end"; this situation is called "blank end".

It may not be obvious to the eye which of two "stones" is closer to the "tee" or if a "stone" is actually biting or not; there are specialized devices to make these determinations, but these cannot be brought out until after an "end" is completed. Therefore, a "team" may make strategic decisions during an "end" based on assumptions of stone position that turn out to be incorrect.

The score is marked on a "scoreboard".

Источник: [casinoextra.fr]

GAMEPLAY

The purpose of the game is to score points by getting stones closer to the house center, or the "button", than the other team&#;s stones. Players from either team alternate in taking shots from the far side of the sheet. An end is complete when all eight rocks from each team have been delivered, a total of sixteen stones. If the teams are tied at the end of the game, play continues for as many ends as may be required to break the tie. The winner is the team with the highest score after all ends have been completed (see Scoring below). A game may be conceded if considered unwinnable.

International competitive games are ten ends, so most of the national championships that send a representative to the World Championships or Olympics also play ten ends. However, there is a movement on the World Curling Tour to make the games only eight ends. Most tournaments on that tour are eight ends, as are the vast majority of recreational games.

At the Winter Olympic Games a curler from Team Canada delivers a stone, while his teammates look on, ready to begin sweeping. The curler uses his broom to help keep his balance during delivery.

In international competition, each side is given 73 minutes to complete all of its throws. Each team is also allowed two second timeouts per end game. If extra ends are required, each team is allowed 10 minutes of playing time to complete its throws and one added second timeout for each extra end.

Delivery

The process of sliding a stone down the sheet is known as the delivery.

The skip, or the captain of the team, will usually determine the required weight, turn, and line of the stone. These will be influenced by the tactics at this point in the game, which may involve taking-out, blocking or tapping another stone.

  • The weight of the stone is its velocity, which depends on the leg drive of the delivery rather than the arm.
  • The turn, handle, or curl is the rotation of the stone, which gives it a curved trajectory.
  • The line is the direction of the throw ignoring the effect of the turn.

The skip may communicate the weight, turn, line, and other tactics by calling or tapping a broom on the ice. In the case of a takeout, guard, or a tap, the skip will indicate the stones involved.

Before delivery, the running surface of the stone is wiped clean and the path across the ice swept with the broom if necessary, because any dirt on the bottom of a stone or in its path can alter the trajectory and ruin the shot. Intrusion by a foreign object is called a pick up or pick.

Players must push out of the hack to deliver their stones.

The thrower throws from the hack. Another player, usually the skip, is stationed behind the button to determine the tactics, weight, turn, and line, and the other two may sweep in front of the stone to influence the trajectory (see Sweeping, below). The players, with the exception of the skip, take turns throwing and sweeping; when one player (e.g., the lead) throws, the players not throwing (the second and third) sweep. When the skip throws, the third, or vice-skip, takes his role.

The thrower&#;s gripper shoe (with the non-slippery sole) is positioned against one of the hacks; for a right-handed curler the right foot is placed against the left hack and vice-versa for a left-hander. The thrower, now in the hack, lines the body up with shoulders square to the skip&#;s broom at the far end for line.

The stone is placed in front of the foot now in the hack. Rising slightly from the hack, the thrower pulls the stone back to the toe (some older curlers may actually raise the stone in this backward movement) then lunges smoothly out from the hack pushing the stone ahead while the slider foot is moved in front of the gripper foot, which trails behind. The thrust from this lunge determines the weight and hence the distance the stone will travel. While not compulsory, most curlers deliver the stone while sliding out from the hack. Balance may be assisted by a broom held in the free hand with the back of the broom down so that it slides.

The stone is released as the thrower&#;s momentum wanes, or the hog line is approached, at which point the turn is imparted by a slight clockwise or anti-clockwise twist of the handle from around the two or ten o&#;clock position to the twelve o&#;clock on release. A typical rate of turn is about 2½ rotations before coming to a rest.

The stone must be released before its front edge crosses the near hog line, and it must clear the far hog line or else be removed from play (hogged); an exception is made if a stone fails to come to rest beyond the far hog line after rebounding from a stone in play just past the hog line. The release rule is rarely enforced in club play unless abuse is suspected. However, in major tournaments it is strictly enforced; the "eye on the hog" sensor in the stone will indicate whether the stone has been legally thrown or not. The lights on the stone handle will either light up green, indicating that the stone has been legally thrown, or red, in which case the illegally thrown stone will be immediately pulled from play instead of waiting for the stone to come to rest.

Sweeping

The skip of Team Sweden joins the front end in sweeping a stone into the house at the Winter Olympic Games in Vancouver

After the stone is delivered, its trajectory is still influenced by the two sweepers under instruction from the skip. Sweeping is done for two reasons: to reduce friction underneath the stone, and to decrease the amount of curl. The stones curl more as they slow down, so sweeping early in travel tends to increase distance as well as straighten the path, and sweeping after sideways motion is established can increase the sideways distance. When sweeping, pressure and speed of the brush head are key in slightly increasing the layer of moisture that builds up under the stone.

One of the basic strategy aspects of curling is knowing when to sweep. When the ice in front of the stone is swept, a stone will usually travel both farther and straighter. In some situations, one of the two alterations in path is not desirable. For example, a stone may have too much weight, but require sweeping to prevent curling into a guard. The team must decide which is better: getting by the guard but traveling too far, or hitting the guard.

Much of the yelling that goes on during a curling game is the skip calling the line of the shot and the sweepers calling the weight. The skip evaluates the path of the stone and calls to the sweepers to sweep as necessary to maintain the intended track. The sweepers themselves are responsible for judging the weight of the stone, ensuring the length of travel is correct and communicating the weight of the stone back to the skip. Some teams use stopwatch timing, from back line to the nearest hog line as a sweeping aid. Many teams use the Number System to communicate in which of 10 playable zones it is estimated the stone will stop.

Usually, the two sweepers will be on opposite sides of the stone&#;s path, although depending on which side the sweepers&#; strengths lie this may not always be the case. Speed and pressure are vital to sweeping. In gripping the broom, one hand should be one third of the way from the top (non-brush end) of the handle while the other hand should be one third of the way from the head of the broom. The angle of the broom to the ice should be so that the most force possible can be exerted on the ice. The precise amount of pressure may vary from relatively light brushing ("just cleaning" - to ensure debris will not alter the stone&#;s path) to maximum-pressure scrubbing.

Sweeping is allowed anywhere on the ice up to the tee line, as long as it is only for one&#;s own team stones. Once the leading edge of a team stone crosses the tee line only one player may sweep it. Additionally, when a stone crosses the tee line, one player from the other team is allowed to sweep it. This is the only case that a stone may be swept by an opposing team member. In international rules, this player must be the skip; or if the skip is throwing, then the sweeping player must be the third.

Burning a stone

Occasionally, players may accidentally touch a stone with their broom or a body part. This is often referred to as burning a stone. Players touching a stone in such a manner are expected to call their own infraction as a matter of good sportsmanship. Touching a stationary stone when no stones are in motion (there is no delivery in progress) is not an infraction (unless the stationary stone is struck in such a manner that its position is altered), and is a common way for the skip to indicate a stone that is to be taken out.

When a stone is touched when stones are in play, the remedies vary between placing the stones as they end up after the touch, replacing the stones as they would have been if no stone were touched, or removal of the touched stone from play. In non-officiated league play, the skip of the non-offending team has the final say on where the stones are placed after the infraction.

Types of shots

Two ways to get the end with the last stone, playing a draw

Many different types of shots are used to carefully place stones for strategic or tactical reasons; they fall into three fundamental categories as follows:

Guards are thrown in front of the house in the free guard zone, usually to protect the shot-rock (the stone closest to the button at the time) or to make the opposing team&#;s shot difficult. Guard shots include the centre-guard, on the centreline and the corner-guards to the left or right sides of the centre line. See Free Guard Zone below.

Draws are thrown only to reach the house. Draw shots include raise and angle-raise, come-around, and freeze shots.

Takeouts are intended to remove stones from play and include the peel, hit-and-roll and double shots.

Free guard zone

Until four stones have been played (two from each side), stones in the free guard zone (those stones left in the area between the hog and tee lines, excluding the house) may not be removed by an opponent&#;s stone (although they can be moved as long as they are not taken out of play). These are known as guard rocks. If the guard rocks are removed, they are replaced to where they were before the shot was thrown, and the opponent&#;s stone is removed from play and cannot be replayed. This rule is known as the four-rock rule or the free guard zone rule (for a while in Canada, a "three-rock rule" was in place, but that rule has been replaced by the four-rock rule).

Originally, the Modified Moncton Rule was developed from a suggestion made by Russ Howard for the Moncton cashspiel (with the richest prize ever awarded at the time in a tournament) in Moncton, New Brunswick, in January "Howard&#;s Rule" (also known as the Moncton Rule), used for the tournament and based on a practice drill his team used, had the first four rocks in play unable to be removed no matter where they were at any time during the end. This method of play altered slightly and adopted as a Four-rock Free Guard Zone for international competition shortly after. Canada kept to the traditional rules until a three-rock Free Guard Zone rule was adopted, starting in the season. After several years of having the three-rock rule used for the Canadian championships and the winners then having to adjust to the four-rock rule in the World Championships, the Canadian Curling Association adopted the now-standard Free Guard Zone in the season.

This rule, a relatively recent addition to curling, was added in response to a strategy of "peeling" opponents&#; guard stones (knocking them out of play at an angle that caused the shooter&#;s stone to also roll out of play, leaving no stones on the ice). A team in the lead would often employ this strategy during the game. By knocking all stones out, the opponents could at best score one point (if they had the hammer). Alternatively, the team with the hammer could peel rock after rock, which would blank the end, keeping the last rock advantage for another end. This strategy had developed (mostly in Canada) as ice-makers had become skilled at creating a predictable ice surface and the adoption of brushes allowed greater control over the rock. While a sound strategy, this made for an unexciting game. Observers at the time noted that if two teams equally skilled in the peel game faced each other on good ice, the outcome of the game would be predictable from who won the coin flip to have last rock (or had earned it in the schedule) at the beginning of the game. The Brier was considered by many curling fans as boring to watch because of the near-constant peeling and the quick adoption of the Free Guard Zone the following year reflected how disliked this aspect of the game had become.

One strategy that has been developed by curlers in response to the Free Guard Zone (Kevin Martin from Alberta is one of the best examples) is the "tick" game, where a shot is made attempting to knock (tick) the guard to the side, far enough that it is difficult or impossible to use but still remaining in play while the shot itself goes out of play. The effect is functionally identical to peeling the guard but significantly harder, as a shot that hits the guard too hard (knocking it out of play) results in its being replaced, while not hitting it hard enough can result in its still being tactically useful for the opposition. There&#;s also a greater chance that the shot will miss the guard entirely because of the greater accuracy required to make the shot. Because of the difficulty of making this type of shot, only the best teams will normally attempt it, and it does not dominate the game the way the peel formerly did. Steve Gould from Manitoba popularized ticks played across the face. These are easier to make because they impart less speed on the object stone, therefore increasing the chance that it remains in play even if a bigger chunk of it is hit.

Hammer

Last-rock or last-stone advantage in an end is called the hammer. Before the game, teams typically decide who gets the hammer in the first end either by chance (such as a coin toss), by a "draw-to-the-button" contest, where a representative of each team shoots a single stone to see who gets closer to the centre of the rings, or, particularly in tournament settings like the Winter Olympics, by a comparison of each team&#;s win-loss record. In all subsequent ends, the hammer belongs to the team that did not score in the preceding end. In the event that neither team scores, the hammer remains with the same team. Naturally, it is easier to score points with the hammer than without; in tournament play, the team with the hammer generally tries to score two or more points. If only one point is possible, the skip will often try to avoid scoring at all in order to retain the hammer until the next end, when two or more points may lie. This is called a blank end. Scoring without the hammer is commonly referred to as stealing, or a steal, and is much more difficult.

Strategy

Curling is a game of strategy, tactics and skill. The strategy depends on the team&#;s skill, the opponent&#;s skill, the conditions of the ice, the score of the game, how many ends remain and whether the team has last-stone advantage (the hammer). A team may play an end aggressively or defensively. Aggressive playing will put a lot of stones in play by throwing mostly draws; this makes for an exciting game and is very risky but the reward can be very great. Defensive playing will throw a lot of hits preventing a lot of stones in play; this tends to be less exciting and less risky. A good drawing team will usually opt to play aggressively, while a good hitting team will opt to play defensively.

Diagram of the play area in curling, showing the four-foot zone, corner guard, and centre line guard

If a team does not have the hammer in an end, it will opt to try to clog up the four-foot zone in the house to deny the opposing team access to the button. This can be done by throwing "centre line" guards in front of the house on the centre line, which can be tapped into the house later or drawn around. If a team has the hammer, they will try to keep this four-foot zone free so that they have access to the button area at all times. A team with the hammer may throw a corner guard as their first stone of an end placed in front of the house but outside the four-foot zone to utilize the free guard zone. Corner guards are key for a team to score two points in an end, because they can either draw around it later or hit and roll behind it, making the opposing team&#;s shot to remove it more difficult.

Ideally, the strategy in an end for a team with the hammer is to score two points or more. Scoring one point is often a wasted opportunity, as they will then lose last-rock advantage for the next end. If a team cannot score two points, they will often attempt to "blank an end" by removing any leftover opposition rocks and rolling out; or, if there are no opposition rocks, just throwing the rock through the house so that no team scores any points, and the team with the hammer can try again the next end to score two or more with it. Generally, a team without the hammer would want to either force the team with the hammer to only one point (so that they can get the hammer back) or "steal" the end by scoring one or more points of their own.

Generally, the larger the lead a team will have in a game, the more defensively they should play. By hitting all of the opponent&#;s stones, it removes opportunities for their getting multiple points, therefore defending the lead. If the leading team is quite comfortable, leaving their own stones in play can also be dangerous. Guards can be drawn around by the other team, and stones in the house can be tapped back (if they are in front of the tee line) or frozen onto (if they are behind the tee line). A frozen stone is difficult to remove, because it is "frozen" (in front of and touching) to the opponents stone. At this point, a team will opt for "peels", meaning that the stones they throw will be to not only hit their opposition stones, but to roll out of play as well. Peels are hits that are thrown with the most amount of power.

Conceding a game

It is not uncommon at any level for a losing team to terminate the match before all ends are completed if it believes it no longer has a realistic chance of winning. Playoff games at national and world championships require eight ends to be completed before allowing a losing team to concede in this manner. Competitive games will usually end once the losing team has "run out of rocks"—that is, once it has fewer stones in play and/or available for play than the number of points needed to tie the game in the final end.

When a team feels it is impossible or near impossible to win a game, they will usually shake hands with the opposing team to concede defeat. This may occur at any point during the game, but usually happens near the final end. In the Winter Olympics, a team may concede after completing six ends of a round-robin game, but can only concede after finishing eight ends during the knockout stages.

Measuring which stone is closest to the centre of the house

Unlike other sports, there is no negative connotation associated with conceding in curling. In fact, in many competitions, a team is required to concede when it is mathematically impossible for them to tie a game. In more social situations, it is often considered a breach of etiquette (or at least looked down upon) to keep playing when the game is well out of reach. Some skips will even concede before throwing their final rock if they feel that a positive outcome will be entirely based on luck as opposed to skill.

Dispute resolution

Most decisions about rules are left to the skips, although in official tournaments, decisions may be left to the officials. However, all scoring disputes are handled by the vice skip. No players other than the vice skip from each team should be in the house while score is being determined. In tournament play, the most frequent circumstance in which a decision has to be made by someone other than the vice skip is the failure of the vice skips to agree on which stone is closest to the button. An independent official (supervisor at Canadian and World championships) then measures the distances using a specially designed device that pivots at the centre of the button. When no independent officials are available, the vice skips measure the distances.

Scoring

A typical curling scoreboard used at clubs, which use a method of scoring different from the ones used on television

The winner is the team having the highest number of accumulated points at the completion of ten ends. Points are scored at the conclusion of each of these ends as follows: when each team has thrown its eight stones, the team with the stone closest to the button wins that end; the winning team is then awarded one point for each of its own stones lying closer to the button than the opponent&#;s closest stone.

Only stones that are in the house are considered in the scoring. A stone is in the house if it lies within the foot ( m) zone or any portion of its edge lies over the edge of the ring. Since the bottom of the stone is rounded, a stone just barely in the house will not have any actual contact with the ring, which will pass under the rounded edge of the stone, but it still counts. This type of stone is known as a biter.

It may not be obvious to the eye which of two rocks is closer to the button (center) or if a rock is actually biting or not. There are specialized devices to make these determinations, but these cannot be brought out until after an end is completed. Therefore, a team may make strategic decisions during an end based on assumptions of rock position that turn out to be incorrect.

The score is marked on a scoreboard, of which there are two types; the baseball type and the club scoreboard.

The baseball-type scoreboard was created for televised games for audiences not familiar with the club scoreboard. The ends are marked by columns 1 through 10 (or 11 for the possibility of an extra end to break ties) plus an additional column for the total. Below this are two rows, one for each team, containing the team&#;s score for that end and their total score in the right hand column.

The club scoreboard is traditional and used in most curling clubs. Scoring on this board only requires the use of (up to) 11 digit cards, whereas with baseball-type scoring an unknown number of multiples of the digits (especially low digits like 1) may be needed. The numbered centre row represents all possible accumulated scores, and the numbers placed in the team rows represent the end in which that team achieved that cumulative score. If the red team scores three points in the first end (called a three-ender), then a 1 (indicating the first end) is placed beside the number 3 in the red row. If they score two more in the second end, then a 2 will be placed beside the 5 in the red row, indicating that the red team has five points in total (3+2). This scoreboard works because only one team can get points in an end. However, some confusion may arise if neither team scores points in an end, this is called a blank end. The blank end numbers are usually listed in the farthest column on the right in the row of the team that has the hammer (last rock advantage), or on a special spot for blank ends.

The following example illustrates the difference between the two types. The example illustrates the men&#;s final at the Winter Olympics.

Team12345678910Final
 Canada02110600xx10
 Finland20001001xx4
 Canada 234     6      
Points123456789101112131415Blank ends
 Finland 158           7

Eight points – all the rocks thrown by one team counting – is the highest score possible in an end, and is known as an "eight-ender" or "snowman". Scoring an eight-ender against a relatively competent team is very difficult; in curling, it is considered the equivalent of pitching a perfect game in baseball. Probably the best-known snowman came at the Players&#; Championships. Future () World Champion Kelly Scott scored eight points in one of her games against World bronze medalist Cathy King.


Text & images taken from Wikipedia 05/29/

Text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., a non-profit organization.

Источник: [casinoextra.fr]

Curling club scoreboard - was

Alternate     

 A registered, non-playing member of the team who is eligible to substitute for one of the competing players.    

Away End     

 The end of the sheet to which the first stone of a game is delivered.

Back Board / Bumper     

 Material (e.g. foam or wood) placed at the end (perimeter) of each sheet of ice.

Back House Weight    

 The speed given to a stone at delivery so that it will just reach the back of the house.  

Back Line    

 A line at the back of the house, extending across the width of the sheet, which is parallel to and located m. (6 ft.) from each tee line.

Back of the House   

The area within the house that lies between the tee line and the back line.

Biter

A stone that just touches the outer edge of the outside circle of the house.


Blank End

An end resulting in no score for either team.


Bonspiel

A curling competition or tournament.


Brush (Broom)

A device used by players to sweep/clean the ice in front of a moving stone.


Button

The small circle at the centre of the house.


Burned Stone

A stone in motion touched by a player or any part of a players equipment.


Centre Line

The line dividing the playing surface down the middle. It joins the midpoints of the tee lines and extends m. (12 ft.) beyond the centre of each tee line.


CirclesSee definition: House.


Competition

Any number of teams playing games to determine a winner.


Come Around

A shot that curls behind another stone.


Counter

Any stone in or touching the house and is considered a potential point.


Courtesy Line

A line indicating where the sweepers from the non-delivering team are allowed to stand in order to ensure that an umpire can view the hog line and to prevent distraction of a delivering player.


Curl

The curved path of a stone as it travels down the sheet of ice.


Delivering End

The end of the sheet from which the stones are being delivered.


Delivering Team

The team that is currently in control of the playing area, and scheduled to deliver the next stone.


Delivery

The motion a player makes when playing a curling stone.


Delivery Stick

A device which attaches to the handle of the stone and acts as an extension of the arm/hand during the delivery process.


Displaced Stone

A stationary stone that has been moved to a new location.


Divider Material

(e.g. foam or wood) used to separate the sheets of curling ice.


Double Takeout

A stone that removes two of the opponents stones from play.


Draw

A stone which stops inside or in front of the house.


Draw Raise

A stone that bumps another stone into the house.


Draw Shot Challenge (DSC)

The calculation made by taking the average distance of the Last Stone Draws (LSD), excluding the least favourable LSD, and used, if required, to assist in the determination of ranking after a round robin.


Draw Weight

The momentum required for a delivered stone to reach the house at the playing end.


Electronic Hog Line Device

A device that indicated if a stone was released by a player before the stone reached the hog line at the delivering end.


End

A portion of a curling game that is completed when each team has thrown eight stones and/or the score has been decided.


Equipment

Anything that is worn or carried by a player.


Extra End

An additional end played to break a tie at the end of regulation play.


External Force

An occurrence not caused by either team.


First Player

The first curler on a team to deliver two stones in each end.


Fourth Player

The fourth curler on a team to deliver two stones in each end.


Free Guard Zone (FGZ)

The area at the playing end, between the hog line and the tee line, but excluding the house.


Freeze

A form of a draw shot that stops directly up against another stone.


Front House Weight

The momentum required for a delivered stone to reach the front part of the house at the playing end.


Game

Two teams playing a specified number of ends to determine a winner.


Guard

A stone that is placed in a position so that it may protect another stone.


Hack

The foot-hold at each end of the ice which is used by a player to start the delivery of a curling stone.


Hack Line

A small line m. (1 ft. 6 in.) parallel to the tee line, at each end of the centre line.


Hack Weight

The momentum required for a delivered stone to reach the hack at the playing end.


Handle

The part of a curling stone that a player grips in order to deliver.


Hammer

A term used to describe the stone which will be the last stone delivered in that end.


Heavy

A stone delivered with a greater speed than necessary.


Hit

A take-out. Removal of a stone from the playing area by hitting it with another stone.


Hit and Roll

A stone that knocks an opponent's stone out of play, and then rolls to another position in play.


Hog Line

A line extending across the width of the sheet that is parallel to and located m. (21 ft.) from each tee line.


Hog Line Violation

A stone that is removed from play for the end, because it was not released before it reached the hog line at the delivering end.


Hogged Stone

A stone that is removed from play for the end, because after being delivered, it did not come to rest completely beyond the inside edge of the hog line at the playing end.


Home End

The end of the sheet from which the first stone of a game is delivered.


House

The area within the concentric circles at each end of the sheet.


Hurry

A command which instructs players to sweep harder.


Ice Surface

The complete ice area that is within the perimeters of the curling sheet.


In the Process of Delivery

The sequence of play that begins when the delivering player is positioned in the hack and concludes when the stone is released.


In-turn

The rotation applied to the handle of a stone by a right handed curler which causes the stone to rotate in a clockwise manner.


Last Stone Draw (LSD)

A contest conducted at the conclusion of a teams pre-game practice in which each team delivers a single stone to the tee at the home end. The resulting distance is measured and used to determine which team has the choice of delivering the first or second stone in the first end.


Lead

The first player on a team to deliver two stones in each end.


Mathematically Eliminated

The status of a team that has a combined total of stones left to be delivered and/or remaining in play that is less than the number needed to produce either a tie or a win.


Measuring Device

An instrument that determines which stone is closer to the centre of the house (Tee), or whether a stone is in the house.


Moving Stone

A stone in motion either from a delivery or from being struck by another stone.


Original Position of a Stone

The location on the ice where a stone rested prior to its being displaced.


Out-of-play Position

The location of a stone that is not in play (e.g. one which has touched a side line, or crossed the back line).


Out-turn

The rotation applied to the handle of a stone by a right handed curler which causes the stone to rotate in a counter-clockwise manner.


Pebble

The water droplets applied to a sheet of ice before commencing play. These droplets freeze, which then reduces the friction between the ice and the stones.


Peel

A shot designed to remove a guard.


Playing End

The end of the sheet to which the stones are being delivered.


Point

At the completion of an end, one is awarded to a team for each of its own stones located in or touching the house that is closer to the tee than any stone of the opposition.


Port

An opening, or gap, between stones.


Positioned Stones

In Mixed Doubles games, the two stones that are placed in designated positions prior to the start of each end.


Raise

A type of draw which bumps forward another stone.


Raise Takeout

A delivered stone hits a stationary stone, which then starts to move and it hits a third stone out of play.


Rings See definition: House.


Rock See definition: Stone.


Roll

The sideways movement of a curling stone after it has struck a stationary stone.


Round Robin

A competition in which each team plays all the other teams.


Score

The number of points received by a team in an end.


Scoring

A team scores one point for each of its stones that is within the house and closer to the tee than any stone of the opposing team.


Second Player

The second curler on a team to deliver two stones in each end.


Sheet

The specific ice surface upon which a curling game is played.


Shot (stone or rock)

At any time during an end, the stone closest to the tee.


Side Line

A line placed at the side (perimeter) of each sheet of ice.


Skip

The player who directs play for the team.


Slider

Slippery material placed on the sole of the sliding shoe, which makes it easier to slide on the ice.


Spare See definition: Alternate.


Stationary Stone

A stone in play which is not in motion.


Stone

Also known as a rock, a curling stone is made of granite and is delivered by the players in a curling game.


Stone Set in Motion

A stationary stone hit by another stone which causes it to move.


Sweeping

The action of moving a broom or brush back and forth in front of the path of a moving stone to clean or polish the ice surface.


Swingy Ice

The condition of the ice or stones causing the stones to have excessive curl.


Takeout

Removal of a stone from the playing area by hitting it with another stone.


Team

Four players competing together. A team may include a fifth player (to act as an alternate) and a casinoextra.fr Doubles have one male and one female player, and may include a coach.

Tee

The exact centre of the house.


Tee Line

A line extending across the width of the sheet that passes through the centre of the house parallel to the hog line and backline.


Third Player

The third curler on a team to deliver two stones in each end.


Time-Out

Stoppage of play called by a team or umpire.


Top of the House

The area within the house that lies between the hog line and the tee line.


Umpire

The person(s) responsible for the conduct of the game in accordance with the rules.


Vice-Skip

(Mate or Acting Skip) The player who directs play for the team when it is the Skip's turn to deliver,


Weight

The amount of force/speed given to the stone during the delivery.


Wheelchair Lines

Two lines that run from the hog line to the outermost edge of the nearest circle of the casinoextra.frhair curlers are allowed to start their delivery with the stone placed between these lines.

 

Source: casinoextra.fr 

Источник: [casinoextra.fr]

GAMEPLAY

The purpose of the game is to score points by getting stones closer to the house center, or the "button", than the other team&#;s stones. Players from either team alternate in taking shots from the far side of the sheet. An end is complete when all eight rocks from each team have been delivered, a total of sixteen stones. If the teams are tied at the end of the game, play continues for as many ends as may be required to break the tie. The winner is the team with the highest score after all ends have been completed (see Scoring below). A game may be conceded if considered unwinnable.

International competitive games are ten ends, so most of the national championships that send a representative to the World Championships or Olympics also play ten ends. However, there is a movement on the World Curling Tour to make the games only eight ends. Most tournaments on that tour are eight ends, as are the vast majority of recreational games.

At the Winter Olympic Games a curler from Team Canada delivers a stone, while his teammates look on, ready to begin sweeping. The curler uses his broom to help keep his balance during delivery.

In international competition, each side is given 73 minutes to complete all of its throws. Each team is also allowed two second timeouts per end game. If extra ends are required, each team is allowed 10 minutes of playing time to complete its throws and one added second timeout for each extra end.

Delivery

The process of sliding a stone down the sheet is known as the delivery.

The skip, or the captain of the team, will usually determine the required weight, turn, and line of the stone. These will be influenced by the tactics at this point in the game, which may involve taking-out, blocking or tapping another stone.

  • The weight of the stone is its velocity, which depends on the leg drive of the delivery rather than the arm.
  • The turn, handle, or curl is the rotation of the stone, which gives it a curved trajectory.
  • The line is the direction of the throw ignoring the effect of the turn.

The skip may communicate the weight, turn, line, and other tactics by calling or tapping a broom on the ice. In the case of a takeout, guard, or a tap, the skip will indicate the stones involved.

Before delivery, the running surface of the stone is wiped clean and the path across the ice swept with the broom if necessary, because any dirt on the bottom of a stone or in its path can alter the trajectory and ruin the shot. Intrusion by a foreign object is called a pick up or pick.

Players must push out of the hack to deliver their stones.

The thrower throws from the hack. Another player, usually the skip, is stationed behind the button to determine the tactics, weight, turn, and line, and the other two may sweep in front of the stone to influence the trajectory (see Sweeping, below). The players, with the exception of the skip, take turns throwing and sweeping; when one player (e.g., the lead) throws, the players not throwing (the second and third) sweep. When the skip throws, the third, or vice-skip, takes his role.

The thrower&#;s gripper shoe (with the non-slippery sole) is positioned against one of the hacks; for a right-handed curler the right foot is placed against the left hack and vice-versa for a left-hander. The thrower, now in the hack, lines the body up with shoulders square to the skip&#;s broom at the far end for line.

The stone is placed in front of the foot now in the hack. Rising slightly from the hack, the thrower pulls the stone back to the toe (some older curlers may actually raise the stone in this backward movement) then lunges smoothly out from the hack pushing the stone ahead while the slider foot is moved in front of the gripper foot, which trails behind. The thrust from this lunge determines the weight and hence the distance the stone will travel. While not compulsory, most curlers deliver the stone while sliding out from the hack. Balance may be assisted by a broom held in the free hand with the back of the broom down so that it slides.

The stone is released as the thrower&#;s momentum wanes, or the hog line is approached, at which point the turn is imparted by a slight clockwise or anti-clockwise twist of the handle from around the two or ten o&#;clock position to the twelve o&#;clock on release. A typical rate of turn is about 2½ rotations before coming to a rest.

The stone must be released before its front edge crosses the near hog line, and it must clear the far hog line or else be removed from play (hogged); an exception is made if a stone fails to come to rest beyond the far hog line after rebounding from a stone in play just past the hog line. The release rule is rarely enforced in club play unless abuse is suspected. However, in major tournaments it is strictly enforced; the "eye on the hog" sensor in the stone will indicate whether the stone has been legally thrown or not. The lights on the stone handle will either light up green, indicating that the stone has been legally thrown, or red, in which case the illegally thrown stone will be immediately pulled from play instead of waiting for the stone to come to rest.

Sweeping

The skip of Team Sweden joins the front end in sweeping a stone into the house at the Winter Olympic Games in Vancouver

After the stone is delivered, its trajectory is still influenced by the two sweepers under instruction from the skip. Sweeping is done for two reasons: to reduce friction underneath the stone, and to decrease the amount of curl. The stones curl more as they slow down, so sweeping early in travel tends to increase distance as well as straighten the path, and sweeping after sideways motion is established can increase the sideways distance. When sweeping, pressure and speed of the brush head are key in slightly increasing the layer of moisture that builds up under the stone.

One of the basic strategy aspects of curling is knowing when to sweep. When the ice in front of the stone is swept, a stone will usually travel both farther and straighter. In some situations, one of the two alterations in path is not desirable. For example, a stone may have too much weight, but require sweeping to prevent curling into a guard. The team must decide which is better: getting by the guard but traveling too far, or hitting the guard.

Much of the yelling that goes on during a curling game is the skip calling the line of the shot and the sweepers calling the weight. The skip evaluates the path of the stone and calls to the sweepers to sweep as necessary to maintain the intended track. The sweepers themselves are responsible for judging the weight of the stone, ensuring the length of travel is correct and communicating the weight of the stone back to the skip. Some teams use stopwatch timing, from back line to the nearest hog line as a sweeping aid. Many teams use the Number System to communicate in which of 10 playable zones it is estimated the stone will stop.

Usually, the two sweepers will be on opposite sides of the stone&#;s path, although depending on which side the sweepers&#; strengths lie this may not always be the case. Speed and pressure are vital to sweeping. In gripping the broom, one hand should be one third of the way from the top (non-brush end) of the handle while the other hand should be one third of the way from the head of the broom. The angle of the broom to the ice should be so that the most force possible can be exerted on the ice. The precise amount of pressure may vary from relatively light brushing ("just cleaning" - to ensure debris will not alter the stone&#;s path) to maximum-pressure scrubbing.

Sweeping is allowed anywhere on the ice up to the tee line, as long as it is only for one&#;s own team stones. Once the leading edge of a team stone crosses the tee line only one player may sweep it. Additionally, when a stone crosses the tee line, one player from the other team is allowed to sweep it. This is the only case that a stone may be swept by an opposing team member. In international rules, this player must be the skip; or if the skip is throwing, then the sweeping player must be the third.

Burning a stone

Occasionally, players may accidentally touch a stone with their broom or a body part. This is often referred to as burning a stone. Players touching a stone in such a manner are expected to call their own infraction as a matter of good sportsmanship. Touching a stationary stone when no stones are in motion (there is no delivery in progress) is not an infraction (unless the stationary stone is struck in such a manner that its position is altered), and is a common way for the skip to indicate a stone that is to be taken out.

When a stone is touched when stones are in play, the remedies vary between placing the stones as they end up after the touch, replacing the stones as they would have been if no stone were touched, or removal of the touched stone from play. In non-officiated league play, the skip of the non-offending team has the final say on where the stones are placed after the infraction.

Types of shots

Two ways to get the end with the last stone, playing a draw

Many different types of shots are used to carefully place stones for strategic or tactical reasons; they fall into three fundamental categories as follows:

Guards are thrown in front of the house in the free guard zone, usually to protect the shot-rock (the stone closest to the button at the time) or to make the opposing team&#;s shot difficult. Guard shots include the centre-guard, on the centreline and the corner-guards to the left or right sides of the centre line. See Free Guard Zone below.

Draws are thrown only to reach the house. Draw shots include raise and angle-raise, come-around, and freeze shots.

Takeouts are intended to remove stones from play and include the peel, hit-and-roll and double shots.

Free guard zone

Until four stones have been played (two from each side), stones in the free guard zone (those stones left in the area between the hog and tee lines, excluding the house) may not be removed by an opponent&#;s stone (although they can be moved as long as they are not taken out of play). These are known as guard rocks. If the guard rocks are removed, they are replaced to where they were before the shot was thrown, and the opponent&#;s stone is removed from play and cannot be replayed. This rule is known as the four-rock rule or the free guard zone rule (for a while in Canada, a "three-rock rule" was in place, but that rule has been replaced by the four-rock rule).

Originally, the Modified Moncton Rule was developed from a suggestion made by Russ Howard for the Moncton cashspiel (with the richest prize ever awarded at the time in a tournament) in Moncton, New Brunswick, in January "Howard&#;s Rule" (also known as the Moncton Rule), used for the tournament and based on a practice drill his team used, had the first four rocks in play unable to be removed no matter where they were at any time during the end. This method of play altered slightly and adopted as a Four-rock Free Guard Zone for international competition shortly after. Canada kept to the traditional rules until a three-rock Free Guard Zone rule was adopted, starting in the season. After several years of having the three-rock rule used for the Canadian championships and the winners then having to adjust to the four-rock rule in the World Championships, the Canadian Curling Association adopted the now-standard Free Guard Zone in the season.

This rule, a relatively recent addition to curling, was added in response to a strategy of "peeling" opponents&#; guard stones (knocking them out of play at an angle that caused the shooter&#;s stone to also roll out of play, leaving no stones on the ice). A team in the lead would often employ this strategy during the game. By knocking all stones out, the opponents could at best score one point (if they had the hammer). Alternatively, the team with the hammer could peel rock after rock, which would blank the end, keeping the last rock advantage for another end. This strategy had developed (mostly in Canada) as ice-makers had become skilled at creating a predictable ice surface and the adoption of brushes allowed greater control over the rock. While a sound strategy, this made for an unexciting game. Observers at the time noted that if two teams equally skilled in the peel game faced each other on good ice, the outcome of the game would be predictable from who won the coin flip to have last rock (or had earned it in the schedule) at the beginning of the game. The Brier was considered by many curling fans as boring to watch because of the near-constant peeling and the quick adoption of the Free Guard Zone the following year reflected how disliked this aspect of the game had become.

One strategy that has been developed by curlers in response to the Free Guard Zone (Kevin Martin from Alberta is one of the best examples) is the "tick" game, where a shot is made attempting to knock (tick) the guard to the side, far enough that it is difficult or impossible to use but still remaining in play while the shot itself goes out of play. The effect is functionally identical to peeling the guard but significantly harder, as a shot that hits the guard too hard (knocking it out of play) results in its being replaced, while not hitting it hard enough can result in its still being tactically useful for the opposition. There&#;s also a greater chance that the shot will miss the guard entirely because of the greater accuracy required to make the shot. Because of the difficulty of making this type of shot, only the best teams will normally attempt it, and it does not dominate the game the way the peel formerly did. Steve Gould from Manitoba popularized ticks played across the face. These are easier to make because they impart less speed on the object stone, therefore increasing the chance that it remains in play even if a bigger chunk of it is hit.

Hammer

Last-rock or last-stone advantage in an end is called the hammer. Before the game, teams typically decide who gets the hammer in the first end either by chance (such as a coin toss), by a "draw-to-the-button" contest, where a representative of each team shoots a single stone to see who gets closer to the centre of the rings, or, particularly in tournament settings like the Winter Olympics, by a comparison of each team&#;s win-loss record. In all subsequent ends, the hammer belongs to the team that did not score in the preceding end. In the event that neither team scores, the hammer remains with the same team. Naturally, it is easier to score points with the hammer than without; in tournament play, the team with the hammer generally tries to score two or more points. If only one point is possible, the skip will often try to avoid scoring at all in order to retain the hammer until the next end, when two or more points may lie. This is called a blank end. Scoring without the hammer is commonly referred to as stealing, or a steal, and is much more difficult.

Strategy

Curling is a game of strategy, tactics and skill. The strategy depends on the team&#;s skill, the opponent&#;s skill, the conditions of the ice, the score of the game, how many ends remain and whether the team has last-stone advantage (the hammer). A team may play an end aggressively or defensively. Aggressive playing will put a lot of stones in play by throwing mostly draws; this makes for an exciting game and is very risky but the reward can be very great. Defensive playing will throw a lot of hits preventing a lot of stones in play; this tends to be less exciting and less risky. A good drawing team will usually opt to play aggressively, while a good hitting team will opt to play defensively.

Diagram of the play area in curling, showing the four-foot zone, corner guard, and centre line guard

If a team does not have the hammer in an end, it will opt to try to clog up the four-foot zone in the house to deny the opposing team access to the button. This can be done by throwing "centre line" guards in front of the house on the centre line, which can be tapped into the house later or drawn around. If a team has the hammer, they will try to keep this four-foot zone free so that they have access to the button area at all times. A team with the hammer may throw a corner guard as their first stone of an end placed in front of the house but outside the four-foot zone to utilize the free guard zone. Corner guards are key for a team to score two points in an end, because they can either draw around it later or hit and roll behind it, making the opposing team&#;s shot to remove it more difficult.

Ideally, the strategy in an end for a team with the hammer is to score two points or more. Scoring one point is often a wasted opportunity, as they will then lose last-rock advantage for the next end. If a team cannot score two points, they will often attempt to "blank an end" by removing any leftover opposition rocks and rolling out; or, if there are no opposition rocks, just throwing the rock through the house so that no team scores any points, and the team with the hammer can try again the next end to score two or more with it. Generally, a team without the hammer would want to either force the team with the hammer to only one point (so that they can get the hammer back) or "steal" the end by scoring one or more points of their own.

Generally, the larger the lead a team will have in a game, the more defensively they should play. By hitting all of the opponent&#;s stones, it removes opportunities for their getting multiple points, therefore defending the lead. If the leading team is quite comfortable, leaving their own stones in play can also be dangerous. Guards can be drawn around by the other team, and stones in the house can be tapped back (if they are in front of the tee line) or frozen onto (if they are behind the tee line). A frozen stone is difficult to remove, because it is "frozen" (in front of and touching) to the opponents stone. At this point, a team will opt for "peels", meaning that the stones they throw will be to not only hit their opposition stones, but to roll out of play as well. Peels are hits that are thrown with the most amount of power.

Conceding a game

It is not uncommon at any level for a losing team to terminate the match before all ends are completed if it believes it no longer has a realistic chance of winning. Playoff games at national and world championships require eight ends to be completed before allowing a losing team to concede in this manner. Competitive games will usually end once the losing team has "run out of rocks"—that is, once it has fewer stones in play and/or available for play than the number of points needed to tie the game in the final end.

When a team feels it is impossible or near impossible to win a game, they will usually shake hands with the opposing team to concede defeat. This may occur at any point during the game, but usually happens near the final end. In the Winter Olympics, a team may concede after completing six ends of a round-robin game, but can only concede after finishing eight ends during the knockout stages.

Measuring which stone is closest to the centre of the house

Unlike other sports, there is no negative connotation associated with conceding in curling. In fact, in many competitions, a team is required to concede when it is mathematically impossible for them to tie a game. In more social situations, it is often considered a breach of etiquette (or at least looked down upon) to keep playing when the game is well out of reach. Some skips will even concede before throwing their final rock if they feel that a positive outcome will be entirely based on luck as opposed to skill.

Dispute resolution

Most decisions about rules are left to the skips, although in official tournaments, decisions may be left to the officials. However, all scoring disputes are handled by the vice skip. No players other than the vice skip from each team should be in the house while score is being determined. In tournament play, the most frequent circumstance in which a decision has to be made by someone other than the vice skip is the failure of the vice skips to agree on which stone is closest to the button. An independent official (supervisor at Canadian and World championships) then measures the distances using a specially designed device that pivots at the centre of the button. When no independent officials are available, the vice skips measure the distances.

Scoring

A typical curling scoreboard used at clubs, which use a method of scoring different from the ones used on television

The winner is the team having the highest number of accumulated points at the completion of ten ends. Points are scored at the conclusion of each of these ends as follows: when each team has thrown its eight stones, the team with the stone closest to the button wins that end; the winning team is then awarded one point for each of its own stones lying closer to the button than the opponent&#;s closest stone.

Only stones that are in the house are considered in the scoring. A stone is in the house if it lies within the foot ( m) zone or any portion of its edge lies over the edge of the ring. Since the bottom of the stone is rounded, a stone just barely in the house will not have any actual contact with the ring, which will pass under the rounded edge of the stone, but it still counts. This type of stone is known as a biter.

It may not be obvious to the eye which of two rocks is closer to the button (center) or if a rock is actually biting or not. There are specialized devices to make these determinations, but these cannot be brought out until after an end is completed. Therefore, a team may make strategic decisions during an end based on assumptions of rock position that turn out to be incorrect.

The score is marked on a scoreboard, of which there are two types; the baseball type and the club scoreboard.

The baseball-type scoreboard was created for televised games for audiences not familiar with the club scoreboard. The ends are marked by columns 1 through 10 (or 11 for the possibility of an extra end to break ties) plus an additional column for the total. Below this are two rows, one for each team, containing the team&#;s score for that end and their total score in the right hand column.

The club scoreboard is traditional and used in most curling clubs. Scoring on this board only requires the use of (up to) 11 digit cards, whereas with baseball-type scoring an unknown number of multiples of the digits (especially low digits like 1) may be needed. The numbered centre row represents all possible accumulated scores, and the numbers placed in the team rows represent the end in which that team achieved that cumulative score. If the red team scores three points in the first end (called a three-ender), then a 1 (indicating the first end) is placed beside the number 3 in the red row. If they score two more in the second end, then a 2 will be placed beside the 5 in the red row, indicating that the red team has five points in total (3+2). This scoreboard works because only one team can get points in an end. However, some confusion may arise if neither team scores points in an end, this is called a blank end. The blank end numbers are usually listed in the farthest column on the right in the row of the team that has the hammer (last rock advantage), or on a special spot for blank ends.

The following example illustrates the difference between the two types. The example illustrates the men&#;s final at the Winter Olympics.

Team12345678910Final
 Canada02110600xx10
 Finland20001001xx4
 Canada 234     6      
Points123456789101112131415Blank ends
 Finland 158           7

Eight points – all the rocks thrown by one team counting – is the highest score possible in an end, and is known as an "eight-ender" or "snowman". Scoring an eight-ender against a relatively competent team is very difficult; in curling, it is considered the equivalent of pitching a perfect game in baseball. Probably the best-known snowman came at the Players&#; Championships. Future () World Champion Kelly Scott scored eight points in one of her games against World bronze medalist Cathy King.


Text & images taken from Wikipedia 05/29/

Text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., a non-profit organization.

Источник: [casinoextra.fr]

Scoreboards

Anyone who has seen curling in a big arena or in the Olympics probably has seen the score displayed much like a baseball score. The scoreboard has a row at the top of the board showing the end played (like an inning), and two rows below that showing each team's score.

Most curling clubs use a traditional curling scoreboard - which can be confusing because it looks somewhat like a baseball scoreboard. But for curling, the movable numbers represent the ends - and therefore there are only 10 or 11 of them. The fixed numbers - green in this illustration - along the center show the score. At the end of each end, the vice-skip (usually) of the scoring team posts the end number next to the score they have now achieved. In this picture, Yellow scored 1 point in the first end, so they posted "1" along the yellow line over the green score of "1.' In the second end, Red scored 3 points, so they posted the "2" along the red line under the green score of "3."

The furthest end number to the right represents the score on the center scale. In this case, Yellow won 8 to 6. So end by end:

  1. Yellow scored 1, score now yellow
  2. Red scored 3, score now red
  3. Yellow scored 3, score now yellow
  4. Red scored 1, score now
  5. Yellow scored 1, score now yellow
  6. Red scored 1, score now
  7. Yellow scored 1, score now yellow
  8. Yellow stole 2, score now yellow
  9. Red scored 1, final score yellow

We call it a steal when a team scores in spite of not throwing the last rock (having the hammer). The H next to yellow indicates they had hammer in the first end.

If an end is blanked (no score), the number for that end is hung to the side of the scoreboard so you can see the end has been played.

Источник: [casinoextra.fr]

The winner is the "team" having the highest number of accumulated points at the completion of 10 "ends".

If at the end of the game the "score" is tied, "extra ends" are played until a winner is decided.

Points are scored at the conclusion of each of these "ends" as follows: when each "team" has thrown its eight "stones", the "team" with the "stone" closest to the "tee" wins that "end"; the winning "team" is then awarded one point for each of its own "stones" lying closer to the "tee" than the opponent's closest "stone".

Only "stones" that are in the "house" are considered in the scoring. A "stone" is in the "house" if it lies within the "twelve foot" ( m) zone or any portion of its edge lies over the edge of the ring. Since the bottom of the stone is rounded, a "stone" just barely in the "house" will not have any actual contact with the ring, which will pass under the rounded edge of the "stone", but it still counts; this type of "stone" is known as a "biter".

If at the end of an "end" no "stone" is in the "house" no team scores in this "end"; this situation is called "blank end".

It may not be obvious to the eye which of two "stones" is closer to the "tee" or if a "stone" is actually biting or not; there are specialized devices to make these determinations, but these cannot be brought out until after an "end" is completed. Therefore, a "team" may make strategic decisions during an "end" based on assumptions of stone position that turn out to be incorrect.

The score is marked on a "scoreboard".

Источник: [casinoextra.fr]

Understanding the Scoreboards in Curling

As you would see in televised or professional curling, the scoreboards are easy to read and understand. They look something like this:

Ice 1

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

TOTAL

 

4

0

2

0

0

1

2

0

0

X

9

 

0

0

0

1

1

0

0

2

1

X

 

5

 

   The hammer represents the team with the last rock  through an end.

The bold numbers in the first row are the ends.

In end 1, blue scored 4, therefore red received 0 points. There were no rocks in the house in end 2, so it was a blank end and no one scored. Blue scored another 2 points in end 3. The points went along as so but after end 9, red forfeited the game and two X’s were put on the board to indicate that the end was not played. Blue won with a total of 9&#;5 over red.

 

 

As you may have noticed, not all scoreboards are as above. Most curling clubs use a different, slightly more complicated, method of scoring. Before the game, here’s what these scoreboards look like:

 

Ice 1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The blue and red are the curling club’s rock colours. The numbers on the board are the amount of points each team has. There is also a small box beside the board containing the numbers 1 through 1 through 10 for the usual ends, and the 11 for that extra end you sometimes need.

 

 

End 1:

Ice 1

 

 

 

 

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

After the first end, blue scored 4 points. The number 1 from the little box (representing the first end) is put above the number 4 because of the amount of points made. It is on the blue row because blue scored.

 

End 2:

Ice 1

 

 

 

 

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2

 

This end was blank because no points were made. The marker for the second end usually goes at the end of the board to show that it was blank. Some teams like to flip the marker over not to confuse the spectators.

 

End 3:

Ice 1

 

 

 

 

1

 

3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2

 

End 3, blue scored another two points. When you add 2 points to the previous score, the blue team is now at 6. (4+2) The marker is then placed over the six because that is how many points they have in total after three ends. The current score is for the blue team because there are no end markers on the red row.

 

End 4:

Ice 1

 

 

 

 

1

 

3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

 

4

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2

 

Red finally scored a point! You add this end to the previous score (if there is any), for a total of 1 (0+1). The current score is now , again in favour of blue.

 

End 5:

Ice 1

 

 

 

 

1

 

3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

 

4

5

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2

 

Red stole* (took points without last rock advantage) another point. They are now at 2 points in total (1+1) so the 5th end marker is placed underneath the 2.

 

End 6:

Ice 1

 

 

 

 

1

 

3

6

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

 

4

5

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2

 

In this end, team blue scored another point, which is added to their previous score of six (4+2+1). The marker is placed above the 7 because that is how many points blue has after 6 ends. The score after these 6 ends is now for blue.

 

End 7:

Ice 1

 

 

 

 

1

 

3

6

 

7

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

 

4

5

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2

 

Blue is still leading the way. They stole 2 more points. They are now at 9 points (4+2+1+2) as you can see above. The 7th marker is placed above the 9. The scoreboard now shows in favour of blue.

 

End 8:

Ice 1

 

 

 

 

1

 

3

6

 

7

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

 

4

5

 

8

 

Источник: [casinoextra.fr]

Scores

LIVE SPORTS, SPORTSCENTRE AND MORE – STREAM ON TSN DIRECT!

TSN
    • NHL
      • Flames rise high, Habs rock bottom in NHL Power Ranking
      • Forsberg, Predators stay hot with victory over Kings
      • Marchessault scores twice, Golden Knights beat Rangers
      • NHL: Rangers 1, Golden Knights 5
      • NHL: Blue Jackets 1, Devils 3
      • NHL: Panthers 5, Stars 6 (SO)
      • NHL: Penguins 6, Flyers 2
      • Landeskog hat trick, five points from MacKinnon help Avs rout Jets
      • NHL: Flames 1, Lightning 4
      • Larsson's 1st hat trick powers Coyotes past Blackhawks
      • What led to Winnipeg's second period let down?
      • Benn, Stars exit COVID protocols with win over Panthers
      • Boldy nets 1st NHL goal as Wild edge Bruins; Kaprizov exits with injury
      • Kucherov has two assists in return; Lightning beat Flames
      • Devils beat Blue Jackets for 4th win in 5 games
      • Penguins beat Flyers for 10th straight victory
      • Sharks end two-game skid with win over Sabres
    • CFL
      • Bombers reach extension with DL Jefferson, nearing deal with DE Jeffcoat
      • Mace officially named new Argos defensive co-ordinator
      • Calvillo joins Alouettes staff as QB coach
      • Blue Bombers sign OT Hardrick to contract extension
      • 3 Downs: Elks and Stamps ink QBs, Calvillo returns to Alouettes
      • Reinebold heads to Montreal as special team coach
      • Elks re-work QB Arbuckle's contract
      • Blue Bombers sign receiver Blake Jackson
      • Calvillo joins Alouettes staff as QB coach
      • Stamps, Begelton agree to terms on one-year deal
      • Stampeders re-sign defensive lineman Orimolade
      • Thomas to return for 10th season with Blue Bombers
      • Stampeders add QB Stevens
      • Elks sign three Canadians, including veteran lineman Foucault
      • Stampeders extend OL Good-Jones through
      • Blue Bombers, Canadian DB Hallett agree to one-year extension
      • Tiger-Cats to announce new ownership structure
      • Tiger-Cats announce new ownership structure
      • Reinebold leaving Ticats after seven seasons with club
      • Stampeders sign QB Maier to contract extension
    • NFL
      • Packers OC Hackett to interview with Jaguars
      • NFL Spotlight: Bucs cut Antonio Brown
      • Schefter on AB saga: 'Both sides again make their own claims about what unfolded'
      • Bucs release Antonio Brown, say he was cleared to play
      • Top NFL plays of the season
      • Ex-NFL RB Portis sentenced to six months for fraud scheme
      • LSU cornerback Stingley Jr. to enter NFL draft
      • Arians claims Brown was upset about targets
      • What took the Bucs so long to release Antonio Brown
      • Orlovsky: Colts the team 'best-built' to beat the Chiefs
      • Orlovsky blasts MVP voter who said he wouldn't vote for Rodgers
      • Bears put QB Fields on reserve/COVID list
      • Buccaneers respond to Brown's allegations, terminate contract
      • Irvin shares whether he trusts Herbert or Carr more with the season on the line
      • Steelers place WR Johnson, C Green on Reserve-COVID list
      • Woody: Antonio Brown's statement is 'eye-opening'
      • Carr, Raiders preparing for potential all-or-nothing showdown with rival Chargers
      • Antonio Brown explains his side of the story, says he was cut before leaving field
      • Brown says he was forced to play on injured ankle
    • NBA
      • DeRozan: We're all playing with a chip on our shoulder
      • Must See: 6-foot-3 Gary Payton II wins jump ball over 7-footer Jonas Valanciunas
      • NBA: Clippers 89, Suns
      • Udoka rips Celtics' 'lack of mental toughness' after blowing lead
      • Randle says thumbs-down gesture meant hush boos at MSG
      • Paul has triple-double, NBA-leading Suns top Clippers
      • NBA: Celtics , Knicks
      • Non-boosted NBAers to be tested daily through All-Star break
      • Ingram scores 32, Pelicans beat depleted Warriors
      • NBA: Warriors 96, Pelicans
      • Report: Kawhi ahead of schedule in ACL rehab
      • NBA: Pistons 88, Grizzlies
      • Morant, Grizzlies rout lowly Pistons for 7th straight win
      • Barrett banks in winner as Knicks complete comeback against Celtics
      • Must See: RJ Barrett banks in desperation 3 at the buzzer as Knicks stun Celtics
      • NBA fines Kings $50,, AGM Wilcox $15,
      • Jazz's Gobert, Bucks' Holiday enter NBA's health and safety protocols
      • Wizards announcer Consor apologizes to Porter for comment
      • Perkins' top-5 international NBA players
      • Warriors' Curry (quad), Green (hip) miss game against Pelicans
    • Golf
      • PGA: Sentry Tournament of Champions - Rd. 1
      • Cantlay, Rahm don't miss beat with good starts at Kapalu
      • Stricker details battle with mysterious illness after captaining U.S. at Ryder Cup
      • Tiger's return among questions for golf's new year
      • Hovland reunited with clubs ahead of Sentry Tournament of Champions
      • Speed Golf: Who will be No. 1 in the world a year from now?
      • Kapalua means time for Rahm and Cantlay to get back to work
      • Champ withdraws from PGA Tour's Sentry Tournament of Champions
      • Bob Weeks Picks Six: Sentry Tournament of Champions
      • Canadian Golf Rankings - January 3,
      • PGA TOUR Canada announces Qualifying Tournament schedule
      • Golf offered up plenty of memorable and forgettable moments in
      • Players to get Saudi release with pledge to return to Pebble
      • Tiger, son sink 11 straight birdies, but Daly duo win PNC Championship
      • Final golf ranking of brings Masters field to 83, includes Canadian Hughes
      • Woods returns with three shots that look like the Tiger of old
      • Woods returns to golf, still 'long way' from the real thing
      • Woods has 'an awesome day' with son in return to golf at PNC Championship pro-am
      • Woods said to be 'crazy good' as he prepares for golf return
      • Spieth and caddie looking for an edge in reading putts
    • Soccer
      • TFC’s Laryea to join English Championship club Nottingham Forest
      • CanMNT cancels Florida training camp
      • Canada's Priestman not on list of final nominees for FIFA coaching award
      • Manchester City dealing with COVID outbreak; Four Serie A games postponed
      • TFC’s Laryea to join English Championship club Nottingham Forest
      • Turkish Super Cup: Besiktas 1, Antalyaspor 1 ( PK)
      • Davies tests positive for COVID; David doing well after testing positive
      • Chelsea gifted goals by Spurs to gain cup semifinal lead
      • Canada's Atiba Hutchinson named man of the match in Besiktas' Turkish Super Cup win
      • Barcelona rallies to beat third-tier team in Copa opener
      • US women to face Iceland, New Zealand and Czech Republic
      • St. Louis MLS expansion team hires Carnell as coach
      • Bradley brings experience, enthusiasm and hope to Toronto FC
      • Canada's Labbe one of three finalists for FIFA goalkeeping award
      • Canada's Davies tests positive for COVID
      • Kawabe joins Wolverhampton from Grasshoppers
      • Liverpool closes training centre as COVID cases rise
      • Report: Insigne to join Toronto FC in blockbuster MLS deal
      • Southampton bought by firm fronted by Serbian media giant
    • Curling
      • Curling on TSN Broadcast Schedule
      • Waiting Game: After cancellation of mixed doubles trials, curlers waiting on decision
      • Ontario Scotties suspended due to provincial restrictions
      • Tournament of Hearts and Brier Playdowns
      • Which Canadian mixed doubles team should be selected for Beijing?
      • Curling Roster Tracker
      • Canada's Olympic mixed doubles curling trials cancelled due to COVID
      • Former Bottcher vice Moulding to join Team Grattan
      • Kennedy joins Gushue's curling team as Olympic alternate
      • Epping outlasts Koe in Banff, Walker wins in Avonair as playdowns near
      • Kennedy will join Team Gushue at Beijing Olympics as an alternate
      • Zacharias captures Manitoba Scotties title, Homan qualifies for Ontario playdowns
      • Curling Canada finalizes team field for mixed-doubles trials
      • St-Georges/Asselin, Carey/Hodgson qualify for Mixed Doubles Trials
      • Sex toy ads removed from ice at Olympic curling qualifier
      • Moulding not planning to make decision on curling future until New Year
      • Americans Plys, Persinger make Olympic mixed doubles field
      • Continental Cup cancelled due to 'travel restrictions, isolation requirements'
      • Einarson, Jacobs team up for Canadian mixed doubles trials
    • NCAA
      • Bama extends Saban through
      • Duke coach-in-waiting Scheyer: Goal is to 'win the whole damn thing' for Krzyzewski
      • Manziel says he made 'decent living' selling autographs at Texas A&M
      • Duke coach Krzyzewski to retire after season
      • Who is Jon Scheyer? Meeting the Duke basketball assistant who will be Coach K's successor
      • Bush, Luck, Lynch among nominees for College Football Hall of Fame
      • UCLA's Riley enters NBA draft, not hiring agent
      • Canada's Amanda wins MAC Hermann Trophy
      • Robert Morris cuts men's and women's hockey
      • Metchie wins Cornish Trophy as outstanding Canadian in NCAA football
      • Former LSU starting quarterback Finley transferring to Auburn
      • Former MSU player Appling arrested in connection to fatal shooting
      • UConn extends Auriemma through
      • Santa Clara wins College Cup on penalties over Florida State
      • Marshall wins first-ever College Cup with OT win over Indiana
      • Former Hawaii standout Brennan dead at 37
      • Jordan game-worn North Carolina jersey sells for $ million
      • Texas linebacker Ehlinger found dead
      • Hubbard, Metchie among Cornish finalists
      • Three Canadian soccer players among 15 semifinalists for MAC Hermann Trophy
    • Tennis
      • Auger-Aliassime stuns Zverev in first-ever top five win, Canada reaches ATP Cup semis
      • Djokovic to remain in visa limbo until Monday as he fights deportation from Australia
      • Daily Australian Open coverage on TSN
      • Australian PM on Djokovic: Rules are rules
      • Nadal on Djokovic: 'If he wanted, he would be playing here in Australia without a problem'
      • Djokovic's mother: They are keeping him prisoner
      • Canada advances to ATP Cup semifinals
      • Nadal wins opening match; Osaka also advances
      • Djokovic in limbo as he fights deportation from Australia
      • Wertheim on Djokovic: 'It's just another instance of self-sabotage'
      • Fifth-seeded Swiatek defeats Fernandez in Adelaide
      • PTI's Wilbon and Kornheiser applaud Australia for denying Djokovic entry
      • Australia cancels visa of world No.1 Djokovic, asks him to leave country
      • Barty opens her season with win over Gauff in Adelaide
      • Spain beats Serbia, joins Poland in ATP Cup semifinals
      • Djokovic has visa cancelled; told to leave Australia
      • Osaka opens season with win over Cornet
      • Shapovalov, Auger-Aliassime lead Canada past Great Britain at ATP Cup
      • Djokovic receives medical exemption to play at Australian Open
Источник: [casinoextra.fr]
curling club scoreboard

GAMEPLAY

The purpose of the game is to score points by getting stones closer to the house center, or the "button", than the other team&#;s stones. Players from either team alternate in taking shots from the far side of the sheet. An end is complete when all curling club scoreboard rocks from each team have been delivered, a total of sixteen stones. If the teams are tied at the end of the game, play continues for as many ends as may be required to break the tie. The winner is the team with the highest score after all ends have been completed (see Scoring below). A game may be conceded if considered unwinnable.

International competitive games are ten ends, so most of the national championships that send a representative to the World Championships or Olympics also play ten ends. However, there is a movement on the World Curling Tour to make the games only eight ends. Most tournaments on that tour are eight ends, as are the vast majority of recreational games.

At the Winter Olympic Games a curler from Team Canada delivers a stone, while his teammates look on, ready to begin sweeping. The curler uses his broom to help keep his balance during delivery.

In international competition, each side is given 73 minutes to complete all of its throws. Each team is also allowed two second timeouts per end curling club scoreboard. If extra ends are required, each team is allowed 10 minutes of playing time to complete its throws and one added second timeout for each extra end.

Delivery

The process of sliding a stone down the sheet is known as the delivery.

The skip, or the captain of the team, curling club scoreboard, will usually determine the required weight, turn, and line of the stone. These will be influenced by the tactics at this point in the game, which may involve taking-out, curling club scoreboard, blocking or tapping another stone.

  • The weight of the stone is its velocity, which depends on the leg drive of the delivery rather than the arm.
  • The turn, handle, or curl is the rotation of the stone, which gives it a curling club scoreboard trajectory.
  • The line is the direction of the throw ignoring the effect of the turn.

The skip may communicate the weight, turn, line, and other tactics by calling or tapping a broom acklam green centre football the ice. In the case of a takeout, guard, or a tap, the skip will indicate the stones involved.

Before delivery, the running surface of the stone is wiped clean and the path across the ice swept with the broom if necessary, because any dirt on the bottom of a stone or in its path can alter the trajectory and ruin the shot, curling club scoreboard. Intrusion by a foreign object is called a pick up or pick.

Players must push out of the hack to deliver their stones.

The thrower throws from the hack, curling club scoreboard. Another player, usually the skip, is stationed behind the button to determine the tactics, weight, turn, and line, and the other two may sweep in front of the stone to influence the trajectory (see Sweeping, below). The players, with the exception of the skip, take turns throwing and sweeping; when one player (e.g., the lead) throws, the players not throwing (the second and third) sweep, curling club scoreboard. When the skip throws, the third, or vice-skip, takes his role.

The thrower&#;s gripper shoe (with the non-slippery sole) is positioned against one of the hacks; for a right-handed curler the right foot is placed against the left hack and vice-versa for a left-hander. The thrower, now in the hack, lines the body up with shoulders square to the skip&#;s broom at the far end for line.

The stone is placed in front of the foot now in the hack. Rising slightly from the hack, the thrower pulls the stone back to the toe (some older curlers may actually raise the stone in this backward movement) then lunges smoothly curling club scoreboard from the hack pushing the stone ahead while the slider striped gaucho jumpsuit is moved in front of the gripper foot, which trails behind. The thrust from this lunge determines the weight and hence the distance the stone will travel. While not compulsory, most curlers deliver the stone while sliding out from the hack. Balance may be assisted by a broom held in the free hand with the back of the broom down so that it slides.

The stone is released as the thrower&#;s curling club scoreboard wanes, or the hog line is approached, at which point the turn is imparted by a slight clockwise or anti-clockwise twist of the handle from around the two or ten o&#;clock position to the twelve o&#;clock on release. A typical rate of turn is about 2½ rotations before coming to a rest.

The stone must be released before its front edge crosses the near hog line, and it must clear the far hog line or else be removed from play (hogged); an exception is made if a stone fails to come to rest beyond the far hog line after rebounding from a stone in play just past the hog line. The release rule is rarely enforced in club play unless abuse is suspected. However, in major tournaments it is strictly enforced; the "eye on the hog" sensor in the stone will indicate whether the stone has been legally thrown or not. The lights on the stone handle will either light up green, indicating that the stone has been legally thrown, or red, in which case the illegally thrown stone will be immediately pulled from play instead of waiting for the stone to come to rest.

Sweeping

The skip of Team Sweden joins the front end curling club scoreboard sweeping a stone into the house at the Winter Olympic Games in Vancouver

After the stone is delivered, its trajectory curling club scoreboard still influenced by the two sweepers under instruction from the skip. Sweeping is done for two reasons: to reduce friction underneath the stone, and to decrease the amount of curl. The stones curl more as they slow down, so sweeping early in travel tends to increase distance as well as straighten the path, and sweeping after sideways motion is established can increase the sideways distance. When sweeping, pressure and speed of the brush head are key in slightly increasing the layer of moisture that builds up under the stone.

One of the basic strategy aspects of curling is knowing when to sweep. When the ice in front of the stone is swept, a stone will usually travel both farther and straighter. In some situations, one of the two alterations in path is not desirable. For example, a stone may have too much weight, but require sweeping to prevent curling into a guard. The team must decide which is better: getting by the guard but traveling too far, or hitting the guard.

Much of the yelling that goes on during a curling game is the skip calling the line of the shot and the sweepers calling the weight. The skip evaluates the path of the stone and calls to the sweepers to sweep as necessary to maintain the intended track. The sweepers themselves are responsible for judging the weight of the stone, ensuring the length of travel is correct and communicating the weight of the stone back to the skip. Some teams use stopwatch timing, curling club scoreboard, from back line to the nearest hog line as a sweeping aid. Many teams use the Number System to communicate in which of 10 playable zones it is estimated the stone will stop.

Usually, the two sweepers will be on opposite sides of the stone&#;s path, although depending on which side the sweepers&#; strengths lie curling club scoreboard may not always be the case. Speed and pressure are vital to sweeping. In gripping the broom, curling club scoreboard, one hand should be one third of the way from the top (non-brush end) of the handle while the other hand should be one third of the way curling club scoreboard the head of the broom. The angle of the broom to the ice should be so that the most force possible can be exerted on the ice. The precise amount of pressure may vary from relatively light brushing ("just cleaning" - to ensure debris will not alter the stone&#;s path) to maximum-pressure scrubbing.

Sweeping is allowed anywhere on the ice up to the tee line, as long as it is only for one&#;s curling club scoreboard team stones. Once the leading edge of a team stone crosses the tee line only one player may sweep it. Additionally, when a stone crosses the tee line, one player from the other team is allowed to sweep it. This is the only case that a stone may be swept by an opposing team member. In international rules, this player must be the skip; or if the skip is throwing, then the sweeping player must be the third.

Burning a stone

Occasionally, players may accidentally touch a stone with their broom or a body part. This is often referred to as burning a stone. Players touching a stone in such a manner are expected to call their own infraction as a matter of good sportsmanship. Touching a stationary stone when no stones are in motion (there is no delivery in progress) is not an infraction (unless the stationary stone is struck in such a manner that its position is altered), and is a common way for the skip to indicate a stone that is to be taken out.

When a stone is touched when stones are in play, the remedies vary between placing the stones as they end up after the touch, replacing the stones as they would have been if no stone were touched, or removal of the touched stone from play, curling club scoreboard. In non-officiated league play, the skip of the non-offending team has the final say on where the stones are placed after the infraction.

Types of shots

Two ways to get the end with the last stone, playing a draw

Many different types of shots are used to carefully place stones for strategic or tactical reasons; they fall into three fundamental categories as follows:

Guards are thrown east texas gymnastics tyler tx front of the house in the free guard zone, usually to protect the shot-rock (the stone closest to the button at the time) or to make the opposing team&#;s shot difficult. Guard shots include the centre-guard, on the centreline and the corner-guards to the left or right sides of the centre line. See Free Guard Zone below.

Draws are thrown only to reach curling club scoreboard house. Draw shots include raise and angle-raise, curling club scoreboard, come-around, and freeze shots.

Takeouts are intended to remove stones from play and include the peel, curling club scoreboard, hit-and-roll and double shots.

Free guard zone

Until four stones have been played (two from each side), stones in the free guard zone (those stones left in the area between the hog and tee lines, excluding the house) may not be removed by an opponent&#;s stone (although they can be moved as long as they are not taken out of play). These are known as guard rocks. If the guard rocks are removed, they are replaced to where they were before the shot was thrown, and the opponent&#;s stone is removed from play and cannot be replayed, curling club scoreboard. This rule is known as the four-rock rule or the free guard zone rule (for a while in Canada, a "three-rock rule" was in place, but that rule has been replaced by the four-rock rule).

Originally, the Modified Moncton Rule was developed from a suggestion made by Russ Howard for the Moncton cashspiel (with the richest prize ever awarded at the time in a tournament) in Moncton, New Brunswick, in January "Howard&#;s Rule" (also known as the Moncton Rule), used for the tournament and based on a practice drill his team used, had the first four rocks in play unable to be removed no matter where they were at any time during the end. This method of play altered slightly and adopted as a Four-rock Free Guard Zone for international competition shortly after. Canada kept to the traditional rules until a three-rock Free Guard Zone rule was adopted, starting in the season, curling club scoreboard. After several years of having the three-rock rule used for the Canadian championships and the winners then having to adjust to the four-rock rule in the World Championships, the Canadian Curling Association adopted the now-standard Free Guard Zone in the season.

This rule, a relatively recent addition to curling, was added in response to a strategy of "peeling" opponents&#; guard stones (knocking them out of play at an angle that caused the shooter&#;s stone to also roll out of play, leaving no stones on the ice). A team in the lead would often employ this strategy during the game, curling club scoreboard. By knocking all curling club scoreboard out, the opponents could at best score one point (if they had the hammer). Alternatively, curling club scoreboard, the team with the hammer could peel rock after rock, which would blank the end, keeping the last rock advantage for another end. This strategy had developed (mostly in Canada) as ice-makers had become skilled at creating a predictable ice surface and the adoption of brushes allowed greater control over the rock. While a sound strategy, this made for an unexciting game. Observers at the time noted that if two teams equally skilled in the peel game faced each other on good ice, the outcome of the game would be predictable from who won the coin flip to have last rock (or had earned it in the schedule) at the beginning of the game. The Brier was considered by many curling fans as boring to watch because of the near-constant peeling and the quick adoption of the Free Guard Zone the following year reflected how disliked this aspect of the game had become.

One strategy that has been developed by curlers in response to the Free Guard Zone (Kevin Martin from Alberta is one of the best examples) is the "tick" game, where a shot is made attempting to knock (tick) the guard to the side, far enough that it is difficult or impossible to use but still remaining in play while the shot itself goes out of play. The effect is functionally identical to peeling the guard but significantly harder, as a shot that hits the guard too hard (knocking it out of play) results in its being replaced, curling club scoreboard, while not hitting it hard enough can result in its still being tactically useful for the opposition. There&#;s also a greater chance that the shot will miss the guard entirely because of the greater accuracy required to make the shot. Because of the difficulty of making this type of shot, only the best teams will normally attempt it, and it does not dominate the game the way the peel formerly did, curling club scoreboard. Steve Gould from Manitoba popularized ticks played across the face. These are easier to make because they impart less speed on the object stone, therefore increasing the chance that it remains in play even if a bigger chunk of it is hit.

Hammer

Last-rock or last-stone advantage in an end is called the hammer. Before the game, teams typically decide who gets the hammer in curling club scoreboard first end either by chance (such as a coin toss), by a "draw-to-the-button" contest, where a representative of each team shoots a single stone to see who gets closer to the centre of the rings, or, particularly in tournament settings like the Winter Olympics, by a comparison of each team&#;s win-loss record. In all subsequent ends, the hammer belongs to the team that did not score in the preceding end. In the event that neither team scores, the hammer remains with the same team, curling club scoreboard. Naturally, it is easier to score points with the hammer than without; in tournament play, the team with the hammer generally tries to score two or more points. If only one point is possible, the skip will often try to avoid scoring at all in order to retain the hammer until the next end, when two or more points may lie. This is called a blank end. Scoring without the hammer is commonly referred to as stealing, or a steal, and is much more difficult.

Strategy

Curling is a game of strategy, tactics and skill. The strategy depends on the team&#;s skill, the opponent&#;s skill, the conditions of the ice, the score of the game, how many ends remain and whether the team has last-stone advantage (the hammer). A team may play an end aggressively or defensively. Aggressive playing will put a lot of stones in play by throwing mostly draws; this makes for an exciting game and is very risky but the reward can be very great. Defensive playing will throw a lot of hits preventing a lot of stones in play; this tends to be less exciting and less risky. A good drawing team will usually opt to play aggressively, while a good hitting team will opt to play defensively.

Diagram of the play area in curling, showing the four-foot zone, corner guard, and centre line guard

If a team does not have the hammer in an end, it will opt to try to clog up the four-foot zone in the house to deny the opposing team access to the button. This can be done by throwing "centre line" guards in front of the house on the centre line, curling club scoreboard, which can be tapped into the house later or drawn around. If a team has the hammer, they will try to keep this four-foot zone free so that they have access to the button area at all times. A team with the hammer may throw a corner guard as their first stone of an end placed in front of the house but outside the four-foot zone to utilize the free guard zone. Corner guards are key for a team to score two points in an end, because they curling club scoreboard either draw around it later or hit and roll behind it, making the opposing team&#;s shot to remove it more difficult.

Ideally, the strategy in an end for a team with the hammer is to score two points or more. Scoring one point is often a wasted opportunity, as they will then lose last-rock advantage for the next end. If a team cannot score two points, they will often attempt to "blank curling club scoreboard end" by removing any leftover opposition rocks and rolling out; or, if there are no opposition rocks, just throwing the rock through the house so that no team scores any points, curling club scoreboard, and the team with the hammer can try again the next end to score two or more with it. Generally, a team without the hammer would want to either force the team with the hammer to only one point (so that they can get the hammer back) or "steal" the end by scoring one or more points of their own.

Generally, the larger the lead a team will have in a game, the more defensively they should play. By hitting all of the opponent&#;s stones, it removes opportunities for their getting multiple points, therefore defending the lead. If the leading team is quite comfortable, curling club scoreboard, leaving their own stones in play can also be dangerous. Guards can be drawn around by the other team, and stones in the house can be tapped back (if they are in front of the tee line) or frozen onto (if they are behind the tee line). A frozen stone is difficult to remove, because it is "frozen" (in front of and touching) to the opponents stone. At this point, a team will opt for "peels", meaning that the stones they throw will be to not only hit their opposition stones, curling club scoreboard, but to roll out of play as well, curling club scoreboard. Peels are hits that are thrown with the most amount of power.

Conceding a game

It is not uncommon at any level for a losing team to terminate the match before all ends are curling club scoreboard if it believes it no longer has a realistic chance of winning. Playoff games at national and world championships require eight ends to be completed before allowing a losing team to concede in this manner. Competitive games will usually end once the losing team has "run out of rocks"—that is, once it has fewer stones in play and/or available for play than the number of points curling club scoreboard to tie the game in the final end.

When a team feels it is impossible or near impossible to win a game, they will usually shake hands with the opposing team to concede defeat. This may occur at any point during the game, but usually happens near the final end. In the Winter Olympics, a team may concede after completing six ends of a round-robin game, but can only concede after finishing eight ends during the knockout stages.

Measuring which stone is closest to the centre of the house

Unlike other sports, there is no negative connotation associated with conceding in curling. In fact, curling club scoreboard, in many competitions, a team is required to concede when it is mathematically impossible for them to tie a game. In more social situations, it is often considered a breach of etiquette (or at least looked down upon) to keep playing when the game is well out of reach. Some skips will even concede before throwing their final rock if they feel that a positive outcome will be entirely based on luck as opposed to skill.

Dispute resolution

Most decisions about rules are left to the skips, although in official tournaments, decisions may be left to the officials. However, all scoring disputes are handled by the vice skip. No players other than the vice skip from each team should be in the house while score is being determined. In tournament play, the most frequent circumstance in which a decision has to be made by someone other than the vice skip is the failure of the vice skips to agree on which stone is closest to the button. An independent official (supervisor at Canadian and World championships) then measures the distances using a specially designed device that pivots at the centre of the button. When no independent officials are available, the vice skips measure the distances.

Scoring

A typical curling scoreboard used at clubs, which use a method curling club scoreboard scoring different from the ones used on television

The winner is the team having the highest number of accumulated points at the completion of ten ends. Points are scored at the conclusion of each of these ends as follows: when each team has thrown its eight stones, the team with the stone closest to the button wins that end; the winning team is then awarded one point for each of its own stones lying closer to the button than the opponent&#;s closest stone.

Only stones that are in the house are considered in the scoring. A stone is in the house if it lies within the foot ( m) zone or any portion of its edge lies over the edge of the ring. Since the bottom of the stone is rounded, a stone just barely in the house will not have any actual contact with the ring, which will pass under the rounded edge of the stone, but it still counts. This type of stone is known as a biter.

It may not be obvious to the eye which of two rocks is closer to the button (center) or curling club scoreboard a rock is actually biting or not. There are specialized devices to make these determinations, curling club scoreboard, but these cannot be brought out until after an end is completed. Therefore, a team may make strategic decisions during an end based on assumptions of rock position that turn out to be incorrect.

The score is marked on a scoreboard, of which there are two types; the baseball type and the club scoreboard.

The baseball-type scoreboard was created for televised games for audiences not familiar with the club scoreboard. The ends are marked by columns 1 through 10 (or 11 for the possibility of an extra end to break ties) plus an additional column for the total. Below this are two rows, one for each team, curling club scoreboard, containing the team&#;s score for that end and their total score in the right hand column.

The club scoreboard is traditional and used in most curling clubs. Scoring on this board only requires the use of (up to) 11 digit cards, whereas with baseball-type scoring an unknown number of multiples of the curling club scoreboard (especially low digits like 1) may be needed. The numbered centre row represents all possible accumulated scores, and the numbers placed in the team rows represent the end in which that team achieved that cumulative score. If the red team scores three points in the first end (called a three-ender), then a 1 (indicating the first end) is placed beside the number 3 in the red row. If they score two more in the second end, then a 2 will be placed beside the 5 in the red row, indicating that the red team has five points in total (3+2). This scoreboard works because only one team can get points in an end. However, some confusion may arise if neither team scores points in an end, this is called a blank end. The blank end numbers are usually listed in the farthest column on the right in the row of the team that has the hammer (last rock advantage), or on a special spot for blank ends.

The following example illustrates the difference between the two types. The example illustrates the men&#;s final at the Winter Olympics.

Team12345678910Final
 Canada02110600xx10
 Finland20001001xx4
 Canada 234     6      
Points123456789101112131415Blank ends
 Finland 158           7

Eight points – all the rocks thrown by one team counting – is the highest score possible in an end, and is known as an "eight-ender" or "snowman", curling club scoreboard. Scoring an eight-ender against a relatively competent team is very difficult; in curling, it is considered the equivalent of pitching a perfect game in baseball. Probably the best-known snowman came at the Players&#; Championships. Future () Privacy fence clarksville tn Champion Kelly Scott scored eight points in one of her games against World bronze medalist Cathy King.


Text & images taken from Wikipedia 05/29/

Text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., a non-profit organization.

Источник: [casinoextra.fr]

Welcome! We're glad you have chosen to become a member of the Port Perry Curling Club. We're committed to serving our membership, so please don't hesitate to contact any one of our club Directors with any questions, concerns or compliments, curling club scoreboard. We welcome your suggestions and advice and will make every effort to earn your continued support. As a member, it is your privilege to participate in the many different activities the curling club scoreboard offers. Please keep in mind that our club’s curling club scoreboard to offer its varied services and events depends greatly on the active participation of the membership, so we encourage you to volunteer whenever and wherever you can, curling club scoreboard. Volunteering is also a great way to get to know other club members. 

Good Curling!

Clothing:

Curling is a sport where ease of movement is critical, curling club scoreboard. It requires bending and stretching during the course of the game which lasts about two hours on the ice surface. You will also wish to be comfortable off the ice as you enjoy both pre- and post-game chats. 

A pair of curling shoes is ideal but if you are just starting this sport, a clean pair of running shoes worn only while curling will do nicely, curling club scoreboard. They MUST NOT be worn outside because even the smallest bit of dirt on the ice surface can cause a rock to go off course. If your shoes are not insulated you will probably wish to wear a very warm pair of socks.  There are also insoles made of reflective material that you can place in your shoes to provide a barrier between your foot and the cold surface.

Your pants should be such that they will allow for plenty of stretch and free movement both during delivery and sweeping, curling club scoreboard. Available on the market are curling pants, jogging suits, stretch leggings, and yoga pants. Curling club scoreboard people find it difficult or uncomfortable to curl in jeans, cords or dress pants, curling club scoreboard. It is also recommended that curling pants not be worn outside in case they may come in contact with road salt or grit, which could then be transferred to the ice surface.

Dressing in layers is suggested for your upper body. At the start of a game you may find it cold or damp on the ice. As the game progresses, with increased movement you may wish to peel off the outer layer. Some people mike austin golf grip, for example, turtleneck, vest, sweater/fleece and jacket. It is preferable not to have fleece as your outermost layer   anytime during the game. The constant rubbing of your arms against your body causes small bits of material to fall on the ice. These can get caught under the rock, causing it to go off course. It will not take you long to know what works best for you. (Skips tend to dress warmly as they sweep less.)

Generally, people wear curling gloves or mitts that have a non-slip palm and keep the hands warm and protected while sweeping. A considerable amount of body heat is lost through your head; some people like to wear a hat.

Curling clothing and equipment can be purchased from Last Rock pro shop. These are suggestions and in short order you will find your own comfortable way to dress.

Equipment:

Little equipment is needed to enjoy this sport. A slider is a piece of Teflon worn on the bottom of your shoe, which allows you to slide smoothly while delivering your rock. The slider can be a separatearticle that attaches to your shoe with an elasticized band or it can be attached directly to your shoe, curling club scoreboard. If your slider is attached to your shoe you will need a gripper, a rubber cover to protect the slider from dirt and to keep you from losing your footing on the ice and on the carpeted area at each end of the sheet.

A broom is the other piece of equipment that is required; they come in a variety of shapes, textures and handle configurations. If you choose not to purchase a broom, there are “club” brooms available for your use.

Glossary of Curling Terms:

Backline: The line across the ice at the back of the house. Stones (or rocks) which are over this line are removed from play.

Biter: A stone that just touches the outer edge of the circles.

Blank End: An end in which no points have been scored.

Bonspiel: A curling competition or tournament.

Burned Stone: A stone in motion touched by a member of either team or byany part of their equipment. The touched stone may be removed from play.

Button: The circle at the centre of the house.

Counter: Any stone in the rings or touching the rings which is a potential point.

Curl: The amount a rock changes directionwhile travelling overthe ice sheet.

Delivery: Right handed deliveries are made with the right foot in the left handed hack. Left handed deliveries are made with the left foot in the right handed hack. The delivery and release of the stone is intended to occur in a reasonably straight line from the hack towards the target broom. 

Draw Weight: The momentum required for a stone to reach the house at the farend of the ice sheet.

End: A portion of a curling game that is completed when each team has thrown eight stones and the score has been decided.

Free Guard Zone (FGZ): The FGZ is the area between the hog line and the tee line excluding the house. Any stationary stone(s) belonging curling club scoreboard the opposition located in the FGZ shall not be removed from play by the delivering team prior to the delivery of the 5th stone of the end. 

Guard: A stone that is placed in a position so that it may protect another stone.

Hacks: The foot-holds at each end of the ice from which the stone is delivered.

Heavy: A rock delivered with a greater force than necessary.

Hog Line: A line 10 meters from the hack at each end of the ice.

Hogged Stone: A stone that does not reach the far hog line. It must be removed from play.

House: The rings or circles toward which play is directed consisting of a foot ring, 8-foot ring, 4-foot ring and a button.

In-Turn: The rotation applied to the handle of a stone that causes it to turn and curl in a clockwise direction for a right-handed curler. For a left-handed curler the rotation is counter-clockwise.

Lead: The first player on a team to deliver a pair of stones for his/her team in each end.

Light: A rock delivered with insufficient force.

Out-Turn: The rotation applied to the handle of a stone that causes it to turn and curl in a counter-clockwise direction for a right-handed curler. For a left-handed curler the rotation is clockwise.

Pebble: A fine spray of water applied to a sheet of curling ice before commencing play.

Raise: When one stone is bumped ahead by another.

Roll: The movement of a curling stone after it has struck a stationary stone in play.

Second: The curler who delivers the second pair of stones for his/her team in each end.

Sheet: The specific playing surface upon which a curling game is played.

Shot Rock: At any time during an end, the stone closest to the button.

Skip: The player who determines the strategy, and directs play for the team. The skip generally but not curling club scoreboard delivers the last pair of stones for his/her team in each end.

Spare: An alternate player or substitute.

Slider: Slippery material placed on the sole of the shoe, to make it easier to slide on the ice during delivery.

Stick: Device used for delivery of a stone. The delivery must start from the hack and be released before the hog line.

Sweeping: The action of moving a broom or brush back and forth in the path of a moving stone. This allows the stone to travel farther and curl less.

Take Out: Removal of a stone from the curling club scoreboard area by hitting it with another stone.

Tee Line: The line that passes through the centre of the house parallel to the hog line and backline.

Third Or Vice-Skip: The third player on a team to throw two stones in each end.  Generally this player acts as the skip when the skip is delivering his/her stones and assists with shot selection decisions.  

Weight: The amount of force given to the stone during the delivery.

The Curling Sheet:

Safety on the Ice:

Curling is not a dangerous sport but serious injuries can occur if you are not careful. The beginning of the season is when the majority of injuries happen. Ice is very hard and very slippery. It is easy to forget this as we get more comfortable. This is when mistakes happen and injuries can occur. Here are a few suggestions to make the season safe:

  • Make sure your shoes have good grip. If not, invest in a gripper to ensure stability.
  • Wear grippers at all times except when throwing rocks. Learning to sweep with two grippers is safe and easy. 
  • Ensure your grippers fit snugly and are not going to fall off.
  • When you step on the ice to throw be sure to get on with your gripper foot first and not your slider. When you get off the ice after throwing the reverse is true, step off with your slider foot first.
  • Look out for other players when moving rocks around on the ice. Also be aware of rocks are being moved near you sport equilibre be ready to move safely out of the way.
  • While it is important to stop rocks from running into the hacks do not put yourself at risk to do so.
  • Take things slowly. While it is important to keep a game moving along at a nice clip, if everyone is where they’re supposed to be, it doesn’t have to be a race. Move on the ice at a safe pace.
  • Be aware of emergency procedures at your club and the location of the first aid kit, defibrillator etc. 

Team Composition:

A Team is made up of four players; a Lead, a Second, a Third or Vice, and a Skip.

Lead

The Lead delivers the first two rocks for the team. After the lead rocks have been delivered, (s)he will then sweep the rocks being delivered by the rest of the team. Leads should also place the Skip’s rock in front of the hack when it is the Skip’s turn to deliver their rocks (this helps to maintain the pace of the game).

Second

The Second delivers the next two rocks for their team and sweeps rocks being delivered by the rest of the team. While sweeping, s/he is also trying to determine how far the rock will travel down the ice.

Third/Vice

The Third is responsible for the coin toss with the opposing Third; the winner usually chooses to have “last rock” for the first end and allows the opposing Third to choose rock colour, although the winner of the toss is also entitled to choose rock colour and allow the other team to have last rock. The team without last rock then delivers their rock first. The Third/Vice delivers the third set of two rocks and is also responsible for sweeping the Lead and Second rocks. It is usually the Third who holds the broom when it is the Skip’s turn to deliver their rocks. After the Skip’s rocks have been delivered, it is the duty of the Thirds from both teams to determine the points scored in the end and perform the measure should it not be clear which rock is in scoring position. If a measure is required and you are unsure how to proceed, ask the opposing Third or the Skips for assistance. The Thirds should be the only people in the House at the conclusion of each end. It is also the responsibility of the Third to mark the score on the ice and on the draw sheets located on the boards in the lounge. The third is best positioned to curling club scoreboard as a coach and mentor for any novices on the team. In that role he or she should give advice and answer questions on rules, technique, curling club scoreboard, etiquette and strategy.

Skip

The Skip stands at the far end of the sheet and holds the broom for the delivery of the rocks by the other team members. The broom is a visual aide for the person delivering their rock, curling club scoreboard. The positioning of the broom is decided by the Skip’s ability to “read” or understand the movement of the rocks on the ice. Positioning of the broom will be dependent on ice conditions, the type of shot being played, curling club scoreboard, and the position of other rocks in and around the house. The Skip who delivers the last rock in the end is said to have “the Hammer&rdquo. The role of the Skip includes: 

  • Making your team aware of curling etiquette.
  • If you observe a member of your team committing a violation of a rule or etiquette gently point out their error. 
  • Setting an example; be courteous and respectful. 
  • Complimenting a good shot by a member of your team.
  • Tailoring your expectations to the ability of your team members. Be considerate of those not quite so talented. 
  • While game strategy is the skip’s responsibility, you should discuss strategy with the Third and be willing to explain your calls to your team members when asked. Strategy decisions should not be drawn out. Taking too much time is unfair on the opposition
  • Knowing the rules so you can assist your team. 

Curling Etiquette:

  • Rules of Play – We subscribe to the rules of the Canadian Curling Association (CCA), casinoextra.fr and the Ontario Curling Association (OCA), casinoextra.fr 
  • Missing a game – If you are unable to play your game, you are responsible for arranging a spare and informing your Skip as early as possible. There is usually a list of spares for your draw, however you may call any member or ask the people who are curling before or after your game.
  • Cancelling your game – If your game needs to be cancelled or rescheduled, the Skip is responsible to inform his/her team and the Skip of the opposing team as early as possible. (S)He should also inform the League Rep.

Before Starting the Game

  • Clean shoes before going on the ice. 
  • Clean brooms over garbage cans so dirt etc. does not fall onto the carpet.
  • Introduce yourself and shake hands with your opponents before the game & wish everyone ‘good curling&rsquo.
  • The Third from one team tosses a coin, while the other team’s third makes the call. Whichever team wins the toss has the option of throwing the last rock, or choosing rock colour. The team curling club scoreboard wins the toss will usually opt for the advantage of last rock, in which case the other team chooses the colour they want. 

During the Game

  • Be ready to throw when it is your turn.
  • The leads who will be throwing the first rock of the end should prepare themselves and their first rock to throw and not assist in clearing the other rocks after the end is over.                  
  • An eight end game should take no more than two hours to play, a six end game, 1 ½ hours – allow 15 minutes per end. This goal can be achieved if the skips plan their strategy while the opposition is delivering their rocks. All team members should be ready to deliver their rock curling club scoreboard it is their turn. As soon as the person delivering the rock before you has released their rock, you can step into the hack, clean your rock and be ready to play as soon as your Skip calls your shot, curling club scoreboard. Keeping the pace of play maintains interest and aids in concentration in the game. The teams using the ice after you will appreciate it also!
  • It is conventional but not necessary to throw the rocks in the order of the numbers on the rocks.
  • Only the skip or third of the delivering team should be in the house. 
  • When your teammate is throwing their rock, sweepers should keep far enough back with their brooms against their bodies so they don't block the sightlines of the thrower. 
  • Similarly, when you have finished sweeping your team's rock and you're walking back down the sheet, keep to the side line. Remember that the other curling club scoreboard will be throwing their rock and that the sightlines down the sheet should be clear. 
  • Sweepers should be between the hog lines and to the side of the ice curling club scoreboard when rocks are delivered so as not to block the view of the opposing player who is throwing.  
  • When an opposing player is in the hack and ready to throw, do not cross the ice or enter the house or in any way interfere with his or her concentration.
  • If you find that you are walking back towards the hack when someone is delivering their rock, you should stand still and remain motionless during the opposing teams’ delivery and while their hand is still on the handle. Remain relatively quiet so the person delivering will not be distracted. Also, keep your broom down and out of the way, but not on the ice surface—the only broom in a stationary position on the ice should belong to the person who has control of the house.
  • It is okay for curling club scoreboard Skip to stand behind the other Skip to watch the line, but the Skip behind should not place the broom vertically on the ice, curling club scoreboard, since this may put the thrower off by seeing two brooms! It is a courtesy for the Skip standing behind to position the broom horizontally across the body. 
  • Sweepers should pay attention to their skip’s call for the next curler on their team so they know what is expected for the next shot.
  • When the final stone of an end comes to rest in the house, leads and seconds should remain well outside the house until the Thirds have measured (if necessary), determined the score, and agreed to move stones. Do not move any rock until the Thirds have given the okay. 
  • Compliment your opponent for a good shot. One of the nicest curling traditions is that players and spectators compliment a good shot by either side while not remarking on a poor shot or a competitor’s misfortune.
  • After the end is completed all rocks should be returned to their designated area; being in proper order is not necessary. This will also help keep the game on pace. The Lead who is delivering the first rock in the new end should be getting ready while the rocks are being gathered.

After the Game

  • Both teams shake hands after a game. If people are having a sociable drink after the game, it's considered good etiquette to sit with your opposition. Each member of the winning team offers to buy a beverage for the corresponding position on the other team. Normally later, the other team reciprocates but this is not mandatory.   Drinks are available in our downstairs bar/lounge. Please do not bring alcoholic drinks into the ice area.
  • Arrange rocks in numerical order once the game is complete.

Suggestions for Finishing a Game on Time

  • Be on time. Please be ready to curl your first rock right on time.  If you are playing the first scheduled game of the draw your ice curling club scoreboard be ready before you get there. Occasionally the game before you may finish early. Get to the club in time to change and warm up before your start time, curling club scoreboard. When you are late you are holding up seven other players. If you know you may be late, let your Skip know; they can start without you.
  • There may be occasions when you are unable to curl as scheduled. It is your responsibility to get a substitute. Call your skip and give the name of the curler sparing for you or the names of the people you have called. No shows are a no-no!
  • If your team leads off on any particular end, the Lead should gather their rock, curling club scoreboard, clean it and do their pre-shot routine while the Third and the Second put the rocks away.  
  • Players should always be ready to deliver their rock as soon as the Skip asks for it. Do not wait until the Skip places the broom to clean your rock. 
  • Be courteous. Don’t distract the person in the hack. 
  • Sweepers, be sure to walk back to the delivering end as close to the sidelines as possible so as not to block the line of delivery of the next person. 
  • Leads or Seconds, place your Skip’s rock in front of the Hack while the Skip and Third are setting up the Skip’s shot.
  • Skips, keep the game moving by minimizing delays in making decisions, curling club scoreboard. Avoid long conferences. You are in charge of the game. It’s rock science, not rocket science.

 

Sweeping:

  • Any member of the team may sweep their team’s rock up to the T-line; only one sweeper may do so after the rock has crossed the T-line. The opposing team’s rock may only be swept by you after it crosses the T-line.  
  • You are not permitted to “warm up the ice”, i.e. sweep any rock that is stationary.
  • You may only sweep a rock that is in motion. 
  • While sweeping, you will need to communicate to your Skip where you believe the rock will come to rest and sweep the rock accordingly so that it ends up where the Skip has requested (no mean task). 
  • The two team members who are not currently throwing, travel beside and sweep (as necessary) the rock being delivered by their teammate, curling club scoreboard. The purpose of sweeping is to help a rock travel further or keep it straight, curling club scoreboard. To be safe and effective, sweepers should be positioned on opposite sides of the running rock.
  • The Skip or Third is viewing the line of the rock as it travels down the ice. (S)He will call on the sweepers to start or stop curling club scoreboard at any given time.  It is difficult for the Skip to judge the speed of the rock, curling club scoreboard. Communication from the sweepers helps the Skip determine where the rock will come to rest.

 

Factors Influencing Shot Selection:

  1. Free Guard Zone (FGZ) Rule —The Free Guard Zone Rule influences shot selection relative to the first four stones of an end and impacts strategy decisions throughout the course of a game. The FGZ Rule provides substantial opportunities for offense including comebacks in the middle and late ends of a game with or without last rock. 
  2. Score—The score in relation to the end you are playing will greatly influence shot election decisions. 
  3. Last Rock—Last rock advantage plays a key role in shot selection decisions, curling club scoreboard. Having last rock advantage may result in a more offensive approach. Not having last rock may dictate a defensive approach. 
  4. Ability—The skills of opponents and teammates required to successfully play both offense and defense are critical to planning strategy and making appropriate shot selection. Knowing the position by position strengths and weaknesses of the team and the opposition will have a great impact on the game strategy. The strategy you design for your team and the shot selections you make during a game should be based on the abilities of the individual players and the team as a unit. 
  5. Ice—Ice conditions will play a key factor in determining the strategy a team is able to apply. Fast, swingy ice will produce optimum playing conditions. Straight ice conditions will restrict the aggressive come around approach and may dictate a raise style game plan. It is important to note that, of these factors, last rock advantage and the relative skills of both the team and the opposing team are the main factors that influence shot selections for the developing curler. 

 

Scoring:

Most club and bonspiel games are eight ends. Competitive games are often ten ends. In each end the rock(s) of the same colour closest to the centre of the house count as one point each. The score and any measuring is determined by curling club scoreboard Thirds of both teams; all other players should remain outside the Hog line. 

 

Scoreboard etiquette: While spectators enjoy having the score posted quickly after the completion of an end, curling etiquette does exist in certain situations where delaying or even not posting the score would be considered a sportsmanlike gesture. For example, curling club scoreboard, if after 3 or 4 ends, a team is leading by 7 or more (for example), then further scoring should be postponed until the trailing rink counts an end – please use your judgment. In these situations, it can be considered unsportsmanlike to rush and immediately post the results of an end.

 

The etiquette of conceding a win/loss game: After the completion of any end, a team may concede a game by the conceding skip offering to shake hands with the skip of the winning team. After a team has conceded, they may still play for fun if time allows (no score). If time is short, good etiquette is to concede a game when all chances of winning the game are gone. This will allow the ice crew time to prepare the sheet for the next game to start on time. E.g. If a team needs 4 to tie the game on the 8th end, curling club scoreboard, and by their third’s first stone is not laying at least one, then there is no hope and a skip’s handshake is proper etiquette.

 

At the end of the game, the Third should note the final score and the number of ends won by their team. This information is then recorded on the big west beach volleyball tournament sheet in the lounge. As a courtesy, often the winning Third will record the information for both teams.

 

Port Perry's Scoreboard:

Our club uses Club style scoreboards where the centre numbers on the score board represent the score of the match. The cards hung above or below the center numbers are the ends played and they show the accumulated points scored by the team up to and including that end. The number on the card represents the End. Depending on which team has scored, the end number is hung either under or above the number that represents the total number of points scored to that point in the game.

PORT PERRY CURLING CLUB

 

 

   

[2]

 

[3]

      
 

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

 

[7]

 

[1]

   

[4]

 

[6]

   

Blank Ends [5]

Sample Game:

[1]Yellow scores 3 points in the first end.  [Yellow leads ]

[2]Red scores 4 points in the second end.  [Red leads ]

[3]Red scores 2 points in the third end.  [Red leads ]

[4]Yellow scores 4 points in the fourth end.  [Yellow leads ]

[5]No points were scored (blank end) in the fifth end. The card is hung in the Blank Ends area.  [Yellow leads ]

[6]Yellow scores 2 points in the sixth end.  [Yellow leads ]

[7]Yellow scores 4 points in the seventh end. For a score that is higher than the scoreboard’s center numbers, the end number is posted using a “wrap around&rdquo. This indicates the score is twelve higher than the center number.  [Yellow leads ]

[8]The eighth end is in progress.  

 

Competition Scoreboard:

Some clubs and many televised curling events use the International style scoreboard and the score is marked in the same manner as on a baseball scoreboard. The Ends are at the top of the scoreboard. There is a box below the scoreboard containing numbers. The scoring team’s Third chooses the number that corresponds to the number of points scored in each end and hangs it beside the colour of rocks that were in scoring position and under the corresponding End.

Baseball-style scoreboard

Team

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

Final

    Canada

0

2

1

1

0

6

0

0

x

x

10

    Finland

2

0

0

0

1

0

0

1

x

x

4


Источник: [casinoextra.fr]

Once you understand how to score points in curling, the next step is to be able to read the scoreboard. This is something that takes a bit of time to get used to, especially as there are two different ways that scoreboards work in this sport. Below we will explain both of them, which we will refer to as &#;Ends On Top&#; and &#;Points In The Middle&#;, curling club scoreboard.

The curling club scoreboard example is the type of scoreboard you curling club scoreboard see if you are watching the Olympics or a high-level curling competition such as the Brier or the Scotties. These scoreboards have the &#;Ends On Top&#; which are shown below in white numbers. Remember that in curling, only one team can score in each end. This means that there will always be a &#;0&#; for at least one of the teams in each end. If the end is a blank end, curling club scoreboard, then both teams would have a &#;0&#.

This style of scoreboard is perhaps the easiest to read, as the number underneath each end simply shows how many points that team scored in the end. Add up all of the points in each row and that gives you the total score, shown above as for the final of this game.

However, in most curling clubs these &#;Ends On Top&#; scoreboards are not used. This is because most rinks still use wooden or metal boards, curling club scoreboard, and are not equipped with digital ones. Therefore, you&#;d need to be prepared with at least 10 of each number (especially 0&#;s, 1&#;s, and 2&#;s) to place underneath each end. Considering that some rinks have many sheets of ice, this is not realistic.

Instead, most curling rinks with traditional boards use the &#;Points In The Middle&#; system shown in the image below. Here, the numbers place in the Yellow & Red zones are the ends, placed curling club scoreboard the points.

Scoreboards <div><h2>How To Read A Curling Scoreboard</h2><div><p>Home>Sports>Curling>Curling How To</p><p>PreviousNext</p><div><p>Curling is divided up into ends. An end consists of each team alternating throwing 8 stones each (in the order as described above). After all 16 stones have been thrown (8 from each team), the end is scored. The score also affects which team gets the hammer, which is the last shot advantage for the next end.</p></div><hr><div><h3>The Scoreboard</h3><p>In curling, the scoreboard keeps track of the score for the entire game. The score is updated on an end-by-end basis. There are two types of scoreboards in curling, ones that have the ends on top and ones that have the ends in the middle. Both scoreboards keep track of the score, but show it in different ways.</p></div><div><h3>Ends on Top</h3><p>If you have seen a scoreboard while watching curling on television, you have seen a scoreboard where the ends are listed on top, <b>curling club scoreboard</b>. The numbers one through ten are arranged in order, <i>curling club scoreboard</i>. Usually, a curling game will last ten ends, <i>curling club scoreboard</i>. Sometimes, you will see an 11 on the scoreboard in case the score is tied after ten ends and another end is needed to determine the winner.</p><p>On the far left of the scoreboard are the team names. One of the team names is followed by an asterisk or hammer, <b>curling club scoreboard</b>. This indicates which team had the hammer in the first end. We will learn about the hammer later on in Curling Scoring.</p><p>Lastly, the right side of the scoreboard has a space for the total score.</p><p>On this type of scoreboard, the score for each end is posted. The score will show which team scored, and the number of points scored. The team that didn't score receives a score of zero for that end. If neither team scored, both teams <b>curling club scoreboard</b> a score of zero for that end.</p></div><div><h3>Score in the Middle</h3><p>Another type of scoreboard in curling is much different than what you are used to seeing on television. This scoreboard contains the score in the middle of the scoreboard, <i>curling club scoreboard</i>, typically up to 16 or 18 points. On the left side of the scoreboard, there is a team name above and below the score, with a space to indicate which team had the hammer in the first end.</p><p>Instead of a score being posted, the cumulative score is posted on an end-by-end basis. For example, if Team A scored 2 points in the first end, and 1 point in the second end, a

To summarize this type of scoreboard, your cumulative score is maintained, and your end-by-end score can be determined from reading the scoreboard, curling club scoreboard. This type of scoreboard is helpful because you can see which team is winning faster than calculating the scores from previous ends.

PreviousNext

PreviousNext

Источник: [casinoextra.fr]

Alternate     

 A registered, non-playing member of the team who is eligible to substitute for one of the competing players.    

Away Curling club scoreboard    

 The end of the sheet to which the first stone of a game is delivered.

Back Board / Bumper     

 Material (e.g. foam or wood) placed at the end (perimeter) of each sheet of ice.

Back House Weight    

 The speed given to a stone at delivery so that it will just reach the back of the house.  

Back Line    

 A line at the back of the house, extending across the width of the sheet, which is parallel to and located m. (6 ft.) from each tee line.

Back of the House   

The area within the house that lies between the tee line and the back line.

Biter

A stone that just touches the outer edge of the outside circle of the house.


Blank End

An end steelhead bike rack in no score for either team.


Bonspiel

A curling competition or tournament.


Brush (Broom)

A device used by players to sweep/clean the ice in front of a moving stone.


Button

The small circle at the centre of the house.


Burned Stone

A stone in motion touched by a player or any part of a players equipment.


Centre Line

The line dividing the playing surface down the middle. It joins the midpoints of the tee lines and extends m. (12 ft.) beyond the centre of each tee line.


CirclesSee definition: House.


Competition

Any number of teams playing games to determine a winner.


Come Around

A shot that curls behind another stone.


Counter

Any stone in or touching the house and is considered a potential point.


Courtesy Line

A line indicating where the sweepers from the non-delivering team are allowed to stand in order to ensure that an umpire can view the hog line and to prevent distraction of a delivering player.


Curl

The curved path of a stone as it travels down the sheet of ice.


Delivering End

The end of the sheet from which the stones are being delivered.


Delivering Team

The team that is currently in control of the playing area, and scheduled to deliver the next stone.


Delivery

The motion a player makes when playing a curling stone.


Delivery Stick

A device which attaches to the handle of the stone and acts as an extension of the arm/hand during the delivery process.


Displaced Stone

A stationary stone that has been moved to a new location.


Divider Material

(e.g. foam or wood) used to separate the sheets of curling ice.


Double Takeout

A stone that removes two of the opponents stones from play.


Draw

A stone which stops inside or in front of the house.


Draw Raise

A stone that bumps another stone into the house.


Draw Shot Challenge curling club scoreboard

The calculation made by taking the average distance of the Last Stone Draws (LSD), excluding the least favourable LSD, and used, if required, to assist in the determination of ranking after a round robin.


Draw Weight

The momentum required for a delivered stone to reach the house at the playing end.


Electronic Hog Line Device

A device that indicated if a stone was released by a player before the stone reached the hog line at the delivering end.


End

A portion of a curling game that is completed when each team has thrown eight stones and/or the score has been decided.


Equipment

Anything that is worn or carried by a player.


Extra End

An additional end played to break a tie at the end of regulation play.


External Force

An occurrence not caused by either team.


First Player

The first curler on a team to deliver two stones in each end.


Fourth Player

The fourth curler on a team to deliver two stones in each end.


Free Guard Zone (FGZ)

The area at the playing end, between the hog line and the tee line, curling club scoreboard excluding the house.


Freeze

A form of a draw shot that stops directly up against another stone.


Front House Weight

The momentum required for a delivered stone to reach the front part of the house at the playing end.


Game

Two teams playing a specified number of ends to determine a winner.


Guard

A stone that is placed in a position so that it may protect another stone.


Hack

The foot-hold at each end of the ice which is used by a player to start the delivery of a curling stone.


Hack Line

A small line m. (1 ft. 6 in.) parallel to the tee line, at each end of the centre line.


Hack Weight

The momentum required for a delivered stone to reach the hack at the playing end.


Handle

The part of a curling stone that a player grips in order to deliver.


Hammer

A term used to describe the stone which will be the last stone delivered in that end.


Heavy

A stone delivered with a greater speed than necessary.


Hit

A take-out. Removal of a stone from the playing area by hitting it with another stone.


Hit and Roll

A stone that knocks an opponent's stone out of play, and then rolls to another position in play.


Hog Line

A line extending across the width of the sheet that is parallel to and located m. (21 ft.) from each tee line.


Hog Line Violation

A stone that is removed from play for the end, because bsp 21 swimming pool was not released before it reached the hog line at the delivering end.


Hogged Stone

A stone that is removed from play for the end, because after being delivered, it did not come to rest completely beyond the inside edge of the hog line at the playing end.


Home End

The end of the sheet from which the first stone of a game is delivered.


House

The area within the concentric circles at each end of the sheet.


Hurry

A command which instructs players to sweep harder.


Ice Surface

The complete ice area that is within the perimeters of the curling sheet.


In the Process of Delivery

The sequence of play that begins when the delivering player is positioned in the hack and concludes when the stone is released.


In-turn

The rotation applied to the handle of a stone by a right handed curler which causes the stone to rotate in a clockwise manner.


Last Stone Draw (LSD)

A contest conducted at the conclusion of a teams pre-game practice in which each team delivers a single stone to the tee at the home end. The resulting distance is measured and used to determine which team has the choice of delivering the first or second stone in the first end.


Lead

The first player on a team to deliver two stones in each end.


Mathematically Eliminated

The status of a team that has a combined total of stones left to be delivered and/or remaining in play that is less than the number needed to produce either a tie or a win.


Measuring Device

An instrument that determines which stone is closer to the centre of the house (Tee), or whether a stone curling club scoreboard in the house.


Moving Stone

A stone in motion either from a delivery or from being struck by another stone.


Original Position of a Stone

The location on the ice where a stone rested prior to its being displaced.


Out-of-play Position

The location of a stone that is not in play (e.g. one which has touched a side line, or crossed the back line).


Out-turn

The rotation applied to the handle of a stone by a right handed curler which causes the stone to rotate in a counter-clockwise manner.


Pebble

The water droplets applied to a sheet of ice before commencing play. These droplets freeze, which then reduces the friction between the ice and the stones.


Peel

A shot designed to remove a guard.


Playing End

The end of the sheet to which the stones are being delivered.


Point

At the completion of an end, one is awarded to a team for each of its own stones located in or touching the house that is closer to the tee than any stone of the opposition.


Port

An opening, or gap, between stones.


Positioned Stones

In Mixed Doubles games, the two stones that are placed in designated positions prior to the start of each end.


Raise

A type of draw which bumps forward another stone.


Raise Takeout

A delivered stone hits a stationary stone, which then starts to move and it hits a third stone out of play.


Rings See definition: House.


Rock See definition: Stone.


Roll

The sideways movement of a curling stone after it has struck a stationary stone.


Round Robin

A competition in which each team plays all the other teams.


Score

The number of points received by a team in an end.


Scoring

A team scores one point for each of its stones that is within the house and closer to the tee than any stone of the opposing team.


Second Player

The second curler on a team to deliver two stones in each end.


Sheet

The specific ice surface upon which a curling game is played.


Shot curling club scoreboard or rock)

At any time during an end, curling club scoreboard, the stone curling club scoreboard to the tee.


Side Line

A line placed at the side (perimeter) of each sheet of ice.


Skip

The player who directs play for the team.


Slider

Slippery material placed on the sole of the sliding shoe, curling club scoreboard, which makes it easier to slide on curling club scoreboard ice.


Spare See definition: Alternate.


Stationary Stone

A stone in play which is not in motion.


Stone

Also known as a rock, a curling stone is made of granite and is delivered by the players in a curling game.


Stone Set in Motion

A stationary stone hit by another stone which causes it to move.


Sweeping

The action of moving a broom or brush back and forth in front of the path of a moving stone to clean or polish the ice surface.


Swingy Ice

The condition of the ice or stones causing the stones to have excessive curl.


Takeout

Removal of a stone from the playing area by hitting it with another stone.


Team

Four players competing together. A team may include a fifth player (to act as an alternate) and a casinoextra.fr Doubles have one male and one female player, and may include a coach.

Tee

The exact centre of the house.


Tee Line

A line extending across the width of the sheet that passes through the centre of the house parallel to the hog line and backline.


Third Player

The third curler on a team to deliver two curling club scoreboard in each end.


Time-Out

Stoppage of play called by a team or umpire.


Top of the House

The area within the house that lies between the hog line and the tee line.


Umpire

The person(s) responsible for the conduct of the game in accordance with the rules.


Vice-Skip

(Mate or Acting Skip) The player who directs play for the team when it is the Skip's turn to deliver,


Weight

The amount of force/speed given to the stone during the delivery.


Wheelchair Lines

Two lines that run from the hog line to the outermost edge of the nearest circle of the casinoextra.frhair curlers are allowed to start their delivery with the stone placed between these lines.

 

Source: casinoextra.fr 

Источник: [casinoextra.fr]

Scores

LIVE SPORTS, SPORTSCENTRE AND MORE – STREAM ON TSN DIRECT!

TSN
    • NHL
      • Flames rise high, Habs rock bottom in NHL Power Ranking
      • Forsberg, Predators stay hot with victory over Kings
      • Marchessault scores twice, Golden Knights beat Rangers
      • NHL: Rangers 1, Golden Knights 5
      • NHL: Blue Jackets 1, Devils 3
      • NHL: Panthers 5, Stars 6 (SO)
      • NHL: Penguins 6, Flyers 2
      • Landeskog hat trick, five points from MacKinnon help Avs rout Jets
      • NHL: Flames 1, Lightning 4
      • Larsson's 1st hat trick powers Coyotes past Blackhawks
      • What led to Winnipeg's second period let down?
      • Benn, Stars exit COVID protocols with win over Panthers
      • Boldy nets 1st NHL goal as Wild edge Bruins; Kaprizov exits with injury
      • Kucherov has two assists in return; Lightning beat Flames
      • Devils beat Blue Jackets for 4th win in 5 games
      • Penguins beat Flyers for 10th straight victory
      • Sharks end two-game skid with win over Sabres
    • CFL
      • Bombers reach extension with DL Jefferson, nearing deal with DE Jeffcoat
      • Mace officially named new Argos defensive co-ordinator
      • Calvillo joins Alouettes staff as QB coach
      • Blue Bombers sign OT Hardrick to contract extension
      • 3 Downs: Elks and Stamps ink QBs, Calvillo returns to Alouettes
      • Reinebold heads to Montreal as special team coach
      • Elks re-work QB Arbuckle's contract
      • Blue Bombers sign receiver Blake Jackson
      • Calvillo joins Alouettes staff as QB coach
      • Stamps, Begelton agree to terms on one-year deal
      • Stampeders re-sign defensive lineman Orimolade
      • Thomas to return for 10th season with Blue Bombers
      • Stampeders add QB Stevens
      • Elks sign three Canadians, curling club scoreboard, including veteran lineman Foucault
      • Stampeders extend OL Good-Jones through
      • Blue Bombers, Canadian DB Hallett agree to one-year extension
      • Tiger-Cats to announce new ownership structure
      • Tiger-Cats announce new ownership structure
      • Reinebold leaving Ticats after seven seasons with club
      • Stampeders sign QB Maier to contract extension
    • NFL
      • Packers OC Hackett to interview with Jaguars
      • NFL Spotlight: Bucs cut Antonio Brown
      • Schefter on AB saga: 'Both sides again make their own claims about what unfolded'
      • Bucs release Antonio Brown, say he was cleared to play
      • Top NFL plays of the season
      • Ex-NFL RB Portis sentenced to six months for fraud scheme
      • LSU cornerback Stingley Jr. to enter NFL draft
      • Arians claims Brown was upset about targets
      • What took the Bucs so long to release Antonio Brown
      • Orlovsky: Colts the team 'best-built' to beat the Chiefs
      • Orlovsky blasts MVP voter who said he wouldn't vote for Rodgers
      • Bears put QB Fields on reserve/COVID list
      • Buccaneers respond to Brown's allegations, terminate contract
      • Irvin shares whether he trusts Herbert or Carr more with the season on the line
      • Steelers place WR Johnson, C Green on Reserve-COVID list
      • Woody: Antonio Brown's statement is 'eye-opening'
      • Carr, curling club scoreboard, Raiders preparing for potential all-or-nothing showdown with rival Chargers
      • Antonio Brown explains his side of the story, says he was cut before leaving field
      • Brown says he was forced to play on injured ankle
    • NBA
      • DeRozan: We're all playing with a chip on our shoulder
      • Must See: 6-foot-3 Gary Payton II wins jump ball over 7-footer Jonas Valanciunas
      • NBA: Clippers 89, Suns
      • Udoka rips Celtics' 'lack of mental toughness' after blowing lead
      • Randle says thumbs-down gesture meant hush boos at MSG
      • Paul has triple-double, NBA-leading Suns top Clippers
      • NBA: CelticsKnicks
      • Non-boosted NBAers to be tested daily through All-Star break
      • Ingram scores 32, Pelicans beat depleted Warriors
      • NBA: Curling club scoreboard 96, Pelicans
      • Report: Kawhi ahead of schedule in ACL rehab
      • NBA: Pistons 88, Grizzlies
      • Morant, Grizzlies rout lowly Pistons for 7th straight win
      • Barrett banks in winner as Knicks complete comeback against Celtics
      • Must See: RJ Barrett banks in desperation 3 at the buzzer as Knicks stun Celtics
      • NBA fines Kings $50, AGM Wilcox $15,
      • Jazz's Gobert, Bucks' Holiday enter NBA's health and safety protocols
      • Wizards announcer Consor apologizes to Porter for comment
      • Perkins' top-5 international NBA players
      • Warriors' Curry (quad), Green (hip) miss game against Pelicans
    • Golf
      • PGA: Sentry Tournament of Champions - Rd. 1
      • Cantlay, Rahm don't miss beat with good starts at Kapalu
      • Stricker details battle with mysterious illness after captaining U.S. at Ryder Cup
      • Tiger's return among questions for golf's new year
      • Hovland reunited with clubs ahead of Sentry Tournament of Champions
      • Speed Golf: Who will be No. 1 in the world a year from now?
      • Kapalua means time for Rahm and Cantlay to get back to work
      • Champ withdraws from PGA Tour's Sentry Tournament of Champions
      • Bob Weeks Picks Six: Sentry Tournament of Champions
      • Canadian Golf Rankings - January 3,
      • PGA TOUR Canada announces Qualifying Tournament schedule
      • Golf offered up plenty of memorable and forgettable moments in
      • Players to get Saudi release with pledge to return to Pebble
      • Tiger, son sink 11 straight birdies, but Daly duo win PNC Championship
      • Final golf ranking of brings Masters field to 83, includes Canadian Hughes
      • Woods returns with three shots that look like the Tiger of old
      • Woods returns to golf, still 'long way' from the real thing
      • Woods has 'an awesome day' with son in return to golf at PNC Championship pro-am
      • Woods said to be 'crazy good' as he prepares for golf return
      • Spieth and caddie looking for an edge in reading putts
    • Soccer
      • TFC’s Laryea to join English Championship club Nottingham Forest
      • CanMNT cancels Florida training camp
      • Canada's Priestman not on list of final nominees for FIFA coaching award
      • Manchester City dealing with COVID outbreak; Four Serie A games postponed
      • TFC’s Laryea to join English Championship club Nottingham Forest
      • Turkish Super Cup: Besiktas 1, Antalyaspor 1 ( PK)
      • Davies tests positive for COVID; David doing well after testing positive
      • Chelsea gifted goals by Spurs to gain cup semifinal lead
      • Canada's Atiba Hutchinson named man of the match in Besiktas' Turkish Super Cup win
      • Barcelona rallies to beat third-tier team in Copa opener
      • US women to face Iceland, New Zealand and Czech Republic
      • St. Louis MLS expansion team hires Carnell as coach
      • Bradley brings experience, enthusiasm and hope to Toronto FC
      • Canada's Labbe one of three finalists for FIFA goalkeeping award
      • Canada's Davies tests positive for COVID
      • Kawabe joins Wolverhampton from Grasshoppers
      • Liverpool closes training centre as COVID cases rise
      • Report: Insigne to join Toronto FC in blockbuster MLS deal
      • Southampton bought by firm fronted by Serbian media giant
    • Curling
      • Curling on TSN Broadcast Schedule
      • Waiting Game: After cancellation of mixed doubles trials, curlers waiting on decision
      • Ontario Scotties suspended due to provincial restrictions
      • Tournament of Hearts and Brier Playdowns
      • Which Canadian mixed doubles team should be selected for Beijing?
      • Curling Roster Tracker
      • Canada's Olympic mixed doubles curling trials cancelled due to COVID
      • Former Bottcher vice Moulding to join Team Grattan
      • Kennedy joins Gushue's curling curling club scoreboard as Olympic alternate
      • Epping outlasts Koe in Banff, Walker wins in Avonair as playdowns near
      • Kennedy will join Team Gushue at Beijing Olympics as an alternate
      • Zacharias captures Manitoba Scotties title, Homan qualifies for Ontario playdowns
      • Curling Canada finalizes team field for mixed-doubles trials
      • St-Georges/Asselin, Carey/Hodgson qualify for Mixed Doubles Trials
      • Sex toy ads removed from ice at Olympic curling qualifier
      • Moulding not planning to make decision on curling future until New Year
      • Americans Plys, Persinger make Olympic mixed doubles field
      • Continental Cup cancelled due to 'travel restrictions, isolation requirements'
      • Einarson, Jacobs team up for Canadian mixed doubles trials
    • NCAA
      • Bama extends Saban through
      • Duke coach-in-waiting Scheyer: Goal is to 'win the whole damn thing' for Krzyzewski
      • Manziel says he made 'decent living' selling autographs at Texas A&M
      • Duke coach Krzyzewski to retire after season
      • Who is Jon Scheyer? Meeting the Duke basketball assistant who will be Coach K's successor
      • Bush, Luck, Lynch among nominees for College Football Hall of Fame
      • UCLA's Riley enters NBA draft, not hiring agent
      • Canada's Amanda wins MAC Hermann Trophy
      • Robert Morris cuts men's and women's hockey
      • Metchie wins Cornish Trophy as outstanding Canadian in NCAA football
      • Former LSU starting quarterback Finley transferring to Auburn
      • Former MSU player Appling arrested in connection to fatal shooting
      • UConn extends Auriemma through
      • Santa Clara wins College Cup on penalties over Florida State
      • Marshall wins first-ever College Cup with OT win over Indiana
      • Former Hawaii standout Brennan dead at 37
      • Jordan game-worn North Carolina jersey sells for $ million
      • Texas linebacker Ehlinger found dead
      • Hubbard, Metchie among Cornish finalists
      • Three Canadian soccer players among 15 semifinalists for MAC Hermann Trophy
    • Tennis
      • Auger-Aliassime stuns Zverev in first-ever top five win, Canada reaches ATP Cup semis
      • Djokovic to remain in visa limbo until Monday as he fights deportation from Australia
      • Daily Australian Open coverage on TSN
      • Australian PM on Djokovic: Rules are rules
      • Nadal on Djokovic: 'If he wanted, he would be playing here in Australia without a problem'
      • Djokovic's mother: They are keeping him prisoner
      • Canada advances to ATP Cup semifinals
      • Nadal wins opening match; Osaka also advances
      • Djokovic in limbo as he fights deportation from Australia
      • Wertheim on Djokovic: 'It's just another instance of self-sabotage'
      • Fifth-seeded Swiatek defeats Fernandez in Adelaide
      • PTI's Wilbon and Kornheiser applaud Australia for denying Djokovic entry
      • Australia cancels visa of world No.1 Djokovic, asks him to leave country
      • Barty opens her season with win over Gauff in Adelaide
      • Spain beats Serbia, joins Poland in ATP Cup semifinals
      • Djokovic has visa cancelled; told to leave Australia
      • Osaka opens season with win over Cornet
      • Shapovalov, Auger-Aliassime lead Canada past Great Britain at ATP Cup
      • Djokovic receives medical exemption to play at Australian Open
Источник: [casinoextra.fr]

Scoreboards

Anyone who has seen curling in a big arena or in the Olympics probably has seen the score displayed much like a baseball score. The scoreboard has a row at the top of the board showing the end played (like an inning), and two rows below that showing each team's score.

Most curling clubs use a traditional curling scoreboard - which can be confusing because it looks somewhat like a baseball scoreboard. But for curling, the movable numbers represent the ends - and therefore there are only 10 or 11 of them, curling club scoreboard. The fixed numbers - green in this illustration - along the center show the score. At the end of each end, the vice-skip (usually) of the scoring team posts the end number next to the score they have now achieved. In this picture, Yellow scored 1 point in the first end, so they posted "1" along the yellow line over curling club scoreboard green score of "1.' In the second end, Red scored curling club scoreboard points, so they posted the "2" along the red line under the green score of "3."

The furthest end number to the right represents the score on the center scale. In this case, Yellow won 8 to 6. So end by end:

  1. Yellow scored 1, score now yellow
  2. Red curling club scoreboard 3, score now red
  3. Yellow scored 3, score now yellow
  4. Red scored 1, score now
  5. Yellow scored 1, score now yellow
  6. Red scored 1, score now
  7. Yellow scored 1, score now yellow
  8. Yellow stole 2, score now yellow
  9. Red scored 1, final score yellow

We call it a steal when a team scores in spite of not throwing the last rock (having the hammer), curling club scoreboard. The H next to yellow indicates they had hammer in the first end.

If an end is blanked (no score), the number for that end is hung to the side of the scoreboard so you can see the end has been played.

Источник: [casinoextra.fr]