Lucky lobsters swim team

lucky lobsters swim team

Good Luck to our Lucky's Lobsters Swim Team today as they compete at the NENEAPC Sectional Swim Meet at UMASS Lowell! Go Lobsters! Join us for an Alumni Swim Meet! James L. McKeown Boys & Girls Club of Woburn's photo. 100% of proceeds benefit Lucky's Lobsters Swim Team! Fort Lauderdale resident William Roughen, of the Maler Buddy Team, shows off his 4.1-pound Florida lobster that earned him the second-place.

Magnificent: Lucky lobsters swim team

Lucky lobsters swim team
TRIFONCTION TRIATHLON LONGUE DISTANCE
Lucky lobsters swim team
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Lucky lobsters swim team - final

Lucky’s Lobsters Swim Team

2021-2022 Swim Team Information

Updated 1/4/2022

**Reminder – Swim Team payments are now past due. Please make payment arrangements ASAP.

PRACTICE GROUPS

2021-2022 Lucky’s Lobsters Assigned Practice Groups

*At this time, our team is at capacity and not taking any new swimmers. Thank you for understanding.


PRACTICE SCHEDULE

*NEW – January Practice Calendar Now Available Below

Swimmers are encouraged to attend their assigned practice times as frequently as possible in order to develop their strength, strokes and stamina. Swimmers will enter and exit through the pool door that is to the far left of the Club building when looking from the parking lot. Attendance will be taken each evening as swimmers enter those doors. Swimmers who are already at the Club participating in Clubhouse activities should enter through the locker rooms and be sure to check in with a coach!

January 2022 Swim Team Schedule – List Version

January 2022 Swim Team Schedule – Calendar Version


SWIM MEET SCHEDULE

*Depending on the size and ages of the other team, timing will vary at each meet. For health and safety reasons, we will break up each meet by age groups to keep the number of swimmers and spectators as low as we’re able to.

11/13/21:  Boys & Girls Club of Dorchester RESULTS

11/20/21:  Boys & Girls Club of Greater Billerica – Ages 10 & Under RESULTS

11/20/21:  Boys & Girls Club of Greater Billerica – Ages 11 and Over RESULTS

12/11/21:  Arlington Boys & Girls Club RESULTS

12/18/21:  Blue Hill & Salem, NH RESULTS

CANCELLED – 1/8/22: HOME meet with Lawrence

1/22/22: HOME meet with Watertown


REGISTRATION & PRICING

Swimmers MUST bring a 2021-2022 JLM Boys & Girls Club Membership Application to their first practice. Coaches will collect them at the door. Please ensure the application is easy to read and that every question is answered. This will save time at the door. (Members who are already participating in the Club’s afterschool program do NOT need to bring a form with them.)

Pricing for the Season:

Pre-Comp Skills & Comp Skills: $200 per swimmer (includes annual $25 membership fee)

Junior, White, Blue: $325 per swimmer (includes annual $25 membership fee)

You will receive an invoice to pay for the program AFTER your membership application is turned in, with a link to pay online. Please do not make any credit card payments until you receive your invoice. If you prefer to pay by check, you may attach a check to your membership application. All payments are due by 10/31/2021. Families with outstanding balances from last season must make arrangements for a payment plan in order to join the team.


About the Swim Team

Lucky’s Lobsters is a competitive & recreational swim program for swimmers ages 6-18. The regular season takes place September through February. The team competes in the NENEAPC swim league against area Boys & Girls Clubs from November through January. An option also exists each year for families to travel to Florida for the Boys & Girls Club Swimming Championships.


Acknowledgements

Congratulations to our swimmers for becoming the 2018-2019 NENEAPC Division 1 Champions!

Источник: [https://torrent-igruha.org/3551-portal.html]


The Charters

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FULL DAY CRUISE (8 HRS)
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“Cool Cat” will glide across the Turquoise  Caribbean waters. You can absorb Antigua’s natural beauty & picturesque views as we sail past many beautiful bays & lovely homes & resorts. We anchor for a relaxing  swim or snorkel while your hosts prepare a delicious Caribbean BBQ lunch. After lunch we set sail again to the clear waters of Cades Reef where the marine life and coral are abundant. Our last stop will be at one of Antiguas 365 beaches. We sail back to Jolly harbour while you admire a spectacular sunset & listen to the sounds of water lapping up against the hull.  

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HALF DAY CRUISE (6HRS)
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Once we leave the dock our sails are hoisted and so your journey begins ! We sail to Cades Reef to sample the incredible fish and coral life. With water so clear, you would think your in your very own swimming pool. We will show you “Tim’s wreck”. A sailboat that sank a few years ago and is always a fascinating sight to see. After your freshly grilled lunch there’s plenty of time to relax, snorkel or just float around in the ocean before we set sail to one of Antigua’s 365 beaches for more snorkeling, swimming or a stroll on the beach.

 

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lobster lunchLUNCH CRUISE (4 HRS)
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Seaside Dining – Antigua Style. Your elegance cruise starts with a gentle sail aboard Antigua’s most luxurious catamaran. We sail to beautiful white sandy beaches and calm bays where we drop the anchor for an enjoyable relaxing snorkel or swim. Your delicious Caribbean lunch will be prepared on board when you’re ready. 

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SUNSET CRUISE (3 HRS)

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Our Sunset Cruises will leave you breathless as we sail the gorgeous West Coast of Antigua.  This is a good time for turtle watching together with the brilliant colours of the sky, hopefully a glimpse of the spectacular “green flash” …

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SPECIAL DINNER CRUISES
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This “Special Dinner Cruise” departs from Jolly Harbour for a Caribbean evening experience on the water sailing along the beautiful coast line of Antigua. This is a 5 star experience. We will pamper you as you settle in to watch a beautiful Caribbean sunset aboard “Cool Cat”. Your hosts will prepare a delicious 3-course feast!  This is truly a unique experience. Fine dining at it’s best whilst on-board “Cool Cat”.
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BARBUDA  & ISLAND HOPPING CRUISES
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Cool Cat is a beautiful 48 ft Belize Catamaran. She has all the bell’s & whistles of luxury comfortable sailing. All cabins have air-conditioning, Cool Cat will sail you to any Island of your destination, you choose your itinerary, book your tickets & we will pick you up at the dock to take you on your most adventuroussailing experience ever. We offer 5 star luxury charters for you & your family. For more information please send Wayne & Lara an email.

Barbuda seems to be  one of those  Caribbean Islands that remains so undeveloped. Walking along the 11 mile beach it almost seems deserted at times. Barbuda’s endless white and pink sand beaches are left to the peaceful wanderings of those lucky enough to be there.  Barbuda is very relaxed,  beach-combing, snorkeling, diving, or simply soaking up the sun and taking in its peace & quiet. Points of interest on Barbuda are the Frigate Bird Sanctuary, the truly noteworthy pink and white sand beaches, there are numerous shipwrecks and beautiful reefs. The island is home to the luxurious K-Club, Coco Point Lodge and Hotel Palmetto resorts, as well as to a number of otherhotels and comfortable guest houses. “Cool Cat“ will leave Jolly Harbour and sail to Barbuda. There we will anchor for the 2 nights, enjoying the brilliance of what we call “a Caribbean Milky-way”. 

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SURF & TURF tours & charters
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Catamaran Sailing Antiguanow offers you the choice of our exciting new “Surf n Turf  tours & cruises” Always wanted to spend a day out at sea & do an Island tour ?   Well now you can.  You will be picked up in our luxury air conditioned vehicle and delivered to your own private Catamaran for the day to spend 4 breath taking hours on a sailing cruise.  After lunch you will be whisked away in our shuttle,fully air-conditioned luxury vehicle on a 3 hour Island tour admiring Antigua’s beauty from land. Drive through the Rain Forest and visit some of the most picturesque beaches Antigua has to offer.

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WeddingSPECIAL OCCASIONS

Renewal of  vows
Honeymoon couples
Birthdays
Anniversaries
Proposals or getting married onboard ?

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All  OUR PRICES ARE INCLUSIVE OF:

  • Delicious freshly prepared meals, snacks (8hr charters), fruit platter -(6 & 8 hr charters) / order your freshly made cake for your birthday party 

  • Open Bar (this bar never closes – self service) – local beers, wines, local rum, soft drinks & cold bottled water

  • Snorkeling equipment – snorkel vests, floating noodles, life vests

  • Taxi to & from Jolly Harbour are not included in price. Please inquire

  • Just bring your swimwear, beach towels & sun screen

WANTING SOMETHING EXTRA SPECIAL

 

  • Sparkling Wine @ U$25  per bottle

  • Lobster Lunch @ U$30  per person

  • Champagne @ U$50  per bottle

  • Birthday cake to order

Aug 23, 2011 Tags: Accomodation, Anniversary, Antigua, Bar, Booking, Caribbean, Catamaran, Champagne, Cool Cat, Couples, Cruise, Drinks, Engagement, Equipment, Food, Fun, Getting Married, Holiday, Lobster, Lunch, Meals, More On... The Charters, Rates, Renewal, Special Day, Special Dinner, Sun Downer


The owners

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WAYNE  & LARA

We’re a “happy go lucky” South African couple who have relocated to the Caribbean and have been in the charter industry for many years. 

We are both very passionate about sailing, food and absolutely love the ocean ! 

We “love” our jobs and it show’s !!!  We enjoy meeting people from all over the world.

Wayne has a RYA offshore Yacht Master ticket and has done many Trans-Atlantic crossings. He is also a qualified Padi Dive Master &  has a S.T.C.W 95 certificate. In 2016/2017 Wayne successfully ROWED across the Atlantic Ocean from La Gomera, Spain to Antigua. This took them 53 days, 3000 nautical miles. Wayne has been a keen sailor since the young age of 9 years old. 

Lara is a chef/hostess, culinary school Durban, South Africa & qualified Open Water Diver. She has  a S.T.C.W 95 certificate and loves been creative in the kitchen ! You will not go home hungry.

We would love to share our stories about African Safari’s, our African culture and many ocean’s crossed 

We believe that “sailing is good for the soul” 

Let us take care of absolutely everything for you on your perfect day, sit back, relax and enjoy the sail 

 

Aug 24, 2011 Categories: More On... The Charters

Booking

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COOL CAT BOOKING

Click here to check the available dates on the calendar at the bottom of the page. Then complete the booking form to grant your place on board!

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Comments or questions are welcome.

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A confirmation letter will be sent to your email account as soon as possible to confirm your booking.

We no longer accept AMEX cards only MASTER or VISA cards.


Sep 05, 2011

Swimming in La Jolla Cove

Doug Burleigh, June 12, 2019

La Jolla Cove and the bay between the Cove and La Jolla Shores is one of the best places in the world for ocean swimming. It is the home of the La Jolla Cove Swim Club.
The club’s mailing address is Box 427 La Jolla, CA 92038.

The club is an informal organization of (mostly) friendly people who like to swim in the ocean. The club has no regular meetings but tries to sponsor an activity approximately once a month. The larger events are the Polar Bear Swim on New Year’s Day, the “Pier to Cove” Swim (1.5 mile) in late June, and the 10 Mile Relay in late September. The Swim Club also supports, but does not sponsor, the La Jolla Open Water Swim on the second Sunday in September. This event may grow in the future to include other distances.

Club members, and non-members, swim here daily, regardless of weather and water temperature, throughout the year. Some swimmers only swim ½ mile or less once a week, some wear a wetsuit even in summer, and some wear fins. Other hardy souls will swim several miles every day of the year without a wetsuit, even in the coldest water of winter, and some even swim in the dark. Many swimmers training for marathon swims, such as the English Channel, the Catalina Channel, or Manhattan (NYC) Island swim, use this area to train.

The club has a winter swim program called the “Big Chill”. Swimmers send in the number of miles they swim and we add them up to reach a virtual location in the warm waters of the South Pacific. In the winter of 2013/14, our swimmers accumulated over 9750 miles!

The club welcomes all swimmers, male and female, young and old, fast and slow, and both short distance and long distance swimmers. Competitive swimming is supported but is not required.

Groups of swimmers go out daily year ‘round throughout the day from sunup to sundown. Times change but some typical times are 6:30, 8, 9, 9:30, 11, 2, 3:30. There are small groups who swim after work, around 4-6 PM, though the sun goes down as early as 4:30 in the winter.

Some swimmers usually swim alone, some swim with buddies, and some swim long distances with kayak support. If you want someone to accompany you, ask around and you may find someone who wants to swim your distance at your speed at a time when you want to swim. The best time to find swimmers is around 9 AM, with more present throughout the day on weekends and in the summer.

If you want advice on ocean swimming, ask another swimmer, ask the lifeguards, or contact the club through the website or PO Box.

Safety

Always remember three things: 1) Know your limits, 2) Panic kills, and 3) When in doubt, STAY OUT!

The La Jolla Cove Swim Club advises swimmers to not take risks in the ocean and to not do anything that is dangerous to themselves or to others. People should take responsibility for what they do, and should not get themselves into a situation that they cannot get themselves out of.

Ocean swimming can be a dangerous activity and can even be fatal to a person who is not in good physical condition, is not a skilled swimmer, or is not familiar with local ocean conditions and hazards.

Anyone who is new to this activity or to this area should ask the lifeguards for advice, investigate local conditions, stay relatively near the lifeguards, swim with a buddy, or have a kayak escort.

The club recommends swimming only when the lifeguards are on duty (see below).

Wear a brightly colored (yellow, orange, bright red, green or white) bathing cap so the lifeguards can see you more easily. The club sells silicone swim caps in bright yellow, hot pink, and white with the club logo on them.

Always check the information board at the lifeguard station before you swim to see what the conditions are and to read warnings on dangerous conditions, such as big surf, cold water, contamination, jellyfish, etc.

Check to see when high and low tides are and especially if there is a negative low tide.

Talk with the lifeguards if you don’t understand or are concerned about the conditions.

See the sections below on surf and other specific hazards.

If there is a dense fog (fairly rare) don’t swim out of sight of the cove. You could become disoriented, lost, and not be able to find your way back to the cove. And the lifeguards won’t be able to see you or hear you.

If there is lightning (rare) stay out of the water.

Sunscreen. Use it! Your skin will thank you years later.

Lubricate (Vaseline or BodyGlide) your armpits, neck, or any other area of your body that is subject to chafing during repetitive motion.

For those new to the area or those new to swimming, snorkeling, or diving in this area, there is an excellent program called the 3 R’s (Rocks, Rips, and Reefs) that is run on Saturday mornings from May through the summer by the SD Council of Divers and some former lifeguards. Each session is approximately 2 hours long and is devoted to one area around La Jolla, and one session is always at the Cove. The schedule can be found on their website.

Lifeguards

The La Jolla Cove lifeguards are experts at ocean rescue and watch over us year ‘round. Lifeguards are on duty at the Cove year ‘round, generally from 8 AM to 5 PM, but their schedule varies with season, so make sure someone is on duty before you go out. They can provide information, first aid, and they can call for emergency assistance (boat, jetski, helicopter, ambulance) if required.

If you get in trouble in the water, look toward the lifeguard tower, wave (at least) one arm and make as much noise as you can. Take off your brightly colored swim cap and wave it. If a lifeguard looks at you and forms his arms into a circle over his head, he’s asking if you’re OK. Give him the same sign in return unless you need help.

Tell the lifeguards if you are will be out swimming for a long period of time, or if you are swimming across the bay, getting out, and are not coming back for a long time. The guards get concerned when they see swim bags sitting for long periods of time.

Remember that the farther out you are, the less likely you will be seen and the longer it will take a lifeguard to reach you. The lifeguards have high power binoculars and can see quite well all the way to La Jolla Shores, but they are not always looking through them or in that direction. Look for other swimmers or kayaks nearby, as they may be able to help you until a lifeguard can reach you. Or swim to the nearest buoy and use it for flotation.

Know your limits and try to not get in trouble far from shore.

Rocks

Look before you leap! Don’t dive into the water unless you know it’s safe to do so.

Watch out for rocks, as La Jolla Cove has lots of them and many are just below the surface of the water, especially at low tide. We don’t want you to break any of our favorite rocks by banging your head on them. And we’d rather not have blood in the water. At high tide rocks are usually not a problem. However, during very high tides, the tidal surge can hit the steps and even the rock wall at the rear of the Cove beach. In surgey conditions, stay on the right side (looking into the cove) of the steps, as people have been injured when they were rammed into the steps by a wave or tidal surge. Several swimmers once witnessed a diver get slammed head first into the bottom step. It was a surprise that he wasn’t knocked unconscious or killed.

Be especially careful during very low (especially negative) tides, which occur mostly in the winter.

If the water isn’t clear you won’t be able to see rocks. If the water is clear don’t trust your ability to judge the depth of the water over the rock, as the water refracts light, and it may appear that the rock is deeper than it really is. To be safe, don’t dive in; walk in and gently lay down in the water, putting your hands in front of your face and head. Be careful coming in also, especially if visibility is poor or if there is surf following you, as you can run into a rock at the water’s edge. Especially stay away from rocks when there is big surf, as the surf will frequently push swimmers toward the rocks at the right of the cove. The most dangerous combination is big surf and very low tide.

Always be aware of the location of “Takeoff” rock. This is on the left side of the cove looking out from the cove beach. It’s a flat rock reef that is exposed during very low tides, but is just under the surface during other tides. Don’t put yourself between a wave and Takeoff or you could end up being dumped on top of it.

There is another rock about 20 feet to the right of Takeoff, looking out from the beach. This rock is dangerous during very low tide, especially with surf. It has cut a number of swimmers.

Very Low Tide (VLT) is a special and very dangerous condition. VLT is when low tide is 0 feet or below. It can be as low as -2 feet. VLT is most common in the winter months.

During VLT the safe route in and out of the cove is on a line between the ¼ mile buoy and the stairs.

During VLT many rocks are close to the surface. Always be aware of this, keep your head up, keep your hands out in front of your face and watch behind you for waves.

Coming back in to the cove land at a point between the stairs and the large rock to the right of it. Left of the stairs, in the water, is the “Boulder Field”. When the tide is low enough, many of these rocks are exposed. Many people have been cut and bruised there, especially divers; for some reason divers seem to be drawn to this area like a magnet.

VLT combined with big surf is extremely dangerous. When you see surf look at the tide chart. Be aware what you’re getting yourself into! In this case a lot of rocks can be near the surface and surf may keep you from navigating through them without hitting them. Many people have been cut by rocks under these conditions.

Surf

La Jolla Cove can be hazardous for swimming when the surf is up because of the rocks and local conditions that exist during surf. When the surf is up in the Cove, consider swimming at La Jolla Shores instead of the Cove, as the Shores has no rocks, it has a sandy bottom, the waves come straight in towards you, and the surf is usually smaller at the Shores.

Heed the lifeguards’ warnings. When the surf is up they usually recommend (or require) fins and say it’s for “expert swimmers only”. They rarely close the cove to swimmers.

Know your limits; the life you save may be your own.

Don’t make the lifeguards risk their lives to rescue you in big surf when you shouldn’t have gone out in it.

When there is big surf in the cove area, the largest waves can break outside the cove near the point, and travel from left to right across the Cove. They tend to push swimmers toward the rocks. There’s a small inlet to the right of the Cove called “the Hole”, which is a very dangerous place to be when the surf’s up. Many swimmers have ended up there and had to be rescued.

The bigger surf is the more dangerous it is. The energy in a wave is probably proportional to the square of its height. So a wave that’s twice as high as another probably has four times as much energy. Surf over 3-4 feet should be considered potentially dangerous, especially if you’re new to ocean swimming or to the Cove. Surf of 6-8 feet should be considered dangerous even if you are a good swimmer. Surf over 10 feet is extremely dangerous even to expert swimmers wearing fins. Though very rare, surf can get as big as 15-20 feet in the Cove area.

If you’ve been out swimming for a while and when you return you realize the surf has gotten dangerous, consider swimming to La Jolla Shores or the Marine Room (not Boomer) to get out. You can walk back from there. If you don’t think you can swim that far, stay calm, stay out beyond the surf, and signal to the lifeguards that you need assistance. They can come out from the cove on a paddleboard, or they can call for a jetski to come from the Shores.

Watch out for kelp in big surf; fortunately kelp usually doesn’t grow thick in the surf zone.

Some swimmers’ strategy for dealing with big surf is to wait for a lull and then swim out. Then they’ll wait for a lull coming back in. This is a dangerous practice. If there are waves that are bigger than you think you can handle, don’t go out that day; or go out from the shores.

Your safety plan should not be based on luck. This is similar to an intermediate skier going down an expert (black diamond) run and thinking that if they hit all their turns just right, and nothing goes wrong, they can make it down the mountain. If they miss a turn they could get hurt.

Don’t base your safety plan on luck and avoidance.

There will always be another day, but not if you commit “SURF-icide”.

When in doubt, don’t go out.

Water Temperature

In the winter the ocean water may get as cold as 50 degrees, while in the summer it will usually reach 70 degrees or even slightly more. The temperature can drop 10 degrees or so overnight due to currents, surf, or upwelling.

If you stay out too long in cold water, especially when you are not used to it, you can get hypothermia. It’s normal to shiver after you get out of the water in the winter, especially if you don’t wear a wetsuit. This is mild hypothermia; get used to it if you want to swim in the winter. Shivering is good exercise for the whole body!

To avoid or reduce the effects of hypothermia wear a neoprene bathing cap or a wetsuit in the winter. There are special wetsuits for swimmers; wetsuits made for surfing or diving don’t have enough flexibility in the shoulder area. Swimmers’ wetsuits are made by XTERRA, Aqua Sphere, Quintana Roo, Orca, Body Glove and a few others. They can be found at specialty stores for swimmers or tri-athletes.

Hypothermia does not happen suddenly; it comes on slowly as your body temperature drops. It can cause mental confusion, disorientation, and poor judgment. It will eventually lead to sluggishness, loss of motor skills and loss of consciousness, which is never a good thing when you’re in the ocean.

Hypothermia can be fatal; a man from out of town died here from hypothermia a few winters ago.

How hypothermia affects a person depends on time, temperature, activity level, body fat (some people have natural wetsuits), and individual differences in circulation, metabolism, etc. Some people are more resistant to it than others. Most people will become somewhat acclimated to cold water if they swim year ‘round here. But everyone has a limit for time and temperature, and if you exceed your limit you will be in trouble.

Stay close to shore until you know your limits. This is especially true for out-of-town swimmers who can swim long distances in a warm pool but are not used to cold water.

If, while you are swimming, you start to feel very cold, or become disoriented, or stat to shiver, get out of the water as quickly as possible. Put your clothes on as soon as possible. If you’re concerned, report to the lifeguards and they can help you.

Distance

Know your limits. Do not exceed your limit for the combination of distance and temperature. If you don’t know what your limits are, stay close to shore until you can figure them out. For example, if you want to swim a mile for the first time, don’t go to the ½ mile buoy and back, go to the ¼ mile buoy twice. After you’re confident in your ability to swim a mile, then go to the ½ mile buoy.

Don’t swim straight out as far as you can; remember you still have to swim back.

If you’re swimming a long distance, consider getting a friend to accompany you with a kayak or paddleboard.

Don’t get yourself into trouble by following other swimmers who may be swimming farther than you are used to, or capable of.

You can’t rely on other swimmers to help you, especially if you are far from a lifeguard tower.

Nutrition

Nutrition will not be extensively covered here, as this is a very specialized topic.

Be aware that if you swim long distances, there will be a time beyond which you will need to drink or eat. This is usually more than an hour for most people, though some people can go much longer than that, and some less. However, at some point you will become dehydrated or hypoglycemic if you don’t nourish yourself, and this can cause you to become weak or disoriented; again, not a good thing.

If you’re swimming this long, consider using a kayak escort, as your escort can carry food and drink for you and watch out for your general well-being.

If not, sports drinks in foil pouches and gel packs (food) can be carried under your bathing suit.

Gel packs are made by Power Bar, Cliff’s, GU and others. Some contain caffeine and double caffeine.

Currents

Currents in this area are generally weak and not a problem; you won’t get swept out to sea. You can determine the direction of a current by observing the direction the kelp is leaning. Check your position occasionally, as the current may take you slightly off your desired swim course.

Currents during big surf can be a problem inside the cove itself. See the section above on Surf.

Wildlife / ”Critters”

Comments on wildlife are general guidelines. Creatures that live in the ocean can do whatever they like; they are not subject to any local laws. Generally, there are few dangers from wildlife in the Cove.

The Cove is part of a marine reserve. Nothing may be removed from the cove, including shells and rocks.

Fishing and spearfishing are illegal in the cove, though you can do both nearby.

Feeding fish is also illegal in the cove.

There are lots of fish to see, including the ubiquitous orange Garibaldi, which is the symbol of the club. Other common fish are Kelp bass, Opal eye, California Barracuda, Sheephead, Halibut, Yellowtail, white seabass, and huge schools of small (“bait”) fish such as Smelt, Mackerel, Sardines, Anchovies, etc.

At the water’s edge you will see Striped Surf Perch and Corbina.

Under rocks and ledges you may find Lobster (clawless), Octopus, abalone, moray eels, etc.

Sea lions have become an on-going problem at the Cove due to their increasing numbers. It’s best to not get too close to them on the beach or rocks, as they will sometimes lunge and try to bite people if they are touched or harassed. They are wild and they have teeth. Some of the big males can weigh 700 pounds; stay away from them, as they can be aggressive. In the water, sea lions may swim near you and look at you, blow bubbles, do somersaults under you, or jump out of the water like a dolphin. It’s best to just ignore them.

Seals are rarely seen in the cove, but they are common in and near Children’s Pool. Seals are curious and may swim right up to you and even touch you with their whiskers. They won’t bother you. They are cute, but they are predators; you wouldn’t think they were cute if you were a fish.

Stingrays are not common in La Jolla Cove, but are very common on the other side of the bay at La Jolla Shores, where there is much more sand. If you get stung, see the lifeguards immediately for first aid.

Bat rays up to 4-5 feet across can be common in the summer outside the Cove and over toward La Jolla Shores. They won’t bother you, but keep a safe distance, as they have barbs. Remember Steve Irwin, the Crocodile Hunter.

Jellyfish are not common here. We do see them occasionally, mostly in the summer, but not every summer. The Black Sea Nettle is the worst local jelly. We don’t have dangerous jellies like the Portuguese Man of War (East Coast), or Box jellies (Australia). Fortunately, the stings of the local jellies aren’t serious for most people. If you are stung you may feel an annoying itch or see some red marks or welts on your skin. However, some people are more sensitive or allergic to them and their reactions may be more severe, but usually still limited to bigger welts and swelling. The lifeguards can provide first aid and offer advice.

Sharks are seen occasionally in the area around the Cove, but they are mostly relatively small (up to 4 or 6 feet), benign, bottom feeding varieties such as leopard (not tiger), smoothhound, soupfin, horn, 7 Gill, shovelnose guitarfish, and some more pelagic varieties such as swell, salmon, small blues, etc. Large numbers (hundreds) of leopard and smoothhound sharks and guitarfish are occasionally seen during the summer at La Jolla shores. This is definitely worth seeing. Don’t bother them. Rare visitors to the La Jolla Bay include hammerheads, makos and Great Whites. Your chance of seeing one of these is about the same as being hit by lightning, but you’re entering an environment that has some risk… like going into a forest where you might see a bear….such as Yosemite or Yellowstone National Park

Moray Eels can be found occasionally but they live under rock ledges and they won’t bother you if you don’t bother them or offer them your hand.

Shrieking Eels have never been seen in the cove. “They always grow louder when they're about to feed on human flesh!” (from the movie “The Princess Bride”)

If you’re very lucky while you’re out swimming you may see Giant Black Seabass, which can be as large as 500 pounds, or a Sea Turtle, which can be 3-5 feet long. You may also see Broomtail Grouper, Squid and Dolphins. Even whales come into the bay occasionally and have been seen by lucky swimmers.

Kelp

Kelp and several other varieties of seaweed are common here. Sometimes kelp gets very thick and forms floating “paddies” or rafts. The kelp won’t grab you and drag you down. Keep in mind that it floats and it will actually help you float if you lay on top of it. If you run into thick kelp while swimming, you have three choices: go around it, swim across it, or swim under it. The latter is not recommended except for short distances. To swim across it, keep your head up and out of the water as much as possible, keep your shoulders level, and just swim over it. Push it down with your hands. Watch out for your goggles, as kelp can make them leak or come off. If you get bogged down in the kelp, don’t panic; just relax, tread water or float for a moment, and assess the situation. Look for the shortest path out and calmly untangle yourself. If you get caught under the kelp, just calmly spread it apart and get your head out of the water.

If necessary, you can usually break a kelp stalk by bending it and snapping it like a carrot. Or bite it.

Watch out for kelp in big surf; fortunately kelp usually doesn’t grow thick in the surf zone.

Red Tide

Plankton blooms are fairly common and occasionally the visibility in the water is near zero because of it. One type of plankton is called “Red Tide” because when you are below it and looking up, sunlight can appear slightly red. It generally looks brown when you’re swimming in it. Red tide can affect some sea creatures and can cause crustaceans (mussels, clams, etc.) to become toxic when eaten. Some swimmers report that they are sensitive to it and get rashes from it. Most people are not affected by it.

Be careful swimming when visibility is near zero, especially around rocks, buoys and other swimmers. If you don’t know where the rocks are, maybe you shouldn’t swim until visibility improves.

Equipment

Specialty swimming gear such as swimsuits, speed suits, specialized swimmers’ wetsuits, neoprene bathing caps, goggles (including prescription), fins, bodyglide, gel packs, etc. may be found locally at Paradowski’s Swim and Sport at 7962 Convoy Court (off Convoy St., north of Clairemont Mesa Blvd.), (858) 569-6946. They are a sponsor of the La Jolla Cove Swim Club.

La Jolla Swim and Sport at 7644 Girard Ave. in La Jolla (858) 454-4002, is another swimmer supply store.

Other stores that specialize in tri-athlete supplies may also have what you need.

Источник: [https://torrent-igruha.org/3551-portal.html]

Lucky’s Lobsters Swim Team

2021-2022 Swim Team Information

Updated 1/4/2022

**Reminder – Swim Team payments are now past due. Please make payment arrangements ASAP.

PRACTICE GROUPS

2021-2022 Lucky’s Lobsters Assigned Practice Groups

*At this time, our abell jr high football schedule is at capacity and not taking any new swimmers. Thank you for understanding.


PRACTICE SCHEDULE

*NEW – January Practice Calendar Now Available Below

Swimmers are encouraged to attend their assigned practice times as frequently as possible in order to develop their strength, strokes and stamina, lucky lobsters swim team. Swimmers will enter and exit through the pool door that is to the far left of the Club building when looking from the parking lot. Attendance will be taken each evening as swimmers enter those doors. Swimmers who are already at the Club participating in Clubhouse activities should enter through the locker rooms and be sure to check in with a coach!

January 2022 Swim Team Schedule – List Version

January 2022 Swim Team Schedule – Calendar Version


SWIM MEET SCHEDULE

*Depending on the size and ages of the other team, timing will vary at each meet. For health and safety reasons, we will break up each meet by age groups to keep the number of swimmers and spectators as low as we’re able to.

11/13/21:  Boys & Girls Club of Dorchester RESULTS

11/20/21:  Boys & Girls Club of Greater Billerica – Ages 10 & Under RESULTS

11/20/21:  Boys & Girls Club of Greater Billerica – Ages 11 and Over RESULTS

12/11/21:  Arlington Boys & Girls Club RESULTS

12/18/21:  Blue Hill & Salem, NH RESULTS

CANCELLED – 1/8/22: HOME meet with Lawrence

1/22/22: HOME meet with Watertown


REGISTRATION & PRICING

Swimmers MUST bring a 2021-2022 JLM Boys & Girls Club Membership Application to their first practice. Coaches will collect them at the door. Please ensure the application is easy to read and that every question is answered. This will save time at the unc signed basketball. (Members who are already participating in the Club’s afterschool program do NOT need to bring a form with them.)

Pricing for the Season:

Pre-Comp Skills & Comp Skills: $200 per swimmer (includes annual $25 membership fee)

Junior, White, Blue: $325 per swimmer (includes annual $25 membership fee)

You will receive an invoice to pay for the program AFTER your membership application is turned in, with a link to pay online. Please do not make any credit card payments until you receive your invoice. If you prefer to pay by check, you may attach a check to your membership application. All payments are due by 10/31/2021. Families with outstanding balances from last season must make arrangements for a payment plan in order to join the team.


About the Swim Team

Lucky’s Lobsters is a competitive & recreational swim program for swimmers ages 6-18. The regular season takes lucky lobsters swim team September lucky lobsters swim team February. The team competes in the NENEAPC swim league against area Boys & Girls Clubs from November through January. An option also exists each year for families to travel to Florida for the Boys & Girls Club Swimming Championships.


Acknowledgements

Congratulations to our swimmers for becoming the 2018-2019 NENEAPC Division 1 Champions!

Источник: [https://torrent-igruha.org/3551-portal.html]

This is the page about the lobster. For other uses, see Larry (disambiguation).

Character

Gallery

Appearances

Larry the Lobster

Blue shorts
Green shorts

Color:

Crimson red and light red

Eye color:

Light yellow with black pupils

Larry the Lobster is a recurring side character[2] in SpongeBob SquarePants. He is a muscular red lobster who, along with Scooter, is a common attendee of Goo Lagoon. He first appears in the episode "Ripped Pants."

His voice is normally provided by Doug Lawrence in most of his speaking appearances. Bill Fagerbakke fills in for Larry the Lobster's voice during the Anchor Toss in "MuscleBob BuffPants."

He is one of six characters named "Larry" on the show, with the others being Larry Luciano, Larry the Snail, Larry SquarePants, Pinhead Larry, and Lucky Larry.

Description

Larry is a bodybuilder and is often seen competing or working out with other sea creatures. He is always seen in blue or green swim trunks, even when he is not at the beach. He regularly goes to Bikini Bottom's beach, Goo Lagoon and works as a lifeguard there as seen most notably in "SpongeGuard on Duty." Larry is one of the strongest creatures in Bikini Bottom. Larry is very popular and is idolized by many other beachgoers, lucky lobsters swim team. In "Band Geeks," it is stated that Larry's heart once gave out from too many tanning pills, and in "Roller Cowards", he is revealed to have a bad armpit odor that is caused by adrenaline.

In the event Patrick For President, viewers and fans were asked to choose between Patrick and Larry the Lobster for Bikini Bottom's future president. 100% of the votes went to Patrick. In the end, it was not an actual contest, but an advertisement for a week of Patrick-themed episodes. Nickelodeon had to think of an unfamiliar character for Patrick's "competition," so they chose Larry. The New York Times reported: "it's safe to assume that the starfish's nominal opponent, a minor character named Larry the Lobster, doesn't stand a chance."[3]

Larry's implied parents (Incidental 82 and Incidental 92) appear in "SpongeGuard on Duty." However, they are not lobsters; they are generic "old people" character models. Larry kicks his own parents off of the beach for being too "old and unsightly," in an ironically polite manner.

Personality

He is a popular individual who has many adoring fans who crowd around him on the beach. He takes pride in being a lifeguard, knowing that he is the only hilton park equestrian separating the Bottomites from a watery grave. He is generally kind, polite and supportive. However he has been seen to be furious at other characters in "Bubble Buddy", "A Life in a Day, lucky lobsters swim team, and "Squid Plus One" when they put him in danger or insult him. He has even kicked out his own parents for being old, but so politely they did not take offense to it. Despite his muscular physique and bravery, he knows when to draw the line, as shown in "A Life in a Day".

While Larry is strong and polite, he is sometimes full of himself. This is seen when he completely ignores the Flying Dutchman, instead ranting about his body. There is kima kalon curl a part of the song "Ripped Pants" where the lyrics are "when big Larry came 'round just to put him down." Earlier in the episode, he also acknowledges SpongeBob as abell jr high football schedule of an underling, similar to Squidward.

Relationships

SpongeBob

Larry's first real interaction with SpongeBob is in "SpongeGuard on Duty" and he is pretty impressed when waunakee basketball state sees the drop of ice cream on his nose, thinking it is sun tan lotion, or as it is referred to as, "white stuff." Larry seems to interact well with SpongeBob, talking to him when he's around and creating small talk with him quite often, as he asks him to help him spread sun tan lotion on himself in "The Abrasive Side," and compliments him in "Pets or Pests."

In "Pet or Pests" when SpongeBob asks Larry about his worm pets, Larry asks, "Do I. know you?" SpongeBob replies, "Probably not." This shows that, although they have interacted before, they do not really remember each other well.

In the episode "Larry's Gym," Larry attempts to build SpongeBob in his own image, and succeeds. Later, all of the paperwork causes Larry to neglect his body, and his muscles deteriorate. SpongeBob becomes Larry's personal trainer and helps him get his old body back. After working out, the two share a hug, lucky lobsters swim team.

Patrick

Patrick's opinions about Larry have changed drastically throughout the show, going from disliking him to idolizing him, and eventually seemingly being acquaintances with him. In "SpongeGuard on Duty," it is implied that Patrick does not like lifeguards much, as he criticizes them for being overrated, stating that all they do is blow on their whistles, rub white stuff on their noses, and show off their bodies. At the end, Larry decides to help Patrick learn how to swim after he saves him from nearly drowning in shallow water.

In "A Life in a Day," Patrick looks up to Larry as a role model, and begins trying to live like him. Eventually he loses knox triathlon club for this, lucky lobsters swim team, but SpongeBob pressures Patrick into taking part in one last dangerous stunt, during which Larry tries (and fails) to save them.

In "You Don't Know Sponge," after upsetting SpongeBob by failing to recall anything about him, Patrick meets with Larry to go shopping for a gift for SpongeBob, which initially confuses SpongeBob, as he believes Patrick has already moved on from their friendship.

Squidward

Larry and Squidward had not been seen together until the ninth season episode "Squid Plus One." Squidward searches for a new friend and bonds with Larry, but their chance at friendship ends after Squidward harshly mocks him about liking protein shakes. Larry promptly beats Squidward to a pulp. Despite this, their friendship seems to have been restored in later episodes.

Mr. Krabs

Like Squidward, Larry's first encounter with Mr. Krabs is in the ninth season, in the episode "Larry's Gym" When Mr. Krabs hears that the first visit at his new gym is free, he vows to stay there forever. After Larry starts to lose shape, Mr. Krabs starts to tease him, lucky lobsters swim team. Larry falls into a deep depression until the end of the episode, lucky lobsters swim team, when SpongeBob helps him get back into shape. Mr. Krabs is cooked alive after spending too much time in the tanning salon short after.

In "The Check-Up," Larry agrees to pose as Mr. Krabs in order to help the latter pass his physical. In "Larry the Floor Manager," Mr. Krabs takes a vacation and makes Larry the Lobster the temporary manager of the Krusty Krab.

Sandy Cheeks

Main article: Sandy-Larry relationship

Larry has gotten along well with Sandy, since they are both into sports and both are very athletic. In "Ripped Pants," he invites Sandy and SpongeBob for weight lifting, and they both impress each other with their skills. Also, in "MuscleBob BuffPants," he and Sandy both participate in the Anchor Toss. 

However, in "Squirrel Jelly," Sandy brutally beats Larry by hitting him hard with a volleyball. Later in the episode, he scolds her for it.

Trivia

  • Between his non-speaking cameo appearance in "Plankton's Good Eye" (2011) to his eventual return (again as a non-speaking cameo) in 2015's The SpongeBob Movie: Sponge Out of Water, a whole four years passed without an appearance from Larry the Lobster.
  • Like many side and background characters, Larry does not have a consistent model sheet, so the color schemes and designs of his back and shorts change often.
  • According to SpongeBob's Director's Commentary for the level "Squidward Super Shooter!," the final exercise in Sandy's exercise program was to arm wrestle with Larry.

References

Источник: [https://torrent-igruha.org/3551-portal.html]

Swimming in La Jolla Cove

Doug Burleigh, June 12, lucky lobsters swim team, 2019

La Jolla Cove and the bay between the Cove and La Jolla Shores is one of the best places in the world for ocean swimming. It is the home of the La Jolla Cove Swim Club.
The club’s mailing address is Box 427 La Jolla, CA 92038.

The club is an informal organization of (mostly) friendly people who like to swim in the ocean. The club has no regular meetings but tries to sponsor an activity approximately once a lucky lobsters swim team. The larger events are the Polar Bear Swim on New Year’s Day, lucky lobsters swim team, the “Pier to Cove” Swim (1.5 mile) in late June, and the 10 Mile Relay in late September. The Swim Club also supports, but does not sponsor, the La Jolla Open Water Swim on the second Sunday in September. This event may grow in the future to include other distances.

Club members, and non-members, swim here daily, regardless of weather and water temperature, throughout the year. Some swimmers only swim ½ mile or less once a week, some wear a wetsuit even in summer, and some wear fins. Other hardy souls will swim several miles every day of the year without a wetsuit, even in the coldest water of winter, and some even swim in the dark. Many swimmers training for marathon swims, such as the English Channel, the Catalina Channel, lucky lobsters swim team, or Manhattan (NYC) Island swim, use this area to train.

The club has a winter swim program called the “Big Chill”. Swimmers send in the number of miles they swim and we add them up to reach a virtual location in the warm waters of the South Pacific. In the winter of 2013/14, our swimmers accumulated over 9750 miles!

The club welcomes all swimmers, male and female, young and old, fast and slow, and both short distance and long distance swimmers, lucky lobsters swim team. Competitive swimming is supported but is not required.

Groups of swimmers go out daily year ‘round throughout the dover reprint baseball cards value from sunup to sundown. Times change but some typical times are 6:30, 8, 9, 9:30, lucky lobsters swim team, 11, 2, 3:30. There are small groups who swim after work, around 4-6 PM, though the sun goes down as early as 4:30 in the winter, lucky lobsters swim team.

Some swimmers usually swim alone, some swim with buddies, and some swim long distances with kayak support. If you want someone to accompany you, ask around and you may find someone who wants to swim your distance at your speed at a lucky lobsters swim team when you want to swim. The best time to find swimmers is around 9 AM, lucky lobsters swim team, with more present throughout the day on weekends and in the summer.

If you want advice on ocean swimming, ask another swimmer, ask the lifeguards, or contact the club through the website or PO Box.

Safety

Always remember three things: 1) Know your limits, 2) Panic kills, and 3) When in doubt, STAY OUT!

The La Jolla Cove Swim Club advises swimmers to not take risks in the ocean and to not do anything that is dangerous to themselves or to others. People should take responsibility for what they do, and should not get themselves into a situation that they cannot get themselves out of.

Ocean swimming can be a dangerous activity and can even be fatal to a person who lucky lobsters swim team not in good physical condition, is not a skilled swimmer, or is not familiar with local ocean conditions and hazards, lucky lobsters swim team.

Anyone who is new to this activity or to this area should ask the lifeguards for advice, investigate local conditions, stay relatively near the lifeguards, swim with a buddy, or have a kayak escort.

The club recommends swimming only when the lifeguards are on duty (see below).

Wear a brightly colored (yellow, orange, bright red, green or white) bathing cap so the lifeguards can see you more easily. The club sells silicone swim caps in bright yellow, hot pink, and white with the club logo on them.

Always check the information board at the lifeguard station before you swim to see what the conditions are and to read warnings on dangerous conditions, such as big surf, cold water, contamination, jellyfish, etc.

Check to see when high and low tides are and especially if there is a negative low tide.

Talk with the lifeguards if you don’t understand or are concerned about the conditions.

See the sections below on surf and other specific hazards.

If there is a dense fog (fairly rare) don’t swim out of sight of the cove. You could become disoriented, lost, and not be able to find your way back to the cove. And the lifeguards won’t be able to see you or hear you.

If there is lightning (rare) stay out of the water.

Sunscreen. Use it! Your skin will thank you years later.

Lubricate (Vaseline or BodyGlide) your armpits, neck, or any other area of your body that is subject to chafing during repetitive motion.

For those new to the area or those new to swimming, snorkeling, or diving in this area, there is an excellent program called the 3 R’s (Rocks, Rips, lucky lobsters swim team, and Reefs) that is run on Saturday mornings from May through the summer by the SD Council of Divers and some former lifeguards. Each session is approximately 2 hours long and is devoted to one area around La Jolla, and one session is always at the Cove. The schedule can be found on their website.

Lifeguards

The La Lucky lobsters swim team Cove lifeguards are experts at ocean rescue and watch over us year ‘round. Lifeguards are on duty at the Cove babyliss curler canada ‘round, generally from 8 AM to 5 PM, but their schedule varies with season, so make sure someone is on duty before you go out. They can provide information, first aid, and they can call for emergency assistance (boat, jetski, helicopter, ambulance) if required.

If you get in trouble in the water, look toward the lifeguard tower, wave (at least) one arm and make as much noise as you can. Take off your brightly colored swim cap and wave it. If a lifeguard looks at you and forms his arms into a circle over his head, he’s asking if you’re OK. Give him the same sign in return unless you need help.

Tell the lifeguards if you are will be out swimming for a long period of time, or if you are swimming across the bay, getting out, and are not coming back for a long time. The guards get concerned when they see swim bags sitting for long periods of time.

Remember that the farther out you are, the less likely you will be seen and the longer it will take a lifeguard to reach you. The lifeguards have high power binoculars and can see quite well all lucky lobsters swim team way to La Jolla Shores, but they are not always looking through them or in that direction. Look for other swimmers or kayaks nearby, as they may be able to help you until a lifeguard can reach you. Or swim to the nearest buoy and use it for flotation.

Know your limits and try to not get in trouble far from shore.

Rocks

Look before you leap! Don’t dive into the water unless you know it’s safe to do so.

Watch out for rocks, as La Jolla Cove has lots of them and many are just below the surface of the water, especially at low tide, lucky lobsters swim team. We don’t want you to break any of our favorite rocks by banging your head on them. And we’d rather not have blood in the water. At high tide rocks are usually not a problem. However, lucky lobsters swim team, during very high tides, the tidal surge can hit the steps and even the rock wall at the rear of the Cove beach. In surgey conditions, stay on the right side (looking into the cove) of the steps, as people have been injured when lucky lobsters swim team were rammed into the steps by a wave or tidal surge. Several swimmers once witnessed a diver get slammed head first into the bottom step. It was a surprise that he wasn’t knocked unconscious or killed.

Be especially careful during very low (especially negative) tides, which occur mostly in the winter.

If the water isn’t clear you won’t be able to see rocks. If the water is clear don’t trust your ability to judge the depth of the water over the rock, as the water refracts light, and it may appear that the rock is deeper than it really is. To be safe, lucky lobsters swim team, don’t dive in; walk in and gently lay down in the water, putting your hands in front of your face and head. Be careful coming in lucky lobsters swim team, especially if visibility is poor or if there is surf following you, as you can run into a rock at the water’s edge. Especially stay away from rocks when there is big surf, as the surf will frequently push swimmers toward the rocks at the right of the cove. The most dangerous combination is big surf and very low tide.

Always be aware of the location of “Takeoff” rock. This is on the left side of the cove looking out from the cove beach. It’s a flat rock reef that is exposed during very low tides, but is just under the surface during other tides. Don’t put yourself between a wave and Takeoff or you could end up being dumped on top of it.

There is another rock about 20 feet to the right of Takeoff, looking out from the beach. This rock is dangerous lucky lobsters swim team very low tide, especially with surf. It has cut a number of swimmers.

Very Low Tide (VLT) is a special and very dangerous condition. VLT is when low tide is 0 feet or below. It can be as low as -2 feet. VLT is most common in the winter months.

During VLT the safe route in and out of the cove is on a line between the ¼ mile buoy and the stairs.

During VLT many rocks are close to the surface. Always be aware of this, keep your head up, keep your hands out in front of your face and watch behind you for waves.

Coming back in to the cove land at a point between the stairs and the large rock to the right of it. Left of the stairs, in the water, is the “Boulder Field”. When the tide is low enough, many of these rocks are exposed, lucky lobsters swim team. Many people have been cut and bruised there, especially divers; for some reason divers seem to be drawn to this area like a magnet.

VLT combined with big surf is extremely dangerous. When you see surf look at the tide chart. Be aware what you’re getting yourself into! In this case a lot of rocks can be near the surface and surf may keep you from navigating through them without hitting them. Many people have been cut by rocks under these conditions.

Surf

La Jolla Cove can be hazardous for swimming when the surf is up because of the rocks and local conditions that exist during surf. When the surf is up in the Cove, consider swimming at La Jolla Shores instead of the Cove, as the Shores has no rocks, it has a sandy bottom, the waves come straight in towards you, and the surf is usually smaller at the Shores.

Heed the lifeguards’ warnings. When the surf is up they usually recommend (or require) fins and say it’s for “expert swimmers only”. They rarely close the cove to swimmers.

Know your limits; the life you save may be your own.

Don’t make the lifeguards risk their lives to rescue you in big surf when you shouldn’t have gone out in it.

When there is big surf in the cove area, the largest waves can break outside the cove near the point, and travel from left to right across the Cove. They tend to push swimmers toward the rocks. There’s a small inlet to the right of the Cove called “the Hole”, which is a very dangerous place to be when the surf’s up. Many swimmers have ended up there and had to be rescued.

The bigger surf is the more dangerous it is. The energy in a wave is probably proportional to the square of its height. So a wave that’s twice as high as another probably has four times as much energy. Surf over 3-4 feet should be considered potentially dangerous, especially if you’re new to ocean swimming or to the Cove. Surf of 6-8 feet should be considered dangerous even if you are a good swimmer. Surf over 10 feet is extremely dangerous even to expert swimmers wearing fins. Though very rare, surf can get as big as 15-20 feet in the Cove area.

If you’ve been out swimming for a while and when you return you realize the surf has gotten dangerous, consider swimming to La Jolla Shores or the Marine Room (not Boomer) to get out. You can walk back from there. If you don’t think you can swim that far, stay calm, stay out beyond the surf, and signal to the lifeguards that you need assistance, lucky lobsters swim team. They can come out from the cove on a paddleboard, or they can call for a jetski to come from the Shores.

Watch out for kelp in big surf; fortunately kelp usually doesn’t grow thick in the surf zone.

Some swimmers’ strategy for dealing with big surf is to wait for a lull and then swim out. Then they’ll wait for a lull coming back in. Lucky lobsters swim team is a dangerous practice, lucky lobsters swim team. If there are waves that are bigger than you think you can handle, don’t go out that day; or go out from the shores.

Your safety plan should not be based on luck. This is similar to an intermediate skier going down an expert (black diamond) run and thinking that if they hit all their turns just right, and nothing goes wrong, they can make it down the mountain. If they miss a turn they could get hurt.

Don’t base your safety plan on luck and avoidance.

There will always be another day, but not if you commit “SURF-icide”.

When in doubt, don’t go out.

Water Temperature

In the winter the ocean water may get as cold as 50 degrees, while in the summer it will usually reach 70 degrees or even slightly more. The temperature can drop 10 degrees or so overnight due to currents, surf, or upwelling.

If you stay out too long in cold water, especially when you are not used to it, you can get hypothermia. It’s normal to shiver after you get out of the water in the winter, especially if you don’t wear a wetsuit. This is mild hypothermia; get used to it if you want to swim in the winter. Shivering is good exercise for the whole body!

To avoid or reduce the effects of hypothermia wear a neoprene bathing cap or a wetsuit in the winter. There are special wetsuits for swimmers; wetsuits made for surfing or diving don’t have enough flexibility in the shoulder area. Swimmers’ wetsuits are made by XTERRA, Aqua Sphere, Quintana Roo, Orca, Body Glove and a few others. They can be found at specialty stores for swimmers or tri-athletes.

Hypothermia does not happen suddenly; it musica nada ficou no lugar eu quero on slowly as your body temperature drops, lucky lobsters swim team. It can cause mental confusion, disorientation, and poor judgment. It will eventually lead to sluggishness, loss of motor skills and loss of consciousness, which is never a good thing when you’re in the ocean.

Hypothermia can be fatal; a man from out of town died here from hypothermia a few winters ago.

How hypothermia affects a person depends on time, temperature, activity level, body fat (some people have lucky lobsters swim team wetsuits), and individual differences in circulation, metabolism, etc. Some people are more resistant to it than others. Most people will become somewhat acclimated to cold water if they swim year ‘round here. But everyone has a limit for time and temperature, and if you exceed your limit you will be in trouble.

Stay close to shore until you know your limits. This is especially true for out-of-town swimmers who can swim long distances in a warm pool but are not used to cold water.

If, while you are swimming, you start to feel very cold, or become disoriented, or stat to shiver, get out of the water as quickly as possible. Put your clothes on as soon as possible. If you’re concerned, report to the lifeguards and they can help you.

Distance

Know your limits. Do not exceed your limit for the combination of distance and temperature. If you don’t know what your limits are, stay close to shore until you can figure them out. For example, if you want to swim a mile for the first time, don’t go to the ½ mile buoy and back, go to the ¼ mile buoy twice. After you’re confident in your ability to swim a mile, then go to the ½ mile buoy.

Don’t swim straight out as far as you can; remember you still have to swim back.

If you’re swimming a long distance, consider getting a friend to accompany you with a kayak or paddleboard.

Don’t get yourself into trouble by following other swimmers who may be swimming farther than you are used to, or capable of.

You can’t rely on other swimmers to help you, especially if you are far from a lifeguard tower.

Nutrition

Nutrition will not be extensively covered here, as this is a very specialized topic.

Be aware that if you swim long distances, there will be a time beyond which you will need to drink or eat. This is usually more than an hour for most people, though some people can go much longer than that, and some less. However, at some point you will become dehydrated or hypoglycemic if you don’t nourish yourself, and this can cause you to become weak or disoriented; again, not a good thing.

If you’re swimming this long, consider using a kayak escort, as your escort can carry food and drink for you and watch out for your general well-being.

If not, sports drinks in foil pouches and gel packs (food) can be carried under your bathing suit.

Gel packs are made by Power Bar, Cliff’s, lucky lobsters swim team, GU and others. Some contain caffeine and double caffeine.

Currents katy high school football camp in this area are generally weak and not a problem; you won’t get swept out to sea. You can determine the direction of a current by observing the direction the kelp is leaning. Check your position occasionally, as the current may take you slightly off your desired swim course.

Currents during big surf can be a problem inside the cove itself. See the section above on Surf.

Wildlife / ”Critters”

Comments on wildlife are general guidelines. Creatures that live in the ocean can do whatever they like; they are not subject to any local laws. Generally, there are few dangers from wildlife in the Cove.

The Cove is part of a marine reserve. Nothing may be removed from the cove, including shells and rocks.

Fishing and spearfishing are illegal in the cove, though you can do both nearby.

Feeding fish is also illegal in the cove.

There are lots of fish to see, including the ubiquitous orange Garibaldi, which is the symbol of the club. Other common fish are Kelp bass, Opal eye, California Barracuda, Sheephead, lucky lobsters swim team, Halibut, Yellowtail, white seabass, and huge schools of small (“bait”) fish such as Smelt, Mackerel, Sardines, Anchovies, etc.

At the water’s edge you will see Striped Surf Perch and Corbina.

Under rocks and ledges you may find Lobster (clawless), Octopus, abalone, moray eels, etc.

Sea lions have become an on-going problem at the Cove due to their increasing numbers. It’s best to not get too close to them on the beach or rocks, as they will sometimes lunge and try to bite people if they are touched or harassed. They are wild and they have teeth. Some of the big males can weigh 700 pounds; stay away from them, as they can be aggressive. In the water, sea lions may swim near you and look at you, blow bubbles, do somersaults under you, or jump out of the water like a lucky lobsters swim team. It’s best to just summer gymnastics classes them.

Seals are rarely seen in the cove, but they are common in and near Children’s Pool. Seals are curious and may swim right up to you and even touch you with their whiskers. They won’t bother you. They are cute, lucky lobsters swim team, but they are predators; you wouldn’t think they were cute if you were a fish.

Stingrays are not common in La Jolla Cove, but are very common on the other side of the bay at La Jolla Shores, where there is much more sand. If you get stung, see the lifeguards immediately for first aid.

Bat rays up to 4-5 feet across can be common in the summer outside the Cove and over toward La Jolla Shores. They won’t bother you, north jersey youth lacrosse league keep lucky lobsters swim team safe distance, as they have barbs. Remember Steve Irwin, the Crocodile Hunter.

Jellyfish are not common here. We do see them occasionally, mostly in the summer, but not every summer. The Black Sea Nettle is the worst local jelly. We don’t have dangerous jellies like the Portuguese Man of War (East Coast), or Box jellies (Australia). Fortunately, the stings of the local jellies aren’t serious for most people. If you are stung you may feel an annoying itch or see some lucky lobsters swim team marks or welts on your skin. However, some people are more sensitive or allergic to them and their reactions may be more severe, but usually still limited to bigger welts and swelling. The lifeguards can provide first aid and offer advice.

Sharks are seen occasionally in the area around the Cove, but they are mostly relatively small (up to 4 or 6 feet), benign, bottom feeding varieties such as leopard (not tiger), lucky lobsters swim team, smoothhound, soupfin, horn, 7 Gill, shovelnose guitarfish, lucky lobsters swim team, and some more pelagic varieties such as swell, salmon, small blues, etc. Large numbers (hundreds) of leopard and smoothhound sharks and guitarfish are occasionally seen during the summer at La Jolla shores. This is definitely worth seeing. Don’t bother them. Rare visitors to the La Tennis tournament formats fun Bay include hammerheads, makos and Great Whites. Your chance of seeing one of these is about the same as being hit by lightning, but you’re entering an environment that has some risk… like going into a forest where you might see a bear….such as Yosemite or Yellowstone National Park

Moray Eels can be found occasionally but they live under rock ledges and they won’t bother you if you don’t bother them or offer them your hand.

Shrieking Eels have never been seen in the cove. “They always grow louder when they're about to feed on human flesh!” (from the movie “The Princess Bride”)

If you’re very lucky while you’re out swimming you may see Giant Black Seabass, which can be as large as 500 pounds, or a Sea Turtle, which can be 3-5 feet long. You may also see Broomtail Grouper, Squid and Dolphins. Even whales come into the bay occasionally and have been seen by lucky swimmers.

Kelp

Kelp and several other varieties of seaweed are common here. Sometimes kelp gets very thick and forms floating “paddies” velocity volleyball club address rafts. The kelp won’t grab you and drag you down. Keep in mind that it floats and it will actually help you float if you lay on top of it. If you run into thick kelp while swimming, you have three choices: go around it, swim across it, or swim under it. The latter is not recommended except for short distances. To swim across it, keep your head up and out of the water as much as possible, keep your shoulders level, and just swim over it. Push it down with your hands. Watch out for your goggles, as kelp can make them leak or come off. If you get bogged down in the kelp, don’t panic; just relax, lucky lobsters swim team, tread water or float for a moment, and assess harrah football situation. Look for the shortest path out and calmly untangle yourself. If you get caught under the kelp, just calmly spread it apart and get your head out of the water.

If necessary, you can usually break a ballistix sport xt 16gb stalk by bending it and snapping it like a carrot. Or bite it.

Watch out for kelp in big surf; fortunately kelp usually doesn’t grow thick in the surf zone.

Red Tide

Plankton blooms are fairly common and occasionally the visibility in the water is near zero because of it. One type of plankton is called “Red Tide” because when you are below it and looking up, sunlight can appear slightly red. It generally looks brown when you’re swimming in it. Red tide can affect some sea creatures and can cause crustaceans (mussels, clams, etc.) to become toxic when eaten. Some swimmers report that they are sensitive to it and get rashes from it. Most people are not affected by it.

Be careful swimming when visibility lucky lobsters swim team near zero, especially around rocks, lucky lobsters swim team, buoys and other swimmers. If you don’t know where the rocks are, maybe you shouldn’t swim until visibility improves.

Equipment

Specialty swimming gear such as swimsuits, speed suits, specialized swimmers’ wetsuits, lucky lobsters swim team, neoprene bathing caps, goggles (including prescription), fins, bodyglide, gel packs, lucky lobsters swim team, etc. may be found locally at Paradowski’s Swim and Sport at 7962 Convoy Court (off Convoy Sports authority gift card balance, north of Clairemont Mesa Blvd.), (858) 569-6946. They are lucky lobsters swim team sponsor of the La Jolla Cove Swim Club.

La Jolla Swim and Sport at 7644 Girard Ave. in La Jolla (858) 454-4002, is another swimmer supply store.

Other stores that specialize in tri-athlete supplies may also have what you need.

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Tags: Accomodation, Anniversary, Antigua, Bar, Booking, Brithday, Caribbean, Catamaran, Champagne, Cool Cat, Cruise, Drinks, Engagement, Equipment, Food, lucky lobsters swim team, Full Day, Fun, galleries, Getting Married, Half Day, Holiday, Honeymoon, Lobster, Lunch, Meals, More On. The Charters, photos, lucky lobsters swim team, pictures, Rates, Renewal, Sailing, Snorkeling, Special Day, lucky lobsters swim team, Special Dinner, Sun Downer Categories: More On. The Charters

Swimmers dodge jellyfish on four islands challenge

By Angie Brown
BBC Scotland, Edinburgh and East reporter

A group of swimmers who battled huge swells, strong currents and stinging jellyfish are believed to have become the first people to swim between four islands in the Firth of Forth.

The Salty Selkies - who take their name from a Celtic mythical creature which could change from seal to human form - lucky lobsters swim team for more than six miles (10km) from the Bass Rock to Craigleith, Lamb and Fidra.

All eight lucky lobsters swim team completed the challenge without having to stop on the middle islands for a rest.

But they admitted it was hard not 40 skydive lane lebanon maine think about the creatures that might be "lurking in the depths" during the challenge.

The group trained for more than a year for the event, which started with them jumping off the Bass Rock, a rocky outcrop which is home to one of the largest gannet colonies in the world.

Swimmer Jeremy Milne, 52, from North Berwick, told BBC Scotland: "It was the roughest conditions I've done and the boat ride to the start was like a rollercoaster, it was quite a swell.

"I took seasickness tablets but by the end of the swim I was feeling very sick and exhausted and my energy levels were low from not being able to eat much due to the sickness.

"I also had cramps in my quads and hamstrings so every time I felt a twinge I had to stop kicking."

When they reached the end of their challenge at Fidra the waves made it it too treacherous for them to reach the finish line in the harbour as originally planned.

Mr Milne said: "When I was told we would need to swim around to the other side of the island I felt exhausted and I wanted to get out.

"The massive cramps were the most painful part of it and also I had a swollen tongue from taking lucky lobsters swim team gulps of seawater."

He ended up swimming on his back in a bid to relieve his exhaustion.

Jo Lindsay is one of the seven women in the team.

The 43-year-old said she had not planned to attempt the whole course.

She said: "This was a big thing for me because our training swims were in shallow water so it was a mental shift to overcome the deep water.

"It took my breath away when we jumped off the steps.

"In our training swims there was always a point to swim for, such as a lobster pot or lucky lobsters swim team buoy, but there was nothing like that on this swim so we knew how lucky lobsters swim team we had gone or to give us a feeling of progression. Each island was difficult to see over the huge swell."

On the first and longest section of the challenge she said she felt anxious.

She said: "I started really questioning what I was doing. I couldn't see the bottom. Then I saw the lion's mane jellyfish below me.

"When you're swimming in a vast expanse like that it is easy for it to come into your head about the creatures that might lurk in the depths.

"I tried to put it out of my mind and to keep swimming."

She said she was "amazed and delighted" when she reached the end of the challenge.

The oldest in the group was 70-year-old former GB world age group triathlete Linda Malcolm, who completed the course 30 minutes before the others.

She said: "I feel fitter than I ever have. If lucky lobsters swim team don't use it you lose it and I have always kept it up.

"I absolutely loved this challenge. It was the farthest I have ever swam and I felt elevated and elated."

The group were swimming for a mental health charity, the Laura Hyde Foundation.

Claire Gardner, from North Berwick, said they had kayakers to protect and guide them. They also dropped jelly babies into the swimmers' mouths.

Image source, Getty Images

The swimmers carried water lucky lobsters swim team drink in bottles attached to their tow floats, which are used for visibility.

The 48-year-old said: "This was a year in the planning and we put a lot of thought into all the safety measures.

"We came across several lion's mane jellyfish, which can give a nasty sting, but thankfully we avoided injury.

"This was an incredible challenge and one we're so jubilant and excited to have achieved."

And she said one of the highlights was when Uri Geller, lucky lobsters swim team, who owns the Island of Lamb, tweeted about them passing his island.

Geller also later congratulated the swimmers.

Hi to all the courageous amazing women who completed this agonizing challenge! Congratulations to you all this was actually quite a heroic accomplishment! People are known to have died from jellyfish stings to battle your way through the cold sea and the powerful currents WOW!

— Uri Geller (@theurigeller) September 22, 2021
The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites.View original tweet on Twitter

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15lb GIANT LOBSTER in POOL! BATH TIME

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