Triathlon rain

triathlon rain

Learning how to prepare for a triathlon in the rain can help you have the best race possible regardless of weather. Just a bit of thought in your training. Just because it's raining doesn't mean you can't keep training. With advances in wicking technology and tech fabrics, today's endurance athlete has a ton of. Typically if rain only is present, we will attempt to start the event on time or possibly delay until visibility is determined at a safe level.

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Open Water Swimming In The Rain - Triathlon Training

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9 Tips for Training in the Rain

On the morning of the New York City Triathlon two years ago, I woke up ready. Over the past six months, I had followed my training plan, practiced transitions and figured out how to change a bike tire. Check, check and check. But when a dark cloud rolled ominously across the sky, I suddenly remembered the one thing that I had forgotten to do: Learn how to swim, bike, and run in the rain.

"To be truly ready for race day, it's important to practice in all types of conditions," said Melissa Mantak, a former pro triathlete and Denver-based coach who has worked with pro and Olympic athletes. So the next time it starts to drizzle, grab your sneakers (or goggles) and put the following rainy day training tips into action. Because even though you'll get soaked, preparation means your next race won't be a wash.

During a swim

Sight often. "Rain can make it tough to see in the open water," Mantak said. "So sight more frequently—every few strokes—to avoid drifting and stay on course." Raise your head slightly after each breath to check that you're heading toward a fixed mark, like a buoy or tree on the shoreline. For even more visibility, swap dark-colored goggles for a pair with clear or light-colored lenses.

Take quick breaths. Going for air in a downpour can mean a mouthful of water. To avoid that scenario, breathe to the side and tuck your face toward your armpit. "It creates a little protected area," Mantak said. "But you still need to grab as much air as fast as you can." Try exhaling as your mouth clears the surface, and then inhaling quickly and sharply before returning to your stroke.

Keep your cool. New conditions plus already-high nerves can bring on a full-on freak out. If you feel the panic rising, focus on counting your strokes and breathing steadily. Can't handle the choppy water? Instead of fighting the waves, try diving beneath the bigger ones to conserve your energy.

While on the bike

Give yourself room. Like a car, your bike takes longer to slow to a stop on slick surfaces. "Practice on an empty stretch of road to get a feel of how much earlier you need to start braking," Mantak said. Apply steady pressure to both brakes: A sudden stop to the front or back wheel can cause you to flip or skid out. For a better handle on things, Mantak suggests taking a handling class at your local bike shop.

Watch for rainbows. No, not that kind—keep your eyes on the road. Rain forces oil in the pavement to rise, creating shimmery and slippery rainbow-like patches on the road. "Also pay attention to manhole covers and painted street lines," said Ian Tsuji, a bike specialist at Metro Bicycles in New York City. Turning suddenly or stopping short on these slick spots can result in a wipeout, he said, so stay on the straight and steady when riding over them.

Call attention to yourself. Channel your inner Serena Williams, and break out your flashiest gear. Brightly colored clothing and LED lights help drivers spot you on the road. "Drivers usually aren't expecting bikers on rainy days," said Terra Castro, a triathlete who races on Team Luna Chix's pro team. "If it really starts coming down hard, consider riding indoors at a Spin class, on a stationary bike or on your indoor trainer." But if you chose to brave the elements, when you head indoors, be sure to wipe down your bike and apply lube to your bike chain to keep it from rusting.

While you run

Gear up. Slip on a hat, visor or light-colored glasses to shield your face and opt for wicking (not cotton) gear and lightweight sneakers. "Soggy shoes can add one to two pounds to every step you take," Mantak said. Headed out for a long run? Don't forget the Body Glide, because soggy clothes can cause chafing. And stash your iPod, money and other valuables in a Ziploc bag or other waterproof container.

Dry out. A drenched run also means soaked shoes. And padding around in damp shoes for the rest of the week is not a good look. "As soon as you get inside, stuff your sneakers with old newspapers or a towel," said Castro. They'll dry more quickly and retain their shape.

Stay upbeat. "When I raced for Team USA at the Duathlon World Championships in France, it was freezing and dumping rain," Castro said. "It was so windy and slippery that I wiped out twice on my bike." But she refused to get discouraged. "When the conditions are that gnarly on race day, you just have to smile, accept it and have fun," she said.

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As any experienced athlete knows, unfavorable racing scenarios, whether weather-related or not, can be mentally defeating and ego-deflating. Let’s face it. It’s unlikely that we will have perfect racing conditions at every race this year. Your physical readiness, however, does not vanish just because the weather conditions are not ideal, or some other surprise comes your way. Success starts with advanced planning.  

1. Scenario: Can you say "brrrrr?"

Why we worry

Water pulls heat away from the body 25 times faster than air, a pertinent fact for the swim portion of your triathlon. Cold temperatures require your respiratory system to work harder, and the muscles, ligaments, and joints may feel unusually tight. Additionally, your body requires extra energy to warm itself, and you'll lose more fluids (to humidify the air you breathe). Not only that, you may find the cold causes an increased appetite and reduced thirst. Lastly, being cold is a miserable feeling and can negatively affect your physical and mental performance.

Preparation toolbox

  • Prior to the swim, give yourself extra time to warm up on dry land with dynamic stretching, a jog, or by using stretch cords. You should feel your core temperature rise through your warm-up, so consider staying fully dressed in warm clothes and warming up indoors, if possible. 
  • Minimize the risk for a muscle cramp/spasm by easing into each leg of your triathlon more than normal—at least for the first minutes.
  • A well-fitting, comfortable wetsuit will help fight heat loss and offer insulation and buoyancy. It will also prevent the heart and muscles from having to work extra hard. 
  • The wind and air temperature will change throughout the day. A moisture-wicking base and easy-to-pocket items can save the day. Consider packing a tight-fitting outer shell or vest, arm warmers, light gloves, and a cycling cap/ear covering for extra warmth and stashing them in your jersey or at the transition area.   
  • In an IRONMAN race, consider packing a long-sleeved shirt, arm warmers, dry hat and gloves in your T2 or special needs bag to keep yourself dry as the temps drop after sunset.
  • To avoid bonking and dehydration set a timer to go off every 15 to 20 minutes to keep yourself on a consistent fueling and hydration schedule.   
  • Solid food may be more palatable and easier to digest in the cold than it is in hot conditions. Aim to finish a bottle of your electrolyte-plus-carbohydrate rich drink every hour, and keep your stomach satisfied with well-practiced, 50 to calorie solid food snack as needed. Think small bites taken more frequently (every 20 to 30 minutes).

2. Scenario: Gone with the wind

Why we worry

When it comes to equipment (i.e. your aero helmet, wheel depth choice, and hydration set up), it may be in your best interest to not focus so much on what’s fastest (or what the pros are using) but instead, use what you are most comfortable with.

Windy conditions also require a lot of energy and can be physically and mentally draining. Don’t stress or obsess about your times or paces, even if your race is famous for being a fast course. Your performance will all come down to pacing. An epic bike time is worth bragging about only if you can run strong afterward. Race the competition, not the clock, and never try to beat the wind.   

Preparation toolbox

  • There’s not much time to gain while swimming in choppy conditions, but a lot of energy to potentially lose. Conserve your energy on the swim—it’s simply a warm-up for a tough day ahead.  
  • Review wind conditions on race day morning so that you can anticipate shifts in the wind on the course. No matter the wind's direction, stay relaxed. Keep a steady cadence with a relaxed upper body by shifting your gears as needed and focusing on a smooth and efficient pedal stroke. 
  • If running on a flat course, be mindful that a strong wind can affect effort and form just like running on hills. Focus on holding good technique and pacing to conserve energy. 
  • Keep your fueling strategy super simple by relying on primarily liquid nutrition every 10 to 15 minutes. This will help you focus on your effort while meeting your hourly fluid, electrolyte and carbohydrate needs. 

Related Article: Heat Advice from Mark Allen

3. Scenario: Rain?! Ugh

Why we worry

"PR or ER" is not the mindset you want to be racing with here. If you want to have a great race, safety is going to come first. No matter your fitness level, it all comes down to skills and experience. Most of us will not feel comfortable taking risks in rainy conditions, so it’s normal to feel like you can't race at your planned intensity. But that doesn’t mean that all that training was for nothing. Although you may not notice the rain in the swim, be aware that your bike brakes are a lot less efficient in the rain, and you may be running in heavy, soaked shoes with increased potential to cause blisters.   

Preparation toolbox

  • Unless you ride on a leather saddle, there is no need to cover your seat if the rain starts overnight. However, you do need to consider your moving bike parts. If your bike gets wet overnight, lubricate your drive train in the transition area, or cover if allowed. 
  • Because your stopping distance is increased on wet roads, give yourself more than enough time to stop or turn, and feather your brakes to clear debris from the brake pad and rim.  
  • Be aware that newly laid tarmac, road paint, puddles, gravel, sand, and oil are hazards to a cyclist and require extreme caution. You'll need to be able to think quickly, and those with exceptional bike skills will be rewarded.
  • In the case of a dry run, keep your running shoes in a plastic Ziploc bag in T2, with a pair of fresh socks.  
  • Choose clear or rose sunglasses for better visibility in the rain and a visor or hat for the run.
  • Running in the rain may be fun at times but your form may be altered—especially on rolling courses, courses with off-road sections, or where debris has accumulated. As you begin to fatigue throughout the race, consider adjusting your effort and stride to keep a steady and controlled gait to avoid ankle, knee or hip injuries. 
  • Seek out the ideal opportunities to fuel (a break in the rain, at the top of a climb, or on flat road) so that your health and performance are not compromised.

4. Scenario: It's a new race

Why we worry

If you are racing an inaugural race, there will be no race reports, race results or forum discussions for tips or advice. 

Preparation toolbox

  • Remember that the race directors and crew will be learning just like you. 
  • You're more likely to have a good race if you realize ahead of time that something is probably going to go wrong. Remember that you have prepared your best, but you may need to adjust your plan.
  • Mindfulness mantra: "Everyone is learning."

5. Scenario: The course gets modified

Why we worry

It's tough to deal with last-minute changes, like a canceled swim or modified course, when you've been so diligently preparing and visualizing things a certain way. Control is comforting, change is not. 

Preparation toolbox

  • If possible, study the modified course ahead of time. If the course is modified at the last minute, remind yourself, again, that everyone is in the same boat. This should be validating, because everyone is mentally revising his or her race strategy.
  • Remind yourself that you can’t change the situation but you can choose how you respond. Don’t react out of stress, respond by adjusting your attitude and rising to the new challenge. Who said triathlon was easy, right?
  • Mindfulness mantra: "Respond, don’t react."

6. Scenario: The race is canceled

Why we worry

With months of training and resources invested, it’s not easy to accept a canceled race.

Preparation toolbox

  • It’s important to remind yourself that it is the main priority of every race director to keep the athletes safe. It’s never an easy situation for an athlete to handle, but often what keeps us safe is not what we want in the moment… and that’s OK.
  • Mindfulness mantra: "Where does this fit in the big picture?"

If you encounter any of these scenarios, remind yourself that you already have the skills to control situations that are out of your control. Adjust your expectations and plan accordingly. Accept that uncomfortable, unexpected, and unwanted things happen all the time in training and in life, but that doesn't have to stop us from living life. When we choose to focus on what's working well instead of what's not working (or what we wish could have happened), we can perform at a much higher level than we previously thought we could attain.

Marni Sumbal is a top age-group triathlete, coach, and nutritionist. Visit her website at casinoextra.fr Dr. Gloria Petruzzelli, Licensed Clinical Psychologist and Sport Psychologist at CSU and owner of Life With No Limits coaching.

Источник: [casinoextra.fr]

Triathlon Gear Must-Haves for Training in the Rain

Just because it's pouring rain doesn't mean you can't keep your training on track. With advances in wicking technology and tech fabrics, today's endurance athlete has a ton of choices when it comes to gear that keeps them dry and comfortable in the rain.

More:10 Ways to Gain Performance

Here, Brittany Olsen of Athlete's Lounge in Portland, shows you the hottest gear that'll keep you comfortable and performing your best—even in a downpour.

#1: Fenders for Your Bike

Bike fenders will greatly reduce the amount of rain splatter you get onto your bike, which is key to keeping you dry.

Getting them onto race bike can be hard, especially if the fenders are larger. That's why it can be advantageous to choose a set of fenders that are smaller in size, but still allow for water bottle storage.

Tip: Make a courtesy flap for your fenders. It's easy, just slice a water bottle into a ? piece and then bolt it on to an existing rear fender to protect your friends.

Athlete's Lounge Recommends:

  • SKS Raceblade Fender Set $

More:3 Steps to a Successful Tri Bike Fit

#2: Shoe Covers

The trick with riding in the rain is that there are holes drilled into the bottom of your shoes. This can lead to lots a rather uncomfortable cycling experience.

The best shoe covers, according to Athlete's Lounge, are made from neoprene—which use the same technology that wetsuits do. There's no way to avoid getting your feet wet, but at least they'll be warm with adequate shoe cover protection.

Note: They are heavier than normal booties, but well worth it if you plan to train in wet conditions.

Athlete's Lounge Recommends:

  • Shimano Pro Ventura Shoe Cover $

More:How to Boost Your Cycling Speed

#3: Gloves

Blame gravity. Because your hands are below you while you ride, often times the rain from your coat drips down into your hands. So having a percent waterproof pair of gloves won't necessarily keep you dry.

That's why Athlete's Lounge suggests you go with gloves made of neoprene. They are bit heavier, but will definitely keep you warm—the Glacier Cycling Glove was originally made for icefishing.

Tip: Put newspaper in gloves after working out in the rain. Gear will be quite dry by the next day

Athlete's Lounge Recommends:

  • Glacier Cycling Glove $

#4: Rain Cap

When it comes to head gear for your training, it isn't just about keeping you dry. It's also about keeping you comfortable.

You'll want something light and breathable, a rain cap that bottles in all your heat will make your rides unpleasant. (And your training will suffer.)

Athlete's Lounge Recommends:

More:How to Get a Better Bike Split

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The event is usually scheduled for the Saturday morning of WittFest, although there's no official connection between the two events, and the Witt Tri is not officially part of WittFest. In , the Witt Tri is scheduled for Saturday, April Here's a timeline of events leading up to the triathlon itself:

  • late January - Initial Registration Solicitation
  • Wed 18 Mar - One Month to go! T-Shirt Deadline Reminder
  • Fri 27 Mar - DEADLINE: T-shirt orders
    • Registration Deadline Reminder
  • Mon 6 Apr - DEADLINE: Registration
  • Sat 18 Apr - Wittenberg Triathlon

Event Day Timing

The HPERC should be open by a.m. and the lifeguards should open the pool shortly thereafter. Feel free to show up any time. But give yourself some time to set up your gear in the transition area, pick up shirts (if you ordered one) and route maps, and sign the required liability release form.

All participants (including all relay team members) must be on the pool deck by a.m. At that time we'll hold an event orientation meeting, after which we'll launch the first heat. We will probably have the first heat at a.m. and, if necessary, the second at a.m.

The lifeguards will lock up the pool area after the last swimmers are finished and the guards go off duty, probably by about a.m. So be sure that you have all of your gear out of the pool area by that time.

Rain Date

We have no rain date. With all of the other events at that time of year (Board of Directors' meeting, final exams, commencement, etc.) it would be nearly impossible to reschedule our event.

There are two weather features that are a substantial threat to safety: lightning (for the bike and run) and heavy rain (for the bike). If either of these materializes, we'll just cancel the whole event. We won't make that call until the morning of the event itself. Fortunately, we've had decent weather every year so far. Check the local weather forecast if you're anxious or just curious.

Источник: [casinoextra.fr]

Doing Triathlon In The Rain – UPDATED – A Complete Guide

Page Contents

Even though most of us love warm weather and dry conditions, sometimes you may be unlucky and have to complete a triathlon in the rain.

For some people, competing in wet doesn’t bother them at all. However, for some, competing in wet conditions can cause a lack of performance. So what can you do about wet conditions? Is there any way you can prepare yourself for doing a triathlon in the rain?

Doing Triathlon In The Rain – A Complete Guide

Since your more likely to compete in dry conditions, many people think there is no need to train for a triathlon in the rain. However, this is the wrong advice. It is important to familiarize yourself with different conditions that you may experience on race day. Knowing this, how do your prepare for such conditions?

The most crucial factor in preparing for such conditions is not to shy away from training during rainy days. However, don’t push the limits and head out in thunderstorms and lightning.

Training in drizzle or even a steady rain can help you get used to such conditions and learn to handle the bike correctly when the roads are wet.

During these wet training days, it is an important time to look at your nutrition strategy. This is because the temperature usually drops, and the body needs more energy to keep moving forward. So, knowing how and when to increase your nutrition intake will pay dividends when the rain starts falling.

Just like your nutrition, your gear and clothing will need some adjustments. If you know the weather is going to turn foul during an event it is wise to prepare before the start of the event. That could mean placing a lightweight jacket in transition or wearing a short sleeve tri suit rather than and sleeveless model. Either way, it is important to make sure you stay warm during the event and prepare accordingly.

During the event, you must pace yourself to the conditions. That means slowing down on the bike around corners and stay away from the slippery white lines. While you may just think you need to be careful on the bike, it’s not uncommon to see triathletes slipping out around a corner when running.

Triathlon Rain Jackets & Other Gears

Luckily when the weather turns bad there are many triathlon rain jackets and other gear suitable for wet conditions. However, if you are competing in a half or full ironman, you probably won’t be wearing a rain jacket. Luckily there are other clothing available on the market that can help keep you somewhat dry and warm. These include undershirts, Gilet’s (cycling vest), and arm warmers. All of these products can help keep your core temperature stable and help to fend off light rain.
Picking the right triathlon gear for the conditions requires some trial and error though, as you won’t want to remove and put on clothing constantly throughout the race. A good strategy is to include numerous types of clothing in your transition bag if you know the conditions will be wet. This will help you make changes to your gear based on the weather conditions.

Bike Racing In The Rain

Bike Racing In The Rain – What You Should Know?

One of the most dangerous aspects of cycling is the rain. There are certain tips you should follow when bike racing in the rain as well as training. These include:

– Slowing down around corners
– Not following riders too close
– Wear clear sunglasses or a cycling cap
– Stay warm by adding require clothing for the conditions
– If conditions are bad change tires.
– Don’t forget to hydrate

Speed is a key factor in stay safe on the bike in the rain, this means if your bike racing in the rain, give the cyclist in front of you a little more room than you would do in dry conditions. For triathlon, this is something you won’t need to think about unless you are competing in draft-legal events. The extra room you leave will give your brakes enough time to grip, as the wet conditions often affect braking performance.

Just like brakes, tires play a strong role in wet conditions. By dropping your tire pressure you will provide better contact to the road. However, if the conditions are really bad it is wise to change out tires to something suited more to the conditions.

Other things like sunglasses or a cycling cap can also benefit you in wet conditions. Both provide an excellent way of protecting your eyes from water spraying up from the road or from the rider in front of you.

To finish it off, don’t forget to hydrate properly. Remember just because the conditions are wet and most probably the temperature has dropped, it is still important to hydrate. Too many athletes forget to drink in such conditions and their performance suffers because of it.

Cycling training in the rain

Cycling Training In The Rain

Just like bike racing in the rain, training in wet weather should follow the same protocol. That means keeping more distance from riders in your group and decreasing your speed around corners.

Another important thing to consider when riding in the rain is white lines. White lines can often get slippery and dangerous when wet. So make sure not to make any sudden turns while crossing a white line on the road.

For the most part, people struggle with getting out training in the rain, but if you are wrapped up warm and finally out in the conditions, it makes life much easier. Just remember to play it safe and keep speed to a minimum, the last thing you want is to affect your training with a crash!

Источник: [casinoextra.fr]
triathlon rain

9 Tips for Training in the Rain

On the morning of the New York City Triathlon two years ago, I woke up ready, triathlon rain. Over the past six months, I had followed my training plan, practiced transitions and figured out how to change a bike tire. Check, check and check. But when a dark cloud rolled ominously across the sky, I suddenly remembered the one thing that I had forgotten to do: Learn how to swim, bike, and run in the rain.

"To be truly ready for race day, it's important to practice in all types of conditions," said Melissa Mantak, a former pro triathlete and Denver-based coach who has worked with pro and Olympic athletes. So the next time it starts to drizzle, grab your sneakers (or goggles) and put the following rainy day training tips into action. Because even though you'll get soaked, preparation means your next race won't be triathlon rain wash.

During a swim

Sight often. "Rain can make it batesburg leesville middle school football to see in the open water," Mantak said. "So sight more frequently—every few strokes—to avoid drifting and stay on course." Raise your head slightly after each breath to check that you're heading toward a fixed mark, like a buoy or tree on the shoreline. For even triathlon rain visibility, swap dark-colored goggles for a pair with clear or light-colored lenses, triathlon rain.

Take quick breaths. Going for air in a downpour can mean a mouthful of water. To avoid that scenario, breathe to the side and tuck your face toward your armpit. "It creates a little protected area," Mantak said. "But you still need to grab as much air as fast as you can." Try exhaling as your mouth clears the surface, and then inhaling quickly and sharply before returning to your stroke.

Keep your cool. New conditions plus already-high nerves can bring on a full-on freak out. Triathlon rain you feel the panic rising, focus on counting your strokes and breathing steadily. Can't handle the choppy water? Instead of fighting the waves, try diving beneath the bigger ones to conserve your energy.

While on the bike

Give yourself room. Like a car, your bike takes longer to slow to a triathlon rain on slick surfaces. "Practice on an empty stretch of road to get a feel of how much earlier you need to start braking," Mantak said. Apply steady pressure to both brakes: A sudden stop to the front or back wheel can cause you to flip or skid out. For a better handle on things, triathlon rain, Mantak suggests taking a handling class at your local bike shop.

Watch for rainbows. No, not that kind—keep your eyes on the road. Rain forces oil in the pavement to rise, creating shimmery and slippery rainbow-like patches on the road, triathlon rain. "Also pay attention to manhole covers and painted street lines," said Ian Tsuji, a bike specialist at Metro Bicycles in New York City. Turning suddenly or stopping short on these slick spots can result in a wipeout, he said, so stay on the straight and steady when riding over them.

Call attention to yourself. Channel your inner Serena Williams, and break out your flashiest gear. Brightly colored clothing and LED lights help drivers spot triathlon rain on the road. "Drivers usually aren't expecting bikers on rainy days," said Terra Castro, a triathlete who races on Team Luna Chix's pro team. "If it really starts coming down hard, consider riding indoors at a Spin class, on a stationary bike or on your indoor trainer." But if you chose to brave the elements, when you head indoors, be sure to wipe down your bike and apply lube to your bike chain to keep it from rusting.

While you run

Gear up. Slip on triathlon rain hat, visor or light-colored glasses to shield your face and opt for wicking (not cotton) gear and lightweight sneakers. "Soggy shoes can add one to two pounds to every step you take," Mantak said. Headed out for a triathlon rain run? Don't forget the Body Glide, because soggy clothes can cause chafing. And stash your iPod, money and other valuables in a Ziploc bag or other waterproof container.

Dry out. A drenched run also means soaked shoes. And padding around in damp shoes for the rest of the week is not a good look. "As soon as you triathlon rain inside, stuff your sneakers with old newspapers or a towel," said Castro. They'll dry more quickly and retain their shape.

Stay upbeat. "When I raced for Team USA at the Duathlon World Championships in France, it was freezing and dumping rain," Castro said. "It was so windy and slippery that I wiped out twice on my bike." But she refused to get discouraged. "When the conditions are that gnarly on race day, you just have to smile, accept it and have fun," she said.

Active logo Sign up for your next race.

espnW—Connecting young women to the sports they love and follow

Источник: [casinoextra.fr]

Is there a rain forecast triathlon rain the day of your big race?

Perhaps it’s in an area that sees a lot of rain in the season. Or maybe you’ve just been caught out before and not known how to deal with showers on race day.

Learning how to prepare for a triathlon in the rain can help you have the best race possible regardless of weather.

Just a bit of thought in your training and preparation work before race day can help you handle anything that comes your way on the day.

Whatever the triathlon rain, learning how best to handle a triathlon in the rain will definitely give you an advantage. Let’s get into it!

Do Your Training in the Rain

The best possible way to prepare is to train in the rain. This alone can give you a huge advantage.

It can be tempting to just stay in bed or head back indoors when raindrops begin to fall. But if you take advantage of this weather for training purposes, you’ll have a huge advantage over those who haven’t trained in these conditions.

Take note of how you feel in rainy weather. Do you get cold easily? How does your running gear handle the wet weather? This can give you some insight into possible changes that need to be made before you get to the race.

Training in the rain will also help you learn tricky skills, like how to slow down properly on your bike or swim efficiently in rainy weather.

Study the Weather Before the Race

By this, we mean learn about weather patterns in the area. Keep an eye on weather apps or channels for the area triathlon rain which your race will be.

It’s a good idea to check out weather patterns a few months in advance. Does it rain for days on end? Or triathlon rain rain showers seem to be short and sweet before clear skies come back?

You don’t triathlon rain to learn the ins and outs of the weather in too much detail. But it’s a great idea to get a bit of an idea of what to expect in the area on the day.

Definitely check out the weather forecast the day before the race. If you’ve been keeping an eye on it in the months prior, you should be able to get a bit of an idea of the conditions coming up the following day.

Plan Your Clothing Layers Carefully

Dressing too heavy can weigh you down and make you uncomfortable, triathlon rain. But dressing too light can leave you cold during your race.

The key is to layer. A warm base layer and lighter top layers is the best way to go. A rain jacket or windproof jacket would be a good top layer to protect you from the cold, while still being light and not hampering your movement.

Avoid Non-Breathable Jackets

Even if it’s cool, it will be easy to overheat if you’re wearing gear that isn’t breathable. Most sports apparel is designed to be breathable, but it may be worth testing a few or borrowing one or two from friends to get a feel for them.

Remember, exercise naturally raises the core body temperature. A less breathable jacket on the bike will be okay, as you’re moving less and you’ll have some wind resistance cooling you down.

But running requires full-body movements, and it can be super easy to get too warm if your jacket doesn’t wick away moisture and allow for good ventilation.

You don’t want to have to stop and remove your jacket and then risk getting too cold. Choose a triathlon rain, light jacket from the start!

Organize Your Transition Area Accordingly

They say the transition is the 4th triathlon rain of a triathlon, and it’s true that this is where things either come together well or fall apart!

Having a well-prepared transition area is key to both saving you time and making sure you stay warm and dry.

Keep an extra jacket (breathable and light, of course) in a safe, dry place so you can swap it out if you need to.

It’s also a good idea to have a dry pair of shoes for each leg. Not only will it help you feel more comfortable, but it has a positive mental effect too!

Keep Your Stuff in triathlon rain Waterproof Bag on Transitions

Speaking of keeping extra gear around during your transitions, it’s best to invest in a waterproof transition bag.

You’re only going to feel worse if you arrive at your transition area only to find that your spare gear is soaked through.

If you can, it might help triathlon rain store your stuff off the ground, for example, on a small stool. That way, your bag won’t be sitting in a puddle, even if it is waterproof.

This just helps your gear to stay dry and safe, so you can swap wet stuff out for dry, warm stuff if necessary.

Keep your shoes in a plastic bag and upside down, just in case water does get. This will stop water from pooling inside them and becoming a problem when you put them on later.

Consider Clear Lenses

Whether you’re running, triathlon rain, swimming, or cycling, we recommend wearing clear lenses on your glasses or goggles.

Lenses with a tint are excellent for bright, sunny conditions, but can obscure your vision in rainy, murky weather.

Clear lenses will allow you to see without obstruction. If you want more of a rain repellent effect, try something like RainX, triathlon rain, which will keep droplets off of your lenses.

Forget the Socks

Forgoing the socks can triathlon rain a huge help in wet weather. Socks tend to triathlon rain a little bogged down in rain, and leaving them behind can help your feet stay more comfortable on the road and the bike.

If you’ve never gone sockless before, please don’t try this for the first time on race day, triathlon rain. It’s best to train without socks so you get a good feel for it. Start gradually, because it can feel quite weird when you first begin.

Make sure that your shoes fit well without socks. You’ll most likely need to cinch down good and proper to get a comfortable lockdown. Your shoe needs to feel natural and comfortable, with no flopping around or unnecessary space.

You may find that you really don’t like running or riding without socks. That’s okay – it’s not for everyone! In the end, it’s up to you whether you keep the socks on or leave them off.

But we do advise at least practicing without socks for a while so that you can take them off in wet weather if necessary. It can make a big difference to your comfort and your race.

Know How to Ride in the Rain

Riding in the rain can be tricky. We advise getting out and training on the bike every time you wake up to a rainy day!

On wet roads, you should do your best to keep the bike as upright as possible. Leaning can cause the wheels to lose their grip, which means there’s a high risk for accidents.

Try to turn with your body, not the bike. It does require some practice, so again, it’s best to work on it before race day.

You’ll also need to get used to not braking hard, which can cause the same problems as above. Work the brakes subtly to slow down in advance, and be aware that you’ll need a longer distance to slow down than you would in dry weather.

Don’t Get Sick

Going through a race in the rain can take a bit of a toll on the body! To avoid catching a cold after the race, take a few of these preventative measures.

Get changed into dry clothing as soon as possible after the race. Keep some dry towels in your car or transition bag so you can dry down before changing. Make sure you’ve got warm clothing.

When you’re home, hop in a warm shower to ease those muscles and warm you up properly. If you have a bath at home, soaking in warm water with Epsom salts can do wonders for sore muscles.

A quick serving of fruit while you’re still at the venue will help to boost your blood glucose olympique de montreal soccer until you can get home. When you can, have a good, healthy post-race meal, consisting of a good mix of healthy carbs, fats, and protein to refuel triathlon rain body.

Don’t forget to hydrate even after the race is finished! Water and electrolyte drinks are good choices.

Take Care of Your Gear

Don’t forget to spend some time taking care of your gear after your race. Your bike triathlon rain likely to be your most expensive investment, so you should take care to get it dry as soon as possible after the race.

If you’re traveling with your bike, don’t put it into a bike cover while it’s still wet. This only creates a perfect environment for mold!

Wipe down all your gear with a dry towel or cloth after the race. This includes helmets, fitness trackers or smartwatches, and anything else that can be dried this way.

Store wet gear in waterproof bags so it doesn’t seep out and make everything else wet. Wash it as soon triathlon rain possible to triathlon rain mold and odor setting in!

It’s a Mental Game

This is possibly the toughest part triathlon rain a triathlon, whether it’s in the rain or not! You can gear up and be as prepared as possible, but in the end, it all comes down to your mental strength.

We highly advise “practicing” your mental strength as you would your physical activities. Meditation and practicing mindfulness are invaluable for an athlete.

It can be easy to feel down and psych yourself out when you’re running in less-than-ideal weather.

Practicing mental toughness and learning calming techniques can help immensely. You should train your mind as well as your body if you’re serious about triathlon rain [casinoextra.fr]

Weather

Weather History: Second Weekend in June

  • Race Day Water Temp – 73 degrees
  • Race Day Water Temp – 71 degrees
  • Race Day Water Temp – 69 degrees
  • Race Day Water Temp – 72 degrees
  • Race Day Water Temp – 76 degrees

Grand Rapids Triathlon Historical Weather

Weather Cancellation Policy

While we will make every effort to start and continue our event on race day at the scheduled time, the weather is unpredictable. The decision to delay or cancel an event is not made solely by the race directors. It is made in conjunction with Sheriff, Medical and local meteorologists.

Typically if rain only is present, we will attempt to start the event on time or possibly delay until visibility is determined at a safe level.

Lightning is perhaps the most common, and potentially dangerous, inclement weather condition. In the event of lightning, guidelines by the NCAA and NSSL (National Severe Storms Laboratory) will be followed. The NCAA and NSSL strongly recommend terminating activity when the lightning is visible.

If unsafe to begin or continue any event when lightning is present. Thus, triathlon rain, if lightning is visible the first step will be to delay the start of the event for 1 hour. If lightning is still present after 1 hour, we will delay for an additional hour and potentially reduce the longer distance events. Depending on the weather forecast, the event will be canceled as early after the 1-hour delay. If lightning strikes during the event, the event will be immediately canceled with no delays.

If the event is canceled due to inclement weather, triathlon rain, no refunds or deferrals on entry fees will be given. All prize money and unused food will be donated to charity.

Delays and cancellations will be announced over the PA, posted on our FB page and all race staff will be notified immediately to communicate with their volunteers, etc. If the event is canceled mid-day, vehicles will be dispatched to pick up athletes at aid stations and on the course and/or asked to seek nearby shelter.

Grand Rapids Triathlon Inclement Weather Policy
For information on what will happen in the event of inclement weather, triathlon rain, please review our Weather Policy (PDF).

Источник: [casinoextra.fr]

Triathlon Gear Must-Haves for Training in the Rain

Just because it's pouring rain doesn't mean you can't keep your training on track. With advances in wicking technology and tech fabrics, today's endurance athlete has a ton of choices when it comes to gear that keeps them dry and comfortable in the rain.

More:10 Ways to Gain Performance

Here, Brittany Olsen of Athlete's Lounge in Portland, triathlon rain, shows you the hottest gear that'll keep you comfortable and performing your best—even in a downpour.

#1: Fenders for Your Bike

Bike fenders will greatly reduce the amount of rain splatter you get onto your bike, which is key to keeping you triathlon rain them onto race bike can be hard, triathlon rain, especially if the fenders are larger. That's why it can be advantageous to triathlon rain a set of fenders that are smaller in size, but still allow for water bottle storage.

Tip: Make a courtesy flap for your fenders. It's easy, just slice a water bottle into a ? piece and then bolt it on to an existing rear fender to protect your friends.

Athlete's Lounge Recommends:

  • SKS Raceblade Fender Set $

More:3 Steps to a Successful Tri Bike Fit

#2: Shoe Covers

The trick with riding in the rain is that there are holes drilled into the bottom of your shoes. This can lead to lots a rather uncomfortable cycling experience.

The best shoe cyaa volleyball, according to Athlete's Lounge, are made from neoprene—which use the same technology that wetsuits do. There's no way to avoid getting your feet wet, but at least they'll be warm with adequate shoe cover protection.

Note: They are heavier than normal booties, but well worth it if you plan to train in wet conditions.

Athlete's Lounge Recommends:

  • Shimano Pro Ventura Shoe Cover $

More:How to Boost Your Cycling Speed

#3: Gloves

Blame gravity. Because your hands are below you while you ride, often times the rain from your coat drips down into your hands. So having a percent waterproof pair of gloves won't necessarily keep you dry.

That's why Athlete's Lounge suggests you go with gloves made of neoprene. They are bit heavier, but will definitely keep you warm—the Glacier Cycling Glove was originally made for icefishing.

Tip: Put newspaper in gloves after working out in the rain. Gear will be quite dry by the next day

Athlete's Lounge Recommends:

  • Glacier Cycling Glove $

#4: Rain Cap

When it comes to head gear for your training, it isn't just about keeping you dry. It's also about keeping you comfortable.

You'll want something light and breathable, a rain cap that bottles in all your heat will make your rides unpleasant. (And your training will suffer.)

Athlete's Lounge Recommends:

More:How to Get a Better Bike Split

Источник: [casinoextra.fr]

I typically avoid making my articles personal, but racing in challenging conditions for me was an advantage, triathlon rain, to the point of selecting races which historically included them. As a professional triathlete traveling the world, showing up at an event in Japan and giving up or compromising my performance because it was cold and raining was not an option. There was prize money, and possibly ranking or Olympic qualifying points at stake. When athletes showed up to transition and the start line with grimaces and chattering teeth, I showed up with a smirk, hat, and gloves. I made difficult conditions an advantage through training, planning, and mental preparation.

If you are investing in equipment, triathlon rain, travel, and entry fees, the last thing you want is a race where the conditions are not just less than ideal, but nasty, triathlon rain. During my career I encountered tropical storms, sleet, and extreme heat, and I felt prepared for each one.

Preparation Through Training

One method to prepare for these conditions is training in them. Coaches and athletes have trended towards extremely controlled conditions utilizing technology like Alter G treadmills, Wahoo Kickrs and wave less gutter systems. Although coaches can methodically train their athletes physiologically with these tools in controlled conditions, they don’t prepare an athlete for the challenges they may encounter during competition. In some challenging conditions athletes cannot maintain their stroke in rough water, corner on wet roads, or properly hydrate during a midday race run, triathlon rain. You will not encounter these conditions at every event, but it is an advantage for those who are prepared.

To train for skymax golf trolley review conditions athletes must get their bike dirty and ride in the rain, swim hockey goalie svg the waves or safely run in heat. Cycling tactics that should be tested during training are riding with lower tire pressure or testing different tire models in wet conditions. Perhaps using toe warmers with your racing shoes or riding without gloves to insure that handlebar tape provides the proper tcu baseball uniforms 2017 when wet during a race.

I competed in Olympic format races so transitions were the difference between the lead pack and the chase pack, I had to make sure that any added equipment did not add time or the time added made a significant difference. For example, longer style toe warmers are great in training, but in a cold or wet race with typical triathlon style cycling shoes you need to cut a half to a full inch off to access the strap. These are fine details developed and executed in training and not the morning of the race when you realize you cannot secure or slip your foot out of the shoes.

For swimming you can skip the open lanes and get in the lane with the most people, right in the churning wave filled middle of the pool. This will simulate triathlon rain conditions you often find in open water swimming. The run is probably the easiest to accommodate challenging conditions, but as easy as it to jump on the treadmill to avoid rain, cold or wind. Purposely mix in days outside to test hats and gloves, or determine which shoes hold the most water and become too loose or heavy.

My own training example was a winter in Colorado when I was determined to ride outside every day no matter what the conditions or the workout. Some days it meant a mountain bike and triathlon rain style warming packs in my booties to ride in a blizzard, but I did it. For some reason that early spring race with rain and cold on the other side of the globe became my top finish to start a World Cup season.

Bring the Right Equipment

The most common error I see competitors and my athletes make is not packing equipment for all race conditions. Thinking positively will not keep your hands warm like the proper gloves spin mop prodaja in a cold or rain soaked race. There are essentials that I propose for every travel race pack:

  • toe warmers
  • gloves
  • winter hat
  • visor/hat for the run
  • plastic shopping bags
  • arm warmers
  • knee or leg warmers
  • rain jacket
  • wetsuit

I have seen many athletes not pack a wetsuit for a race that never has water cold enough for a wetsuit swim, then the lake turns over the night before the race, triathlon rain. This phenomenon is caused by windy conditions when surface water is replaced by colder water from the beneath dropping the swim temperature sometimes 10 to 15 degrees. Athletes without wetsuits are left behind in the swim and too cold to be competitive on the bike. There may be limited access to last minute product vendors at the expo and many athletes will end up creating alternatives, renting or borrowing an unfamiliar wetsuit, or going without.

Today’s options in race suit materials and designs, permits athletes to take a warm weather and cold weather option. Triathlon rain, in cold weather you can plan your suit for the bike and run conditions because it will be covered by a wetsuit in the swim, triathlon rain, versus a non-wetsuit racing kit that provides the best swimming advantage. Triathlon rain warmers can provide a post transition option to add warmth on a cold bike by attaching them the bars or top tube and pulling them on safely, after securing your feet in the shoes and riding in a non-technical section of the course. Any equipment and use of that equipment should of course be tested and practiced in training prior to race day.

Proper equipment extends to post-race as well where it is essential to have dry clothing to start the recovery process. They are easy to pack, use a simple plastic bag from the grocery store, and will keep post-race essentials dry inside a transition bag or backpack. I would pack these items for every race in my travel bag, triathlon rain, eventually I had a pre-packed set of them, to guarantee I didn’t forget something in the pre-travel frenzy, triathlon rain. During those races with challenging conditions, triathlon rain, I was glad I dedicated the travel bag space to bad weather equipment then a second outfit option for the post-race party.

Be Mentally Prepared

Mental preparation is essential to success at every level of competition. Just as you must prepare mentally to address competitive environments, you must also prepare to apply mental strategies in challenging race conditions. Visualizing a turn on the bike course is a common example, but what happens on race day when there is a puddle in that corner? Some athletes fail to adjust their mental approach to these conditions. Training in challenging conditions will give you an alternative visual reference to approaching the corner with regards to braking, weight distribution as well as corner entry and exit locations.

Preparation in challenging conditions creates a huge mental advantage for those who have trained in them and has packed the proper equipment because they can focus on race tactics, course profiles and pre-race visualizations. Otherwise you can become distracted and distressed by the conditions, spending time and energy to obtain needed items or alter items to overcome the conditions, triathlon rain. This is especially important in triathlon where the impact on three different sports triathlon rain be addressed. The bike and transitions are three areas that require the most focus during a triathlon and that attention to details must be maintained despite shivering hands and cold feet. Confidence is an important mental component of racing and triathlon rain these situations triathlon rain I smiled in the transition amid the pouring rain, and my 60 inch longboard skateboard showed distress, I already had an edge.

When I consider some of my best finishes, they were frequently race under challenging conditions. My first FootLocker Cross Country National Championships qualification was in 4 to 6 inch puddles and my Tinley racing kit was caked in mud so heavily it had to be retired. I won the first Olympic format Pro Nationals in heat that raised the water temperature to over 90°F. The Olympic Trials saw many top contenders fail to finish in the midday Texas heat while I punched my ticket mobility scooter golf bag carrier Sydney. There was the World Cup Triathlon in Gamagori Japan, triathlon rain, normally considered a hot race historically, but one early spring it was toe warmers and sticky handlebar tape that allowed me to navigate the wet and cold bike section, leading the rush to transition and a best ever start to an international season.

As an athlete who was not gifted with the physical gifts or speed commonly attributed to top triathletes, I was able to create an advantage when challenging conditions made others rethink their race participation. By including challenging conditions in your training plan, preparing the proper equipment and strengthening your mental skills a challenging race will become a successful performance.

Источник: [casinoextra.fr]

Triathlon rain - can

Definitely drop your tire pressure, to what it depends on what you normally ride at and your body weight, but a good rule is to take your normal number and subtract psi It'll handle much better. Watch your line in any tight corners in the dry things are more forgiving, in the wet, good lines are rewarded more (or rather bad lines are paid for with skin, or time), in that you will need to slow down less to corner with a sound approach than with a sloppier line. You'll likely want to use something to prevent chaffing (unlike other suggestions, I would not use vaseline, it ruins clothing, you're better off with something like body glide something to layer like a vest might not be a bad idea, depending on temperature, because it can drop much faster if you're soaked.

I wouldn't worry about covering the bike, I would use a good quality dry lube (tends to have better staying power in the wet than a wetter lube). I would however slip the running shoes into a plastic grocery bag, to keep them dry in transition

Источник: [casinoextra.fr]

The event is usually scheduled for the Saturday morning of WittFest, although there's no official connection between the two events, and the Witt Tri is not officially part of WittFest. In , the Witt Tri is scheduled for Saturday, April Here's a timeline of events leading up to the triathlon itself:

  • late January - Initial Registration Solicitation
  • Wed 18 Mar - One Month to go! T-Shirt Deadline Reminder
  • Fri 27 Mar - DEADLINE: T-shirt orders
    • Registration Deadline Reminder
  • Mon 6 Apr - DEADLINE: Registration
  • Sat 18 Apr - Wittenberg Triathlon

Event Day Timing

The HPERC should be open by a.m. and the lifeguards should open the pool shortly thereafter. Feel free to show up any time. But give yourself some time to set up your gear in the transition area, pick up shirts (if you ordered one) and route maps, and sign the required liability release form.

All participants (including all relay team members) must be on the pool deck by a.m. At that time we'll hold an event orientation meeting, after which we'll launch the first heat. We will probably have the first heat at a.m. and, if necessary, the second at a.m.

The lifeguards will lock up the pool area after the last swimmers are finished and the guards go off duty, probably by about a.m. So be sure that you have all of your gear out of the pool area by that time.

Rain Date

We have no rain date. With all of the other events at that time of year (Board of Directors' meeting, final exams, commencement, etc.) it would be nearly impossible to reschedule our event.

There are two weather features that are a substantial threat to safety: lightning (for the bike and run) and heavy rain (for the bike). If either of these materializes, we'll just cancel the whole event. We won't make that call until the morning of the event itself. Fortunately, we've had decent weather every year so far. Check the local weather forecast if you're anxious or just curious.

Источник: [casinoextra.fr]

9 Tips for Training in the Rain

On the morning of the New York City Triathlon two years ago, I woke up ready. Over the past six months, I had followed my training plan, practiced transitions and figured out how to change a bike tire. Check, check and check. But when a dark cloud rolled ominously across the sky, I suddenly remembered the one thing that I had forgotten to do: Learn how to swim, bike, and run in the rain.

"To be truly ready for race day, it's important to practice in all types of conditions," said Melissa Mantak, a former pro triathlete and Denver-based coach who has worked with pro and Olympic athletes. So the next time it starts to drizzle, grab your sneakers (or goggles) and put the following rainy day training tips into action. Because even though you'll get soaked, preparation means your next race won't be a wash.

During a swim

Sight often. "Rain can make it tough to see in the open water," Mantak said. "So sight more frequently—every few strokes—to avoid drifting and stay on course." Raise your head slightly after each breath to check that you're heading toward a fixed mark, like a buoy or tree on the shoreline. For even more visibility, swap dark-colored goggles for a pair with clear or light-colored lenses.

Take quick breaths. Going for air in a downpour can mean a mouthful of water. To avoid that scenario, breathe to the side and tuck your face toward your armpit. "It creates a little protected area," Mantak said. "But you still need to grab as much air as fast as you can." Try exhaling as your mouth clears the surface, and then inhaling quickly and sharply before returning to your stroke.

Keep your cool. New conditions plus already-high nerves can bring on a full-on freak out. If you feel the panic rising, focus on counting your strokes and breathing steadily. Can't handle the choppy water? Instead of fighting the waves, try diving beneath the bigger ones to conserve your energy.

While on the bike

Give yourself room. Like a car, your bike takes longer to slow to a stop on slick surfaces. "Practice on an empty stretch of road to get a feel of how much earlier you need to start braking," Mantak said. Apply steady pressure to both brakes: A sudden stop to the front or back wheel can cause you to flip or skid out. For a better handle on things, Mantak suggests taking a handling class at your local bike shop.

Watch for rainbows. No, not that kind—keep your eyes on the road. Rain forces oil in the pavement to rise, creating shimmery and slippery rainbow-like patches on the road. "Also pay attention to manhole covers and painted street lines," said Ian Tsuji, a bike specialist at Metro Bicycles in New York City. Turning suddenly or stopping short on these slick spots can result in a wipeout, he said, so stay on the straight and steady when riding over them.

Call attention to yourself. Channel your inner Serena Williams, and break out your flashiest gear. Brightly colored clothing and LED lights help drivers spot you on the road. "Drivers usually aren't expecting bikers on rainy days," said Terra Castro, a triathlete who races on Team Luna Chix's pro team. "If it really starts coming down hard, consider riding indoors at a Spin class, on a stationary bike or on your indoor trainer." But if you chose to brave the elements, when you head indoors, be sure to wipe down your bike and apply lube to your bike chain to keep it from rusting.

While you run

Gear up. Slip on a hat, visor or light-colored glasses to shield your face and opt for wicking (not cotton) gear and lightweight sneakers. "Soggy shoes can add one to two pounds to every step you take," Mantak said. Headed out for a long run? Don't forget the Body Glide, because soggy clothes can cause chafing. And stash your iPod, money and other valuables in a Ziploc bag or other waterproof container.

Dry out. A drenched run also means soaked shoes. And padding around in damp shoes for the rest of the week is not a good look. "As soon as you get inside, stuff your sneakers with old newspapers or a towel," said Castro. They'll dry more quickly and retain their shape.

Stay upbeat. "When I raced for Team USA at the Duathlon World Championships in France, it was freezing and dumping rain," Castro said. "It was so windy and slippery that I wiped out twice on my bike." But she refused to get discouraged. "When the conditions are that gnarly on race day, you just have to smile, accept it and have fun," she said.

Active logo Sign up for your next race.

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Источник: [casinoextra.fr]

Weather

Weather History: Second Weekend in June

  • Race Day Water Temp – 73 degrees
  • Race Day Water Temp – 71 degrees
  • Race Day Water Temp – 69 degrees
  • Race Day Water Temp – 72 degrees
  • Race Day Water Temp – 76 degrees

Grand Rapids Triathlon Historical Weather

Weather Cancellation Policy

While we will make every effort to start and continue our event on race day at the scheduled time, the weather is unpredictable. The decision to delay or cancel an event is not made solely by the race directors. It is made in conjunction with Sheriff, Medical and local meteorologists.

Typically if rain only is present, we will attempt to start the event on time or possibly delay until visibility is determined at a safe level.

Lightning is perhaps the most common, and potentially dangerous, inclement weather condition. In the event of lightning, guidelines by the NCAA and NSSL (National Severe Storms Laboratory) will be followed. The NCAA and NSSL strongly recommend terminating activity when the lightning is visible.

If unsafe to begin or continue any event when lightning is present. Thus, if lightning is visible the first step will be to delay the start of the event for 1 hour. If lightning is still present after 1 hour, we will delay for an additional hour and potentially reduce the longer distance events. Depending on the weather forecast, the event will be canceled as early after the 1-hour delay. If lightning strikes during the event, the event will be immediately canceled with no delays.

If the event is canceled due to inclement weather, no refunds or deferrals on entry fees will be given. All prize money and unused food will be donated to charity.

Delays and cancellations will be announced over the PA, posted on our FB page and all race staff will be notified immediately to communicate with their volunteers, etc. If the event is canceled mid-day, vehicles will be dispatched to pick up athletes at aid stations and on the course and/or asked to seek nearby shelter.

Grand Rapids Triathlon Inclement Weather Policy
For information on what will happen in the event of inclement weather, please review our Weather Policy (PDF).

Источник: [casinoextra.fr]

I recently had an “opportunity” to race in the rain.  It was hardly my first time racing in rain, but it felt like it.  I always forget the finer points of a wet race, since most races are on nice, summer days and the only real concern is the heat, or sun, or wind.

After the race, I began thinking of all the things I had forgotten to do, or neglected to bring.  It spurred me to add to my pre-race checklist.  I thought it would make sense to share a few of the key learnings with you, in the event you have yet to race in wet weather or want to get better at racing in adverse conditions.  Ironically, the swim in the one event when you really don’t notice the rain – you are already wet, you are already getting water on your face, and a little rain really is not noticeable.  Rather, it is the bike, run, and the all-important transition setup where the rain can be a factor.  Here are a few things I would pass along to all of our reader to make you better at racing in rainy conditions.

Forget the Socks  

Try going sockless

If you race with socks, become proficient at racing without them.  Unless you are doing a very long race, socks really can be a liability.  What happens in a rainy race is that your socks either get wet in the transition, or they get soaked on the bike ride.  Running in spongy socks is not only uncomfortable, but it can be terrible for your feet.  Gradually begin running and cycling without socks occasionally.  You will either develop a preference to not use them at all, or you will at least be able to shed them in rainy conditions when they would serve no purpose whatsoever.

Bring Non-Tinted Eyewear

This goes for both the bike as well as the swim.  Having tinted goggles on the swim is great on a sunny day, but not so much on a rainy, overcast day.  More importantly, dark glasses on a bike ride in the rain can create eyestrain or even a safety hazard.  I found myself pulling my glasses up often in order to get a good look at the road ahead of me.  Going without glasses is not an option, though.  I did that in my first rainy race several years ago, and having raindrops pelt your eyes on a downhill is not at all pleasant.

Organize Your Transition Area Accordingly

Remember that when you are out on swim or the bike, racing your tail off in the rain, your transition gear is getting soaked.  There are some simple things you can do to be sure you don’t end up coming back to soaked shoes or other gear.

First, keep your shoes upside down.  By flipping your shoes over, you can avoid having your insoles fill with water, creating difficult bike or run conditions before you even begin.  Second, consider storing your shoes in your bag.  Yes, it will add a couple seconds to your transition time to unzip your bag and fish your shoes out, but you will more than make that up by running past all of the people who have sponges on their feet.  Third, consider bringing along a rainbreak – perhaps a simple plastic bag to keep some key gear in, or even a small umbrella (I have seen this, although I think the plastic bag route is simpler).

Lastly, keep in mind that the rain may come when you are in the water and not expecting it.  If there is any chance at all of rain during the course of the race, set your transition area up as if it will be pouring.  This way, you won’t be stung by a rain storm popping up when you are unable to get back to your transition spot and keep things dry.

Train in the Rain

Don’t shy away from running, biking, and even swimming on rainy days.  Don’t be silly and tempt thunderstorms and lightning, but training in a drizzle or even a steady rain can actually help you improve in those conditions.  It will also help you learn about your limits, such as how much to slow down on the bike (biking in the rain is definitely the biggest hazard) or how your gear holds up when wet.   Getting a few wet-weather workouts in will give you an automatic leg up against those who head inside at the first sing of drizzle.

Take Care of Your Gear

photo: casinoextra.fr

After training or racing in the rain, it is important that you spend some extra time on your gear once it is all done.  Your bike likely got quite wet.  Wipe it down, and apply a drop or two of oil to any joints or moving areas where you cannot completely dry out a spot.  This will help prevent corrosion that could result from the water.  In general, keeping your bike dry should be something you strive to do, whether the moisture is coming from rain, sweat, or anything else.

As for your helmet and shoes, allow them to dry in as natural a way as possible.  If the rain is gone, put them in the sun and let them air out.  If the rain is not going to end any time soon, help the drying process along by using a hair dryer on low heat.  The goal is not to get everything completely dry, but help the natural drying process along so your gear days in good shape.

Источник: [casinoextra.fr]

I typically avoid making my articles personal, but racing in challenging conditions for me was an advantage, to the point of selecting races which historically included them. As a professional triathlete traveling the world, showing up at an event in Japan and giving up or compromising my performance because it was cold and raining was not an option. There was prize money, and possibly ranking or Olympic qualifying points at stake. When athletes showed up to transition and the start line with grimaces and chattering teeth, I showed up with a smirk, hat, and gloves. I made difficult conditions an advantage through training, planning, and mental preparation.

If you are investing in equipment, travel, and entry fees, the last thing you want is a race where the conditions are not just less than ideal, but nasty. During my career I encountered tropical storms, sleet, and extreme heat, and I felt prepared for each one.

Preparation Through Training

One method to prepare for these conditions is training in them. Coaches and athletes have trended towards extremely controlled conditions utilizing technology like Alter G treadmills, Wahoo Kickrs and wave less gutter systems. Although coaches can methodically train their athletes physiologically with these tools in controlled conditions, they don’t prepare an athlete for the challenges they may encounter during competition. In some challenging conditions athletes cannot maintain their stroke in rough water, corner on wet roads, or properly hydrate during a midday race run. You will not encounter these conditions at every event, but it is an advantage for those who are prepared.

To train for these conditions athletes must get their bike dirty and ride in the rain, swim through the waves or safely run in heat. Cycling tactics that should be tested during training are riding with lower tire pressure or testing different tire models in wet conditions. Perhaps using toe warmers with your racing shoes or riding without gloves to insure that handlebar tape provides the proper grip when wet during a race.

I competed in Olympic format races so transitions were the difference between the lead pack and the chase pack, I had to make sure that any added equipment did not add time or the time added made a significant difference. For example, longer style toe warmers are great in training, but in a cold or wet race with typical triathlon style cycling shoes you need to cut a half to a full inch off to access the strap. These are fine details developed and executed in training and not the morning of the race when you realize you cannot secure or slip your foot out of the shoes.

For swimming you can skip the open lanes and get in the lane with the most people, right in the churning wave filled middle of the pool. This will simulate choppy conditions you often find in open water swimming. The run is probably the easiest to accommodate challenging conditions, but as easy as it to jump on the treadmill to avoid rain, cold or wind. Purposely mix in days outside to test hats and gloves, or determine which shoes hold the most water and become too loose or heavy.

My own training example was a winter in Colorado when I was determined to ride outside every day no matter what the conditions or the workout. Some days it meant a mountain bike and skiing style warming packs in my booties to ride in a blizzard, but I did it. For some reason that early spring race with rain and cold on the other side of the globe became my top finish to start a World Cup season.

Bring the Right Equipment

The most common error I see competitors and my athletes make is not packing equipment for all race conditions. Thinking positively will not keep your hands warm like the proper gloves will in a cold or rain soaked race. There are essentials that I propose for every travel race pack:

  • toe warmers
  • gloves
  • winter hat
  • visor/hat for the run
  • plastic shopping bags
  • arm warmers
  • knee or leg warmers
  • rain jacket
  • wetsuit

I have seen many athletes not pack a wetsuit for a race that never has water cold enough for a wetsuit swim, then the lake turns over the night before the race. This phenomenon is caused by windy conditions when surface water is replaced by colder water from the beneath dropping the swim temperature sometimes 10 to 15 degrees. Athletes without wetsuits are left behind in the swim and too cold to be competitive on the bike. There may be limited access to last minute product vendors at the expo and many athletes will end up creating alternatives, renting or borrowing an unfamiliar wetsuit, or going without.

Today’s options in race suit materials and designs, permits athletes to take a warm weather and cold weather option. Normally, in cold weather you can plan your suit for the bike and run conditions because it will be covered by a wetsuit in the swim, versus a non-wetsuit racing kit that provides the best swimming advantage. Arm warmers can provide a post transition option to add warmth on a cold bike by attaching them the bars or top tube and pulling them on safely, after securing your feet in the shoes and riding in a non-technical section of the course. Any equipment and use of that equipment should of course be tested and practiced in training prior to race day.

Proper equipment extends to post-race as well where it is essential to have dry clothing to start the recovery process. They are easy to pack, use a simple plastic bag from the grocery store, and will keep post-race essentials dry inside a transition bag or backpack. I would pack these items for every race in my travel bag, eventually I had a pre-packed set of them, to guarantee I didn’t forget something in the pre-travel frenzy. During those races with challenging conditions, I was glad I dedicated the travel bag space to bad weather equipment then a second outfit option for the post-race party.

Be Mentally Prepared

Mental preparation is essential to success at every level of competition. Just as you must prepare mentally to address competitive environments, you must also prepare to apply mental strategies in challenging race conditions. Visualizing a turn on the bike course is a common example, but what happens on race day when there is a puddle in that corner? Some athletes fail to adjust their mental approach to these conditions. Training in challenging conditions will give you an alternative visual reference to approaching the corner with regards to braking, weight distribution as well as corner entry and exit locations.

Preparation in challenging conditions creates a huge mental advantage for those who have trained in them and has packed the proper equipment because they can focus on race tactics, course profiles and pre-race visualizations. Otherwise you can become distracted and distressed by the conditions, spending time and energy to obtain needed items or alter items to overcome the conditions. This is especially important in triathlon where the impact on three different sports must be addressed. The bike and transitions are three areas that require the most focus during a triathlon and that attention to details must be maintained despite shivering hands and cold feet. Confidence is an important mental component of racing and in these situations where I smiled in the transition amid the pouring rain, and my opponents showed distress, I already had an edge.

When I consider some of my best finishes, they were frequently race under challenging conditions. My first FootLocker Cross Country National Championships qualification was in 4 to 6 inch puddles and my Tinley racing kit was caked in mud so heavily it had to be retired. I won the first Olympic format Pro Nationals in heat that raised the water temperature to over 90°F. The Olympic Trials saw many top contenders fail to finish in the midday Texas heat while I punched my ticket to Sydney. There was the World Cup Triathlon in Gamagori Japan, normally considered a hot race historically, but one early spring it was toe warmers and sticky handlebar tape that allowed me to navigate the wet and cold bike section, leading the rush to transition and a best ever start to an international season.

As an athlete who was not gifted with the physical gifts or speed commonly attributed to top triathletes, I was able to create an advantage when challenging conditions made others rethink their race participation. By including challenging conditions in your training plan, preparing the proper equipment and strengthening your mental skills a challenging race will become a successful performance.

Источник: [casinoextra.fr]

Is there a rain forecast for the day of your big race?

Perhaps it’s in an area that sees a lot of rain in the season. Or maybe you’ve just been caught out before and not known how to deal with showers on race day.

Learning how to prepare for a triathlon in the rain can help you have the best race possible regardless of weather.

Just a bit of thought in your training and preparation work before race day can help you handle anything that comes your way on the day.

Whatever the weather, learning how best to handle a triathlon in the rain will definitely give you an advantage. Let’s get into it!

Do Your Training in the Rain

The best possible way to prepare is to train in the rain. This alone can give you a huge advantage.

It can be tempting to just stay in bed or head back indoors when raindrops begin to fall. But if you take advantage of this weather for training purposes, you’ll have a huge advantage over those who haven’t trained in these conditions.

Take note of how you feel in rainy weather. Do you get cold easily? How does your running gear handle the wet weather? This can give you some insight into possible changes that need to be made before you get to the race.

Training in the rain will also help you learn tricky skills, like how to slow down properly on your bike or swim efficiently in rainy weather.

Study the Weather Before the Race

By this, we mean learn about weather patterns in the area. Keep an eye on weather apps or channels for the area in which your race will be.

It’s a good idea to check out weather patterns a few months in advance. Does it rain for days on end? Or do rain showers seem to be short and sweet before clear skies come back?

You don’t have to learn the ins and outs of the weather in too much detail. But it’s a great idea to get a bit of an idea of what to expect in the area on the day.

Definitely check out the weather forecast the day before the race. If you’ve been keeping an eye on it in the months prior, you should be able to get a bit of an idea of the conditions coming up the following day.

Plan Your Clothing Layers Carefully

Dressing too heavy can weigh you down and make you uncomfortable. But dressing too light can leave you cold during your race.

The key is to layer. A warm base layer and lighter top layers is the best way to go. A rain jacket or windproof jacket would be a good top layer to protect you from the cold, while still being light and not hampering your movement.

Avoid Non-Breathable Jackets

Even if it’s cool, it will be easy to overheat if you’re wearing gear that isn’t breathable. Most sports apparel is designed to be breathable, but it may be worth testing a few or borrowing one or two from friends to get a feel for them.

Remember, exercise naturally raises the core body temperature. A less breathable jacket on the bike will be okay, as you’re moving less and you’ll have some wind resistance cooling you down.

But running requires full-body movements, and it can be super easy to get too warm if your jacket doesn’t wick away moisture and allow for good ventilation.

You don’t want to have to stop and remove your jacket and then risk getting too cold. Choose a breathable, light jacket from the start!

Organize Your Transition Area Accordingly

They say the transition is the 4th leg of a triathlon, and it’s true that this is where things either come together well or fall apart!

Having a well-prepared transition area is key to both saving you time and making sure you stay warm and dry.

Keep an extra jacket (breathable and light, of course) in a safe, dry place so you can swap it out if you need to.

It’s also a good idea to have a dry pair of shoes for each leg. Not only will it help you feel more comfortable, but it has a positive mental effect too!

Keep Your Stuff in a Waterproof Bag on Transitions

Speaking of keeping extra gear around during your transitions, it’s best to invest in a waterproof transition bag.

You’re only going to feel worse if you arrive at your transition area only to find that your spare gear is soaked through.

If you can, it might help to store your stuff off the ground, for example, on a small stool. That way, your bag won’t be sitting in a puddle, even if it is waterproof.

This just helps your gear to stay dry and safe, so you can swap wet stuff out for dry, warm stuff if necessary.

Keep your shoes in a plastic bag and upside down, just in case water does get. This will stop water from pooling inside them and becoming a problem when you put them on later.

Consider Clear Lenses

Whether you’re running, swimming, or cycling, we recommend wearing clear lenses on your glasses or goggles.

Lenses with a tint are excellent for bright, sunny conditions, but can obscure your vision in rainy, murky weather.

Clear lenses will allow you to see without obstruction. If you want more of a rain repellent effect, try something like RainX, which will keep droplets off of your lenses.

Forget the Socks

Forgoing the socks can be a huge help in wet weather. Socks tend to get a little bogged down in rain, and leaving them behind can help your feet stay more comfortable on the road and the bike.

If you’ve never gone sockless before, please don’t try this for the first time on race day. It’s best to train without socks so you get a good feel for it. Start gradually, because it can feel quite weird when you first begin.

Make sure that your shoes fit well without socks. You’ll most likely need to cinch down good and proper to get a comfortable lockdown. Your shoe needs to feel natural and comfortable, with no flopping around or unnecessary space.

You may find that you really don’t like running or riding without socks. That’s okay – it’s not for everyone! In the end, it’s up to you whether you keep the socks on or leave them off.

But we do advise at least practicing without socks for a while so that you can take them off in wet weather if necessary. It can make a big difference to your comfort and your race.

Know How to Ride in the Rain

Riding in the rain can be tricky. We advise getting out and training on the bike every time you wake up to a rainy day!

On wet roads, you should do your best to keep the bike as upright as possible. Leaning can cause the wheels to lose their grip, which means there’s a high risk for accidents.

Try to turn with your body, not the bike. It does require some practice, so again, it’s best to work on it before race day.

You’ll also need to get used to not braking hard, which can cause the same problems as above. Work the brakes subtly to slow down in advance, and be aware that you’ll need a longer distance to slow down than you would in dry weather.

Don’t Get Sick

Going through a race in the rain can take a bit of a toll on the body! To avoid catching a cold after the race, take a few of these preventative measures.

Get changed into dry clothing as soon as possible after the race. Keep some dry towels in your car or transition bag so you can dry down before changing. Make sure you’ve got warm clothing.

When you’re home, hop in a warm shower to ease those muscles and warm you up properly. If you have a bath at home, soaking in warm water with Epsom salts can do wonders for sore muscles.

A quick serving of fruit while you’re still at the venue will help to boost your blood glucose levels until you can get home. When you can, have a good, healthy post-race meal, consisting of a good mix of healthy carbs, fats, and protein to refuel your body.

Don’t forget to hydrate even after the race is finished! Water and electrolyte drinks are good choices.

Take Care of Your Gear

Don’t forget to spend some time taking care of your gear after your race. Your bike is likely to be your most expensive investment, so you should take care to get it dry as soon as possible after the race.

If you’re traveling with your bike, don’t put it into a bike cover while it’s still wet. This only creates a perfect environment for mold!

Wipe down all your gear with a dry towel or cloth after the race. This includes helmets, fitness trackers or smartwatches, and anything else that can be dried this way.

Store wet gear in waterproof bags so it doesn’t seep out and make everything else wet. Wash it as soon as possible to avoid mold and odor setting in!

It’s a Mental Game

This is possibly the toughest part of a triathlon, whether it’s in the rain or not! You can gear up and be as prepared as possible, but in the end, it all comes down to your mental strength.

We highly advise “practicing” your mental strength as you would your physical activities. Meditation and practicing mindfulness are invaluable for an athlete.

It can be easy to feel down and psych yourself out when you’re running in less-than-ideal weather.

Practicing mental toughness and learning calming techniques can help immensely. You should train your mind as well as your body if you’re serious about triathlon!

Источник: [casinoextra.fr]

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