Ben davis golf pro

  • 28.06.2019
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ben davis golf pro

Designed by golf course architect Donald Ross, Rackham Golf Course is an 18 hole championship course layout to add to your list of metro Detroit golf. Born in Pensacola, Florida, Davis moved to Detroit in 1925 and graduated from Northern High School. He began his golf journey in 1936 by giving lessons at. That dream was born Errelon Ben Davis in 1912 in Pensacola, Fla. He was such a gifted golfer even in his youth that his family moved him and his.

Ben davis golf pro - think

Ben Davis

Feb. 19, 1912- April 9, 2013

Ben DavisGolf legend Ben Davis—Joe Louis’ one-time teacher and the first African American in the country to serve as head pro at a municipal course passed away at age 101. He was born Erellon Ben Davis in Pensacola, Fla., moved to Detroit in 1925 and graduated from Detroit Northern High.  In 1936, Davis began giving golf lessons at Pine Crest Driving Range in Ferndale, MI. In 1952, working for Rackham Golf Course in Huntington Woods, he became an icon and taught for more than 50 years.

 

Two years later, as the head pro at Rackham, he became the first African American to hold that position at a U.S. municipal course and the first African American member of the Michigan Section of the PGA (1966).  Davis and Louis — the Detroit heavyweight boxing legend — became friends, and for years Louis hosted an annual tournament for amateurs at Rackham. Davis also was an accomplished tournament player and won the 1974 Michigan PGA Seniors title. He was inducted into the Michigan Golf Hall of Fame in 1992.
In 2007, to mark his 95th birthday, Huntington Woods proclaimed his birthday as “Ben Davis Day” for being “instrumental in the desegregation of golf as a major sport in southeast Michigan.”  Coverage of Davis’ 99th and 100th birthday celebrations are chronicled in the African American Golfer’s Digest.

Bemonthecart_courtesy of the Davis family


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Источник: [https://torrent-igruha.org/3551-portal.html]

Joe Louis and other golf barrier-breakers called this Detroit muni home

By: Sean Zak

Rackham golf course

Detroit Golf Club, where Bryson DeChambeau won Sunday, is very nice. But just north of it is a golf course in the tiny town of Huntington Woods, where Detroit golf just feels a bit more comfortable: Rackham Golf Course.

Rackham has existed as Detroit’s beloved muni for nearly 100 years since Horace Rackham donated the land in the 1920s — and Donald Ross turned it into a golf course. On Thursday morning, the first tee balls were in play before 6 a.m. It’s beautiful when golf balls beat the sun, on either half of the day. By 8 a.m. the parking lot was nearly full. Such is the case at cherished munis, right?

Not always. Just two years ago, the fate of Rackham and two other Detroit munis were in serious question. As in other cities across the country, Detroit’s city council was unsure about the value and budget affiliated with the golf courses. What is a municipal golf course actually worth to the community? 

In this case, the course is worth much more than the ground on which it exists. Because in a sport that has not often lifted up all populations — and particularly minority populations — Rackham is one of the brightest lights in the history of African-American golf.

That piece of Rackham’s story starts with Ben Davis. Davis arrived at Rackham in 1952 and became the first African-American head pro at a municipal course in the country. He had been a Detroit citizen since 1925 and teaching the game since 1936. In Rackham he found a home he simply couldn’t find elsewhere in America, and one he’d keep for more than 50 years. As the first black member of the Michigan PGA, he lived to be 101 years old. These days, the Detroit Open bears his name.

Around the same time Davis arrived at Rackham, a world-famous boxer had become a barrier-breaking golfer. Joe Louis, who grew up in Detroit, caught the golf bug in the 1930s and made Rackham his golfing home. In 1952, he became the first black golfer to play in a PGA-sanctioned event, guilting the PGA into admission to the San Diego Open. (The president at the time, Horton Smith, maintained a “Caucasian-only” clause during his tenure. His name was removed from an award just last week.)

Throughout the 40s, Louis fought for black golfers, hosting the Joe Louis Open at Rackham as an opportunity for the best African-American players to compete. As was well-documented in the book African American Golfers During the Jim Crow Era, Louis wanted an event where black golfers had the same stage as white golfers. It was a genuine novelty at the time. 

“I think this tournament will prove conclusively to our white friends that we have some [Walter] Hagens and [Gene] Sarazens in our group,” Louis told the Baltimore Afro-American at the time.

Louis didn’t just compete in the event or use his name to attract others. He often paid the $1,000 entry fee for black golfers who couldn’t afford it on their own.

All of this is engrained in Rackham’s DNA. A small but vital strand in the DNA of American golf. 

Decades later, we have Karen Peek. Max Marcovitch profiled Peek’s importance to the public golf community in Detroit last year. She is the director of golf operations at Rackham and two other Detroit munis (Chandler Park and Rouge Park), and has been playing Rackham for more than five decades. Like Davis, she was a trailblazer — the first African-American member of the Michigan LPGA section. Another page in Rackham’s story moving the game forward for all.

Her job goes on in this most confusing year, a spring filled with opening, closing and opening again. But as with most affordable ($31) and playable (no water hazards!) courses during the pandemic, Rackham is packed these days. The pace in the morning is great, but it slows in the afternoon. That happens at courses people love.

This is part of our Muni Monday series, spotlighting stories from the world of city- and county-owned golf courses around the world. Got a muni story that needs telling? Send tips to Dylan Dethier or to munimondays@gmail.com and follow Muni Mondays on Instagram.

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Doc in the D

The weather is starting to change for the better these days, and all of us start thinking about getting outdoors.

When I think about getting outdoors, I think of golf. As you know from some prior blog posts, I do think of golf as a metaphor for many aspects of life and a window into our culture and society.

Ben Davis

Detroit Golf Legend Ben Davis

Golf also offers insights into how people respond to challenges and life events.

Just as real quality is what occurs when no one is looking, the self regulation of penalties in golf is an incredible reflection of character. If a person cheats at golf, what do you think they do in business or in other aspects of their life?

The reason for this post isn’t to convince you of the metaphysics or tangential aspects of a sport that has someone trying to hit a small ball into a cup; it is to pay tribute to a great golfer and even greater man, Ben Davis.

Mr. Davis recently passed on at the age of 101.

On May 9, he was memorialized by the naming of the street leading to Rackham Golf course in Huntington Woods. Forever, golfers will drive down Ben Davis Drive to play at a course that plays a significant role in Detroit history.

Rackham Golf Course, off the westbound I-696 service drive near the Detroit Zoo, opened in 1923 as a gift from the philanthropist Horace Rackham. Incorporated in the deed for the property, it was stipulated that the course would be open to anyone, of any color. Most golf courses in Detroit and in the Nation were restricted to African Americans and people of color. Rackham broke down this barrier .

It was only fitting that Mr. Davis, who learned the game as a caddie, became the first black person to be appointed as a head professional of a United States golf course.

People weave in and out of our lives, especially in medicine, and my relationship with Mr. Davis was just so.

The DetroitFree Press would have a free golf course clinic for beginners back in the 1960s and 1970s. My father thought it would be a good idea for me to learn golf, I think mainly because he knew my career as a baseball player was going to be limited by my inability to hit a curve ball.

So my mother took me to stand in line of about 50 teenagers and children, learning how to hold a golf club from a smiling and spry professional, Ben Davis. He took time to look at all of our grips. To this day, I remember his hands, moving mine on the club: “Hold it like a baby chick, young man.”  And, “Swing like you would dance.”

Lindsey Mason III, the current head pro at the New Rogell Golf course in Detroit learned the game from Mr. Davis. He was quoted in the Free Press saying, “He made a great impression on a lot of young people. If you messed up, he’s just say, ‘let’s move on to the next shot.’ ”

I learned to love the game, but the time constraints of a few other activities, like medical school and residency, put my game on hiatus.

After being on staff for a few years, I was advised to take up a hobby other than reading the New England Journal of Medicine, and thought about starting up to play golf again.

I bought some clubs at a discount store and tried to hit the ball again. As any of you who took up the game know, it is humbling even when you play well and frequently, but it is most humbling at the beginning or at a new beginning.

One afternoon, a patient named Ben Davis was on my schedule.

I walked into the clinic and immediately recognized the hands. Big hands for a man his size, soft, lithe. I asked him what he did for a living, and he confirmed to me who he was: “I help people find pleasure in playing golf.”

I told him about the Free Press clinic that I attended. In a soft voice and smiling face, he said, “Doctor, I think I remember you.” He made me believe he did. I told him about my struggles returning to the game, and he told me, “remember what I do.”

He saw me for a few lessons at the Rackham range, a small range with the lessons interrupted periodically by the train whistle from the zoo. When I told him I thought my clubs were a problem, too long and too hard to hit, he took my six iron and hit an elegant draw over the 150 yard marker. “Clubs seem OK to me Doc. Might be that swing.”

I had the privilege of seeing Mrs. Davis, as well as hearing the stories about their life together. How they met in a club, love at first sight, dancing together.

Golf is about history, and Mr. Davis told me about his history.

How he loved the game, but was told there was no future in it for people like you. What it was like to be excluded because of your color, judged by your skin not your talent. How you needed to hide your abilities from certain other pro’s and golfers to not “show them up.”

No bitterness, just facts.

He told me about the games he would play with the legendary boxer, Joe Louis, some of them away games for big money, where he didn’t have to hide his skills. Joe Louis called him “my pro” and many a game was won by Joe Louis’ pro. He, like Louis, was a legend.

Over the years, I lost touch with Mr. Davis, but thought about him recently when I missed a turn and got off the I-696 ramp by Rackham. Within a week, my assistant saw a column in the Free Press talking about the memorial.

So this summer when I walk outside, with the smell of cut grass and the warm sun on my face, I will think about Mr. Davis.

I hope you will too, even if you aren’t a golfer.

“Swing like you would dance. If you mess up, move on to the next shot.”

This entry was posted in Detroit and tagged Ben Davis, Golf and Medicine, Hospital CEO by Dr. John Popovich. Bookmark the permalink. Источник: [https://torrent-igruha.org/3551-portal.html]
Erellon Ben Davis was born February 19, 1912 in Pensacola, Florida to Ellis and Belle Davis. He was the youngest of five children; three brothers (Russell, William and Henry), and one sister (Beatrice) who all preceded him in death. He confessed to Christ at an early age. In June of 1953 he was joined in holy matrimony to Ruby Nell Day. They were inseparable for the next 57 years until she preceded him in death in 2010.

Ben moved to Detroit in 1925 and graduated from Northern High School in Detroit. He began his professional golf career in 1936 at the Pine Crest Driving Range in Ferndale, Michigan. He began teaching golf at Rackham Golf Course, in Huntington Woods, Michigan in 1952 where he would become a Class A Head Professional.

Ben taught golf at Rackham for over 50 years. He was also the Head Pro at Palmer Park Golf Course in Detroit for a number of years. In 1968, he was the first African-American Head Golf Pro at a municipal golf course in the country. Although he began teaching golf in Michigan in 1936, it would be 30 years before he would break the color line of the Michigan PGA.

Ben held the course record at Rackham for eight years. He became the first African American admitted to the Michigan PGA in 1966. He won the Michigan Senior PGA Championship in 1974 and the U.S. National Senior Tournament in 1979 in Las Vegas. He was inducted into the Michigan Golf Hall of Fame in 1992. The Ben Davis Youth Golf Tournament was established in 2000 by the Detroit Recreation Department. In 2012, he was inducted into the African American Golfers Hall of Fame. Over his expansive career his many students included boxing legend Joe Louis and Detroit Piston’s Hall of Famer Bob Lanier.

Ben leaves behind a host of nieces and nephews, friends, and other family members.

The family would like to thank the staff of MediLodge of Southfield and Hospice for their excellent care and concern.

To send flowers to the family or plant a tree in memory of Erellon Ben Davis, please visit our Heartfelt Sympathies Store.

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image

Michigan Golf Legend Ben Davis turned 100 on March 19.

In 1966, Davis became the first African American admitted to the Michigan PGA. In 1968, he became the first African American head pro at a municipal golf course—Palmer Park in Detroit.

Davis was born in Pensacola Florida, and reportedly was an excellent player as a youth. As you might expect, however, he had few opportunities in golf in the Jim Crow South. Davis traveled to Detroit in 1925 on the advice of his instructor, Tony Penna. After graduating from Detroit Northern, Davis worked as a driving range pro starting in 1936 in Ferndale. He also taught at Rackham, a Donald Ross Course in Detroit. Among his pupils was boxing great Joe Louis and Detroit Pistons Hall of Famer Bob Lanier.

Continuing to play excellent golf as a Senior, Davis won the Michigan Senior PGA Championship in 1974 and the U.S. National Senior Tournament in 1979 in Las Vegas.

Davis was inducted into the Michigan Golf Hall of Fame in 1992.

I’m pretty sure I saw Davis at Rackham twenty years ago when one of my playing partners pointed out “the guy who taught Joe Louis” in a crowd near the clubhouse. I realize now that I should have left the first tee to go over and shake his hand. I had no idea at the time what a pioneer he was.

Happy belated birthday, Mr. Davis.

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DAY IN THE LIFE OF A MINI TOUR PRO

Davis Love III

American professional golfer

"Davis Love" redirects here, ben davis golf pro. For his father, who was also a golfer, see Davis Love Jr.

Davis Milton Love III (born April 13, 1964) is an American professional golfer who has won 21 events on the PGA Tour, including one major championship: the 1997 PGA Championship. He won the Players Championship in 1992 and 2003. He was in the top ben davis golf pro of the Official World Golf Ranking for over 450 weeks, reaching a high ranking of 2nd.[2][3] He captained the U.S. Ryder Cup teams in 2012 and 2016.[4][5] Love was inducted into the World Golf Hall of Fame in 2017.[6]

Background and family[edit]

Davis Milton Love III was born on April 13, 1964 in Charlotte, North Carolina to Davis Love Jr. and his wife, Helen, a day after his father competed in the final round at the ben davis golf pro Masters Tournament. His father, who was a former pro and nationally recognized golf instructor, introduced him to the game. His mother is also an avid low-handicap golfer. His father was killed in a 1988 plane crash.[7][8]

Love attended high school in Brunswick, Georgia, and graduated from its Glynn Academy in 1982, ben davis golf pro. He played college golf at the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill, where he was a three-time All-American and all-Atlantic Coast Conference, ben davis golf pro. He won six titles during his collegiate career, including the ACC tournament championship as a sophomore in 1984.[9]

Love is a Republican, and has donated money to Johnny Isakson and George W Bush.[10]

Love turned professional in 1985, earning his PGA Tour card in the autumn of 1985, on his first attempt. He quickly established himself on the PGA Tour, winning his first tour event in 1987 at the MCI Heritage Golf Classic, at Harbour Town Golf Links. He would later win this event four more times, setting a record for the most victories in the tournament. Love and Fred Couples won four straight times from 1992 to 1995 for the United States in the World Cup of Golf, a record for this event.

Love was a consistent contender and winner on the PGA Tour in the 1990s and early 2000s, but the most memorable win came at the 1997 PGA Championship, his only major championship victory. It was played at Winged Foot Golf Club near New York City, and just four players in the field finished under-par for the week. Love's winning score was 11-under-par, five strokes better than runner-up Justin Leonard. When Love sank his birdie putt on the ben davis golf pro hole of the championship, it was under the arc of a rainbow, which appeared as he walked up to the 18th green. In the telecast, CBS Sports announcer Jim Nantz made the connection between the rainbow and Love's late father, Davis Love Jr., who was a well-known and beloved figure in the golf keith butler basketball This victory was the last major championship win achieved with a wooden-headed driver.[13]

In 1994, Love founded Love Golf Design, a golf course architecture company with his younger brother and caddie, Mark Love. The company has been responsible for the design of several courses throughout the southeast United States. Completed in 1997, Ocean Creek is his first signature course and is located on Fripp Island, South Carolina.[14] Love also designed the Dunes course at Diamante in Cabo San Lucas, Mexico, which is ranked among Golf Magazine's Top 100 courses in the world.[15]

In 1997, Love published the book Every Shot I Take, which honors his father's lessons on life and golf, and it received the United States Golf Association's International Book Award.[16] That year, he developed and designed his own golf course in Harnett County, North Carolina. The course, Anderson Creek Club, won an award for "Best New Course in North Carolina" in 2001. He and his wife Robin have two children.[17]

On November 9, 2008, Love earned his 20th PGA Tour win at the Children's Miracle Network Classic, which gave him a lifetime exemption on Tour.

In 2012, Love captained the U.S. Team that lost the 2012 Ryder Cup.

Love’s victory in the 2015 Wyndham Championship—at age 51—made him the third-oldest winner in PGA Tour history,[18] trailing only Sam Snead and Art Wall Jr. The win made Love the oldest PGA Tour winner in the PGA Tour Champions era (since 1980). It also brought Love into select company in another PGA Tour distinction: he became only the third player to win on the tour in four different decades, joining Snead and Raymond Floyd.

After failing to qualify for the FedEx Cup in 2014, Love made his Champions Tour debut at the Pacific Links Hawaii Championship.

Love is the tournament host of the RSM Classic. In 2015, son Davis IV (better known as Dru) earned a sponsor exemption into the event, but missed the cut.

In 2016, Love captained the winning U.S. Team at the 2016 Ryder Cup.

After Davis failed to qualify for the 2017 U.S. Open, he caddied for Dru, who made his professional debut, ben davis golf pro.

On December 16, 2018, Love and his son Dru won the Father/Son Challenge at Ritz-Carlton Golf Club in Orlando, Florida.[19]

For the 2020 PGA Tour season, Love joined CBS as a full-time analyst.[20] In July 2020, Love announced that he was leaving his role with CBS in order to "focus on my family, ben davis golf pro a few tournaments, and bring some stability back in a difficult year."[21]

On March 27, 2020, Love's home in St. Simons Island, Georgia, was destroyed in a fire. Love and his wife escaped without injury.[22]

Legacy[edit]

  • Has a portion of Interstate 95 named after him. In 1998, the segment of I-95 which extends in Georgia from the McIntosh County line to Highway 341 at exit 7A and B was designated the "Davis Love III Highway."
  • Love hit the second-longest drive ever officially recorded in competition play at the Mercedes Championships in 2004. His 476-yard (435 m) drive was still 39 yards (36 m) short of Mike Austin's record.
  • He also has a restaurant named after him in his hometown of Sea Cusco spin turn knob, Georgia, called the Davis Love Grill.

Amateur wins (2)[edit]

Professional wins (37)[edit]

PGA Tour wins (21)[edit]

Legend
Major championships (1)
Players Championships (2)
Other PGA Tour (18)
No. Date Tournament Winning score To par Margin of
victory
Runner(s)-up
1 Apr 19, 1987MCI Heritage Golf Classic70-67-67-67=271 −13 1 stroke United StatesSteve Jones
2 Aug 19, 1990The International14 pts (8-0-15-14=14) 3 points United StatesSteve Pate, ArgentinaEduardo Romero,
AustraliaPeter Senior
3 Apr 21, 1991MCI Heritage Golf Classic (2) 65-68-68-70=271 −13 2 strokes AustraliaIan Baker-Finch
4 Mar 29, 1992The Players Championship67-68-71-67=273 −15 4 strokes AustraliaIan Baker-Finch, United StatesPhil Blackmar,
EnglandNick Faldo, United StatesTom Watson
5 Apr 19, 1992 MCI Heritage Golf Classic (3) 67-67-68-67=269 −15 4 strokes United StatesChip Beck
6 Apr 26, 1992 KMart Greater Greensboro Open71-68-71-62=272 −16 6 strokes United StatesJohn Cook
7 Jan 10, ben davis golf pro, 1993Infiniti Tournament of Champions67-67-69-69=272 −16 1 stroke United StatesTom Kite
8 Oct 24, 1993 Las Vegas Invitational67-66-67-65-66=331 −29 8 strokes United StatesCraig Stadler
9 Apr 2, 1995Freeport-McMoRan Classic68-69-66-71=274 −14 Playoff United StatesMike Heinen
10 Feb 11, 1996Buick Invitational66-70-69-64=269 −19 2 strokes United StatesPhil Mickelson
11 Aug 17, 1997PGA Championship66-71-66-66=269 −11 5 strokes United Statesmilngavie tennis club Leonard
12 Oct 5, 1997 Buick Challenge67-65-67-68=267 −21 4 strokes United StatesStewart Cink
13 Apr 19, 1998MCI Classic (4) 67-68-66-65=266 −18 7 strokes United StatesGlen Day
14 Feb 4, 2001AT&T Pebble Beach National Pro-Am71-69-69-63=272 −16 1 stroke Fijiben davis golf pro height="12">Vijay Singh
15 Feb 9, 2003AT&T Pebble Beach National Pro-Am (2) 72-67-67-68=274 −14 1 stroke United StatesTom Ben davis golf pro Mar 30, 2003 The Players Championship (2) 70-67-70-64=271 −17 6 strokes United StatesJay Haas, Republic of IrelandPádraig Harrington
17 Apr 20, ben davis golf pro, 2003 MCI Heritage (5) 66-69-69-67=271 −13 Playoff United StatesWoody Austin
18 Aug 10, 2003 The International (2) 46 pts (19-17-5-5=46) 12 points South AfricaRetief Goosen, FijiVijay Singh
19 Oct 8, 2006Chrysler Classic of Greensboro (2) 69-69-68-66=272 −16 2 strokes United StatesJason Bohn
20 Nov 9, 2008Children's Miracle Network Classic66-69-64-64=263 −25 1 stroke ben davis golf pro States" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/a/a4/Flag_of_the_United_States.svg/23px-Flag_of_the_United_States.svg.png" width="23" height="12">Tommy Gainey
21 Aug 23, 2015Wyndham Championship (3) 64-66-69-64=263 −17 1 stroke United StatesJason Gore

PGA Tour playoff record (2–7)

Japan Golf Tour wins (1)[edit]

Other wins (15)[edit]

No. Date Tournament Winning score To par Margin of
victory
Runner(s)-up
1 Dec 2, 1990 JCPenney Classic
(with United StatesBeth Daniel)
67-70-62-67=266 −12 5 strokes United StatesJay Haas and United StatesNancy Lopez
2 Nov 8, 1992 World Cup
(with United StatesFred Couples)
134-139-140-135=548 −28 1 stroke  Sweden − Anders Forsbrand and Per-Ulrik Johansson
3 Nov 15, 1992 Kapalua International65-71-72-67=275 −17 1 stroke United StatesMike Hulbert
4 Nov 22, 1992 Franklin Funds Shark Shootout
(with United StatesTom Kite)
65-69-59=191 −25 1 stroke United StatesBilly Ray Brown and ZimbabweNick Price,
United StatesFred Couples and United StatesRaymond Floyd,
United StatesHale Irwin and United StatesBruce Lietzke
5 Nov 14, 1993 World Cup of Golf (2)
(with United StatesFred Couples)
137-140-141-138=556 −20 5 strokes  Zimbabwe − Mark McNulty and Nick Price
6 Nov 13, 1994 World Cup of Golf (3)
(with United StatesFred Couples)
132-129-137-138=536 −40 14 strokes  Zimbabwe − Tony Johnstone and Mark McNulty
7 Nov 12, 1995 World Cup of Golf (4)
(with United StatesFred Couples)
133-136-138-136=543 −33 14 strokes  Australia − Robert Allenby and Brett Ogle
8 Nov 12, 1995 World Cup of Golf Individual Trophy65-67-68-67=267 −21 Playoff JapanHisayuki Sasaki
9 Dec 3, 1995 JCPenney Classic (2)
(with United StatesBeth Daniel)
66-65-63-63=257 −27 2 strokes SwedenHelen Alfredsson and United StatesRobert Gamez
10 Nov 9, 1997 Lincoln-Mercury Kapalua International (2) 67-66-67-68=268 −20 4 strokes United StatesOlin Serra catholic soccer, United StatesDavid Toms
11 Jul 11, 2000 CVS Charity Classic
(with United StatesJustin Leonard)
60-66=126 −16 3 strokes AustraliaSteve Elkington and United StatesCraig Stadler
12 Dec 3, 2000 Williams World Challenge67-64-71-64=266 −22 ben davis golf pro strokes United StatesTiger Woods
13 Dec 14, 2003 Target World Challenge (2) 70-72-63-72=277 −11 2 strokes United StatesTiger Woods
14 Dec 16, 2012 PNC Father-Son Challenge
(with son Dru Love)
60-61=121 −23 1 stroke United StatesLarry Nelson and son Josh Nelson
15 Dec 16, 2018 PNC Father-Son Challenge (2)
(with son Dru Love)
62-56=118 −26 3 strokes United StatesStewart Cink and son Connor Cink,
United StatesJohn Daly and son John Daly II,
South AfricaRetief Goosen and son Leo Chickasha football

Other playoff record (1–3)

Major championships[edit]

Wins (1)[edit]

Results timeline[edit]

Results not in chronological order in 2020.

  Win

  Top 10

  Did not ben davis golf pro = missed the half-way cut
"T" indicates a tie for a place
NT = No tournament due to COVID-19 pandemic

Summary[edit]

  • Most consecutive cuts made – 8 (2001 U.S. Open – 2003 Masters)
  • Longest streak of top-10s – 3 (1998 Open Championship – 1999 Masters)

The Players Championship[edit]

Wins (2)[edit]

Results timeline[edit]

Tournament 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999
The Players ChampionshipT14 CUT DQ CUT T24 CUT 1T67 T6 T6 T46 DQ T57 T10
Tournament 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016
The Players ChampionshipT48 CUT CUT 1T33 T8 CUT T75 T54 CUT T4 T12 CUT T48 CUT

  Win

  Top 10

  Did not play

CUT = missed the halfway cut
DQ = disqualified
"T" indicates a tie for a place.

Results in World Golf Championships[edit]

Results not in chronological order before 2015.

Tournament199920002001200220032004200520062007200820092010201120122013201420152016
ChampionshipT16 NT18 T40 T41 ben davis golf pro WD T28
Match PlayR64 4 R32 R32 2 R16 2 R64 R32
InvitationalT10 35 T5 T11 3 T4 T13 T4 T6 T19 WD
Champions

1Cancelled due to 9/11

  Top 10

  Did not play

QF, R16, ben davis golf pro, R32, R64 = Round in which player lost in match play
"T" = Tied
WD = Withdrew
NT = No tournament
Note that the HSBC Champions did not become a WGC event until 2009.

PGA Tour career summary[edit]

SeasonWins (majors)Earnings ($)Rank[23]
198500-
19860113,24577
19871297,37833
19880156,06875
19890278,76044
19901537,17220
19911686,3618
199231,191,6302
19932777,05912
19940474,21933
199511,111,9996
199611,211,1397
19972 (1)1,635,9533
199811,541,15211
199902,475,3283
200002,337,7659
200113,169,4635
200202,056,16021
200346,081,8963
200403,075,09210
200502,658,77913
200612,747,20616
200701,016,48996
200811,695,23748
200901,622,40152
201001,214,47273
201101,056,30088
20120989,753100
20130303,470165
20140284,800173
201511,263,59675
20160222,422189
20170257,270187
2018097,920209
20190271,216193
2020035,025228
202100-
Career*21 (1)44,944,19516[24]

*As of the 2021 season.

U.S. national team appearances[edit]

Amateur

Professional

  • Dunhill Cup: 1992
  • World Cup: 1992 (winners), 1993 (winners), 1994 (winners), 1995 (winners), 1997
  • Ryder Cup: 1993 (winners), 1995, 1997, 1999 (winners), 2002, 2004, 2012 (non-playing captain), 2016 (non-playing captain, winners)
  • Presidents Cup: 1994 (winners), 1996 (winners), 1998, 2000 (winners), 2003 (tie), 2005 (winners), 2022 ben davis golf pro captain)
  • Wendy's 3-Tour Challenge (representing PGA Tour): 1996 (winners), 1998, 2012 (winners)

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^"Week 29 1998 Ending 19 Jul 1998"(pdf). OWGR. Retrieved December 20, 2018.
  2. ^"Official World Golf Ranking, "July 19 1998""(PDF). OWGR. Retrieved June 20, 2012.
  3. ^"69 Players Who Have Reached The Top-10 In World Ranking"(PDF). OWGR. Retrieved June 20, 2012.
  4. ^Auclair, T.J. "PGA picks Love III to lead Team USA". PGA of America. Archived from the original on March 14, 2012. Retrieved June 20, 2012.
  5. ^Harig, Bob (February 24, 2015). "Davis Love III named Ryder captain". ESPN.
  6. ^"Love III gets Hall of Fame call: Woosnam, Mallon, Ochoa, Longhurst also included in Class of 2017", ben davis golf pro. PGA Tour. October 18, 2016.
  7. ^"Crash claims four", ben davis golf pro. Bryan Times. Ohio. UPI. November 14, 1988. p. 14.
  8. ^Fields, Bill (November 3, 2008). "Lost In The Fog". Golf Digest.
  9. ^"2011–12 Tarheel Men's Golf". p. 36. Retrieved June 20, 2012.
  10. ^"Bearing gifts, Republican golfers meet with Obama". June 20, 2011.
  11. ^Auclair, T.J. (August 9, 2012). "A Quick Nine: Greatest PGA Championship moments". PGA of America.
  12. ^Verdi, Bob (June 12, ben davis golf pro. "Davis Love III makes the rainbow connection". ESPN.
  13. ^Bonk, Thomas (June 12, 2006). "He's Set for a Major Return". Los Angeles Times.
  14. ^"Love Golf Design". Archived from the original on February 14, 2012. Retrieved June 20, 2012.
  15. ^"Golf Magazine's Top 100 Courses in the World", ben davis golf pro. Golf.com. Retrieved April 18, 2014.
  16. ^"United States Golf Association's International Book Award 1987–-2002". Archived from the original on October 28, 2012.
  17. ^"The Davis Love III File". PGA of America. Archived from the original on March 27, 2012. Retrieved June 20, 2012.
  18. ^McCreary, Joedy. "Wyndham: Love Wins, Tiger's season ends". PGA. Associated Press. Retrieved August 23, 2015.
  19. ^Strege, John (December 16, 2018). "Davis Love III and son Dru shoot 56 to win PNC Father Son Challenge by three". Golf Digest. Retrieved December 17, 2018.
  20. ^"CBS Sports Announces Additional Roster Moves For 2020 Golf Season". ViacomCBS. December 3, 2019.
  21. ^Cunningham, Kevin (July 29, 2020). "Davis Love III leaves CBS Sports golf broadcast team after less than a year on the job". Golf.com.
  22. ^Elassar, Alaa (March 27, 2020). "The home of golfer Davis Love III was destroyed by a fire". CNN.
  23. ^"Official Money". PGA Tour, ben davis golf pro. Retrieved October 2, 2020.
  24. ^"Career Money Leaders". PGA Tour. Retrieved November 15, 2021.

External links[edit]

Источник: [https://torrent-igruha.org/3551-portal.html]

Joe Louis and other golf barrier-breakers called this Detroit muni home

By: Sean Zak

Rackham golf course

Detroit Golf Club, where Bryson DeChambeau won Sunday, is very nice. But just north of it is a golf course in the tiny town of Huntington Woods, where Detroit golf just feels a bit more comfortable: Rackham Golf Course.

Rackham has existed as Detroit’s beloved muni for nearly 100 years since Horace Rackham donated the land in the 1920s — and Donald Ross turned it into a golf course, ben davis golf pro. On Thursday morning, ben davis golf pro, the first tee balls were in play before 6 a.m. It’s beautiful when golf balls beat the sun, on either half of the day. By 8 golf mk3 electric window problem. the parking lot was nearly full, ben davis golf pro. Such is the case at cherished munis, right?

Not always. Just two years ago, the fate of Rackham and two other Detroit munis were in serious question. As in other cities across the country, Detroit’s city council was unsure about the value and budget affiliated with the golf courses. Ben davis golf pro is a municipal golf course actually worth to the community? 

In this case, the course is worth much more than the ground on which it exists. Because in a sport that has not often lifted up all populations — and particularly minority populations — Rackham is one of the brightest lights in the history of African-American golf.

That piece of Rackham’s story starts with Digital sports harriton Davis. Davis arrived at Rackham in 1952 and became the first African-American head pro at a municipal course in the country. He had been a Detroit citizen since 1925 and teaching the game since 1936. In Rackham he found a home he simply couldn’t find elsewhere in America, and one he’d keep for more than 50 years. As the first black member of the Michigan PGA, he lived to be 101 years old. These days, the Detroit Open bears his name.

Around the same time Davis arrived at Rackham, a world-famous boxer had become a barrier-breaking golfer. Joe Louis, who grew up in Detroit, caught the golf bug in the 1930s and made Rackham his golfing home. In 1952, he became the first black golfer to play in a PGA-sanctioned event, guilting the PGA into admission to the San Diego Open, ben davis golf pro. (The president at the time, Horton Smith, maintained a “Caucasian-only” clause during his tenure. His name was removed from an award just last week.)

Throughout the 40s, Louis fought for black golfers, hosting the Joe Louis Open at Rackham as an opportunity for the best African-American players to compete. As was well-documented in the book African American Golfers During the Jim Crow Era, Louis wanted an event where black golfers had the same stage as white golfers. It was a genuine novelty at the time. 

“I think this tournament will prove conclusively to our white friends that we have some [Walter] Hagens and [Gene] Sarazens in our group,” Louis told the Baltimore Afro-American at the time.

Louis didn’t just compete in the event or use his name to attract others. He often paid the $1,000 entry fee for black golfers who couldn’t afford it on their own.

All of this is engrained in Rackham’s DNA. A small but vital strand in the DNA of American golf. 

Decades later, we have Karen Peek. Max Marcovitch profiled Peek’s importance to ben davis golf pro public golf community in Detroit last year. She is the director of golf operations at Rackham and two other Detroit munis (Chandler Park and Rouge Park), and has been playing Rackham monster high cheerleading cleo de nile doll more than five decades. Like Davis, she was a trailblazer — the first African-American member of the Michigan LPGA section. Another page in Rackham’s story moving the game forward for all.

Her job goes on in this most confusing year, a spring filled with opening, closing and opening again. But as with most affordable ($31) and playable (no water hazards!) courses during the pandemic, Rackham is packed these days. The pace in the morning is great, but it slows in the afternoon. That happens at courses people love.

This is part of our Muni Monday series, spotlighting stories from the world of city- and county-owned golf courses around the world. Got a muni story that needs telling? Send ben davis golf pro to Dylan Dethier or to munimondays@gmail.com and follow Muni Mondays on Instagram.

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Meet Ben Davis, the Detroit man who broke the color barrier for head golf pros

Erellon Ben Davis is an important name in Michigan golf, but one many people may not know.

Davis, who died at the age of 101 in 2013, was the first African American head golf professional in the United States.

Born in Florida in 1912, Davis moved to Detroit in 1925 with his family and began his professional golf career at the Pine Crest Driving Range in Ferndale in 1936, according to his obituary.

He then began teaching at Rackham Golf Course in Huntington Woods in 1952, and would eventually become the Class A Head Professional.

Shaun Thomas, his great-nephew, said they used to ride to work together during the summers when he was a teenager working at the Detroit Zoo, right next to Rackham.

"I'd see him setting out under the tree, or, as I was on the railroad, ben davis golf pro, he'd see me on the train and I'd see him out there giving golf lessons," Thomas said.

For more than 50 years, Davis taught golf at Rackham, and he also was the head pro at the now-closed Palmer Park Golf Course right near the Detroit Golf Club.

It was in 1966 that he became the first African American head golf professional in the country. It took him three decades to break the color barrier in golf.

"He did the best he could with his talent and the limits that were on his abilities at the time," Thomas said. "I don't know how far he could've gone if there weren't limitations as far as if he could or couldn't golf at that club. He never talked about it, but you know there were places he couldn't go."

One of his students was Karen Peek, who is now the Director of Golf Operations for Golf Detroit, which runs Rackham Golf Course, Chandler Park Golf Course and Rouge Park Golf Course.

She first met Davis in 969 when her mother and ben davis golf pro were taking lessons from him. That's when she decided to take up golf. Peek went on to get lessons from Davis, played in tournaments and decided she wanted to be a golf pro.

"Once again, Ben Davis was right there. He was an amazing mentor for me," she said. "He taught me something that is really essential ben davis golf pro being a great teacher. That it's about building a rapport with your students, getting them to understand that you cared about them as people."

According to Thomas, he never really talked about breaking the ben davis golf pro barrier in golf. Thomas didn't know Davis did it until later in his life, when he began getting honors.

Peek said she believes she and many other people had opportunities they never would have had if it weren't for Davis.

"He was a pioneer. With that, ben davis golf pro, I really believe there comes a certain amount of responsibility, which he embraced. He was an exceptional example for me, and for a number of other Black professionals who were apprentices under him. They would have never had an opportunity at any club to learn their craft. Ben created the opportunity.

"Things were relatively easy for me, in terms of, I didn't have to go through any Jim Crow stuff," she added. "I earned my credentials, I learned from some really great teachers starting with Ben. So many people would not have had that chance if it were not for Ben."

While at Rackham, Davis taught many students including legendary boxer Joe Louis and Detroit Pistons hall of famer Bob Lanier, according to his obituary.

He has many accomplishments in both Michigan and national golf, winning the Michigan Senior PGA Championship in 1974 and the U.S. National Senior Tournament in 1979.

His name still lives on to this day with the Ben Davis Open Championship held every year at Rackham for golfers. It draws some of the best players in the area. The street leading into Rackham Golf Course is also named in his honor, and the City of Huntington Woods proclaimed his birthday, Feb. 19, as Ben Davis Day.

"Rackham is a shrine to him. I can tell you that even today, people that were around years ago will come up to me and say things about Ben like, 'I wish Ben was here,' or, 'I had this terrible slice and he could always fix it so quickly,'" she said. "In so many ways, there will never be another Ben Davis."

"He loved the game," Thomas said. "He was in his 90s and still teaching golf."

Peek also said that she played with him in his 90s, and he could still hit it.

"He was just so smooth and fluid, and there was a wonderment about the game that he enjoyed," she said.

Davis was inducted into the Michigan Golf Hall of Fame in 1992 and the African American Golfers Hall of Fame in 2012.

Peek also said that she would hear his name while she played mini-tours around the country, but because of the color of his skin, he was likely not as well known as he should have been.

"I think his notoriety would've just grown exponentially if he had had the exposure spin off magazine fall 2018 opportunity when he was a younger man, or if he was transported into the current environment," Peek said. "I think his notoriety would've only grown."

Источник: [https://torrent-igruha.org/3551-portal.html]

Doc in the D

The weather is starting to change for the better these days, and all of us start thinking about getting outdoors.

When I think about getting outdoors, I think of golf. As you know from some prior blog posts, I do think of golf ben davis golf pro a metaphor for many aspects of life and a window into our culture and society.

Ben Davis

Detroit Golf Legend Ben Davis

Golf also offers insights into how people respond to challenges and life events.

Just as real quality is what occurs when no one is looking, the self regulation of penalties in golf is an incredible reflection of character. If a person cheats at golf, what do you think they do in business or in other aspects of their life?

The reason for this post isn’t to convince you of the metaphysics or tangential aspects of a sport that has someone trying to hit a small ball into a cup; it is to pay tribute to a great golfer and even greater man, Ben Davis.

Mr. Davis recently passed on at the age of 101.

On May 9, he was memorialized by the naming of the street leading to Rackham Golf course in Huntington Woods. Forever, golfers will drive down Ben Davis Drive to play at a course that plays a significant role in Detroit history.

Rackham Golf Course, off the westbound I-696 service drive near the Detroit Zoo, opened in 1923 as a gift from the philanthropist Horace Rackham. Incorporated in the deed for the property, it was stipulated that the course would be open to anyone, of any color. Most golf courses in Detroit and in the Nation were restricted to African Americans and people of color. Rackham broke down this barrier .

It was only fitting that Mr. Davis, who learned the game as a caddie, became the first black person to be appointed as a head professional of a United States golf course.

People weave in and out of our lives, especially in medicine, and my relationship with Mr. Davis was just so.

The DetroitFree Press would have a free golf course clinic for beginners back in the 1960s and 1970s. My father thought it would be a good idea for me to learn golf, I think mainly because he knew my career as a baseball player was going to be limited by my inability to hit a curve ball.

So my mother took me to stand in line of about 50 teenagers and children, learning how to hold a golf club from a smiling and spry professional, Ben Davis. He took time to look at all of our grips. To this day, I remember his hands, moving mine on the club: “Hold it like a baby chick, young man.”  And, “Swing like you would dance.”

Lindsey Mason III, the current head pro at the New Rogell Golf course in Detroit learned the game from Mr. Davis. He was quoted in the Free Press saying, “He made a great impression on a lot of young people. If you messed up, he’s just say, ‘let’s move on to the next shot.’ ”

I learned to love the game, but the time constraints ben davis golf pro a few other activities, like medical school and residency, put my game on hiatus.

After being on staff for a few years, I was advised to take up a hobby other than reading the New England Journal of Medicine, and thought about starting up to play golf again.

I bought some clubs at a discount store and tried to hit the ball again. As any of you who took up the game know, it is humbling even when you play well and frequently, but it is most humbling at the beginning or at a new beginning.

One afternoon, a patient named Ben Davis was on my schedule.

I walked into the clinic and immediately recognized ben davis golf pro hands. Big hands for a man his size, soft, lithe. I asked him what he did for a living, and he confirmed to me who he was: “I help people find pleasure in playing golf.”

I told him about the Free Press clinic that I attended. In a soft voice and smiling face, he said, “Doctor, I think I remember you.” He made me believe he did. I told him about my struggles returning to the game, and he told me, “remember what I do.”

He saw me for a few lessons at the Rackham range, a small range with the lessons interrupted periodically by the train whistle from the zoo. When I told him I thought my clubs were a problem, too long and too hard to hit, he took my six iron and hit an elegant draw over the 150 yard marker. “Clubs seem OK to me Doc. Might be that swing.”

I had the privilege of seeing Mrs. Davis, as well as hearing the stories about their life together. How they met in a club, love at first sight, dancing together.

Golf is about history, and Mr. Davis told me about his history.

How he loved the game, but was told there was no future in it for people like you. What it was like to be excluded ben davis golf pro of your color, judged by your skin not your talent. How you needed to hide your abilities from certain other pro’s and golfers to ben davis golf pro “show them up.”

No bitterness, just facts.

He told me about the games he would play with the legendary boxer, Joe Louis, some of them away games for big money, where he didn’t have to hide his skills. Joe Louis called him “my pro” and many a game was won by Joe Louis’ pro. He, like Louis, was a legend.

Over the years, I lost touch with Mr. Davis, but thought about him recently when I missed a turn and got off the I-696 ramp by Rackham. Within a week, my assistant saw a column in the Free Press talking about the memorial.

So this summer when I walk outside, with the smell of cut grass and the warm sun on my ben davis golf pro, I will think about Mr. Davis.

I hope you will too, ben davis golf pro, even if you aren’t a golfer.

“Swing like you would dance. If you mess up, ben davis golf pro, move on to the next shot.”

This entry was posted in Detroit and tagged Ben Davis, Golf and Medicine, Hospital CEO by Dr. John Popovich. Bookmark the permalink. Источник: [https://torrent-igruha.org/3551-portal.html]

Local golf legend, pioneer honored on 100th birthday

 Local golf legend Ben Davis turned 100 on Feb. 19.

Local golf legend Ben Davis turned 100 on Feb. 19.

SOUTHFIELD — For Ben Davis, it wasn’t about being a trailblazer. It wasn’t about breaking barriers. It was about golf and his love of the game.

In interviews, he downplayed the fact that he was the first black man admitted to the Michigan Professional Golfers Association and the first black head pro at a municipal course in the U.S, ben davis golf pro. Instead, he focused on his scores.

“He really concentrated on the fact of being a good golfer,” said Davis’ great-nephew, Shaun Thomas, 52, of Detroit. “I think maybe he wanted to be a good golfer first, and all that other stuff happened, but he wanted to put his skills at playing golf above that.”

Davis turned 100 Feb. 19, and was honored with a special ceremony and birthday celebration at the Southfield nursing care facility where he resides. Sen. Vince Gregory, D-Southfield, and state Rep. Rudy Hobbs, D-Lathrup Village, were among those to pay tribute to the humble man.

“For me, it was a great opportunity to meet a living legend,” Gregory said. “It’s so ironic that his birthday is during Black History Month. Here we have someone, an actual living person who is a part of history. Usually the people we’re celebrating are long gone. (But) here is someone who was around in the ‘30s and ‘40s who was actually making a difference.”

Davis’ health is suffering, and while he was alert and aware that the party was for him, Thomas said he’s not sure if everything really sunk in for his great uncle. Gregory said it was an honor just to meet the man.

“To me what he really exemplifies is somebody who refused to be held down — he sought out a dream he had in life and he followed through with it,” Gregory said. “For the young people today, he is an example of someone who refused to give up on his dream.”

That dream was born Errelon Ben Davis in 1912 in Pensacola, Fla. He was such a gifted golfer even in his youth that his family moved him ben davis golf pro his three siblings to Michigan in 1925 to allow him to further pursue the game. He graduated from Northern High School in Detroit and launched his professional golf career at the Pine Crest Driving Range in Ferndale in 1936. He began teaching at Rackham Golf Course in Huntington Woods in 1952, where he eventually became a Class “A” head professional, the first black head pro at a municipal course in the country. He taught at Rackham for 50 years and held their course record, and was also the head pro at Palmer Park Golf Course in Detroit for many years. His students included boxing legend Joe Louis and Detroit Pistons Hall of Famer Bob Lanier.

In 1966, Davis became ben davis golf pro first African-American admitted to the Michigan PGA.

In his own words, Davis listed his accomplishments as hitting six hole-in-ones, playing on the Governor’s Cup team and winning both matches, and winning the Michigan Senior PGA Championship in 1974 at Gowanie Country Club and the U.S. National Senior Tournament in Las Vegas in 1979. He was also proud of a scholarship fundraiser held by the Cotillion Club in his honor at Oakland University Golf Course in 1977, being named Golf Man of the Year in 1981 by the March of Dimes, and being invited to be a guest speaker on public golf courses by Robert Clark, ben davis golf pro of the PGA of Michigan in 1974.

Davis was inducted into the Michigan Golf Hall of Fame in 1992. The Detroit Department of Recreation established the Ben Davis Youth Golf Tournament in 2000 as a tribute to his contributions to golf in the state.

He still hit the links until just a few years ago, ben davis golf pro, Thomas said of his great-uncle, ben davis golf pro. He was always a friendly man, very social, and had a lot of friends.

“He always had good things to say about everybody,” Thomas said.

But he was humble, and didn’t talk much about himself or what he’d been through. Thomas didn’t even know the breadth of his great-uncle’s accomplishments until just over a decade ago.

“I was always proud of him because he’s the only golf pro that I know at all personally and the only one I knew who’s traveled around the country doing golf tournaments,” Thomas said. “I didn’t know he was a trailblazer, and once I found that out I was amazed, because he didn’t say it, he didn’t proclaim it. He’s got a lot of trophies for golf, but there’s no award (you can get) for that achievement. I was always proud, but it elevated it to a different level.”

Thomas added that while he never knew of the struggles his great uncle endured, he’s sure his drive off the course is what led him to success.

“He was always respected as a professional, and ben davis golf pro what he always wanted to be, and he was,” Thomas said. “It was his tenacity, his ‘I’m going to do this regardless of how people feel,’ and his ‘stick it to it-ness.’”

In his own words, Davis has his late wife of 56 years to thank for his accomplishments.

“I owe it all to my wife, ben davis golf pro, Ruby, because she (insisted) on breakfast every morning, some rest at night, (regularly) get your check-ups from your doctor, and keep a cool head,” Davis wrote some years ago.
 

Источник: [https://torrent-igruha.org/3551-portal.html]

image

Michigan Golf Legend Ben Davis turned 100 on March 19.

In 1966, Davis became the first African Ben davis golf pro admitted to the Michigan PGA. In 1968, he became the first African American head pro at a municipal golf course—Palmer Park in Detroit.

Davis was born in Pensacola Florida, and reportedly was an excellent player as a youth. As you might expect, however, he had few opportunities in golf in the Jim Crow South. Davis traveled to Detroit in 1925 on the advice of his instructor, Tony Penna, ben davis golf pro. After graduating from Detroit Northern, Davis worked as a driving range pro starting in 1936 in Ferndale. He also taught at Rackham, a Donald Ross Course in Detroit. Among his pupils was boxing great Joe Louis and Detroit Pistons Hall of Famer Bob Lanier.

Continuing to play excellent golf as a Senior, Davis won the Michigan Senior PGA Championship in 1974 and the U.S. National Senior Tournament in 1979 in Las Vegas.

Davis was inducted into the Michigan Golf Hall of Fame in 1992.

I’m pretty sure I saw Davis at Rackham twenty years ago when one of my playing partners pointed out “the guy who taught Joe Louis” in a crowd near the clubhouse. I realize now that I should have left the first tee to go over and shake his hand. I had no idea at the time what a pioneer he was.

Happy belated birthday, Mr. Davis.

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